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Full text of "Coast Seamen's Journal (Sept.25,1907-Sept.16,1908)"

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500? 04at310 7 

California Slate Library 





INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-ONE. 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1907 SEPTEMBER 16, 1908. 



Title No. Page 

A 

Accidents, Railway 3 3 

Accidents on Railroads 8 4 

Accidents of Year 1907 in United States. 16 14 

Accidents on Railroads 20 13 

Acts, Trade-Union 52 11 

African Mines, Labor in 13 9 

Age of Human Race 37 3 

Age of Chivalry. An 39 9 

Agreement on Insurance 28 2 

Aid for Life-Savers 19 8 

Air to Raise Ships 14 3 

Air, Millions Out of the 35 10 

Alcoholism in France 2 3 

Alcoholism in France 9 3 

Alaska As An Asset 18 11 

Alaska Packers' Association, Financial 

Statement 20 5 

Alaska's Copper Output 18 11 

Alliance, An Unholy (British Shipping 

Federation ) 9 6 

Alps, Across The By Canal 32 3 

Alps, First Balloon Across 35 10 

Amazon, The Upper 23 11 

Ambergris, Find of 41 5 

American, Disappearance of 28 10 

American Navy, Needs of 31 3 

American Woodpile, The .' 37 9 

American Navy, Capacity of 37 10 

"American Influence," The 42 9 

American Ships in Bristol 45 9 

Ancient Mariners. Some 3 3 

Andes, Great Wall of the 35 11 

Animal Life of the Sea 31 10 

Antwerp Diamond Industry 42 11 

Apprentices on the Coast 3 6 

Apprentice, Pilot, New Rule 29 3 

Arena, London's Immense 18 10 

Architecture, Marine 26 3 

Army and Navy Bands, To Prohibit 

Competition by 21 15 

Army (British) Estimates 25 4 

Armies. Strength of European 44 10 

Army, The Depleted 11 3 

Artificial Tidal Waves 35 3 

Assassination of King Carlos 22 4 

As Others See Him (Andrew Furuscth in 

Europe) 50 6 

Atlantic, Wireless Across 3 3 

Atlantic Liners, New French 12 8 

Atlantic Timer Navigation 29 3 

Australia and Colored Labor 31 11 

Australia, Divining Rod in 38 11 

Australia, Women Workers in 50 4 

Australian Unions, Membership and 

Finances 16 12 

Australian Line Desired 21 10 

Australian Notes 10-3: 14-9 

Austrian Living Expenses .28 11 

A. F. of L. — Convention Proceedings, etc. — 

Convention Call 2 2 

Appeal for Telegraphers 2 11 

President Gompers' Report 11 1 

Seamen vs. Longshoremen 11 6 

Membership and Finances of 11 11 

Convention Proceedings 12 1 

Labor Bills in Congress 34 1 

A. F. of L. — Policy in Political Campaign — 

A. F. of L. on Injunctions 6 7 

Cannon's Labor Record 9 1 

Appeal to Congress 28-6; 29-1 

Address to Workers 29 2 

Be Up and Doing! (Address to 

Workers) 29 6 



Title No. Page 

Labor Mass-Meeting (San Francisco). 

30-6; 31-6 

Appeal for Funds 35 6 

Read, Reflect, Then Judge A. 1'". of L. 

Policy 36 6 

Dangerous Criticism 38 1 

Gompers on the Party Planks 47 1 

Lewis Denies Interview 47 6 

A. F. of L. Presents the Situation 48 1 

Read, Mark, and Act ! 48 6 

Appeal for Funds 48 6 

Congress and Labor (Legislative Re- 
port) 49 1 

Labor Bills Suppressed 49 6 

Gompers States the Issue 50 1 

Gompers States the Issue 51 2 

"Straw Man," Another 51 6 

Cry for More (In) Equity. The 52 1 

Labor Is Non-Partisan 52 6 

Labor Editors in Conference 52 7 

Arbitration, Compulsory, etc. — 

Strike Declared Illegal (New Zealand) 1 7 

Strikers Sent to Prison 2 6 

Arbitration Act Condemned 2 12 

Compulsory Arbitration Defeated (Brit- 
ish Trade-Union Congress) 3 7 

Compulsory Arbitration (British Trade- 
Union Congress) 6 6 

Strikers Fined in New Zealand 6 12 

Opposition to Arbitration Law (New 

Zealand) 10 12 

New Zealand Miners Dissatisfied With 

Arbitration Court 33 12 

No Compulsory Investigation 35 2 

Evasion of Awards by Employers 48 15 

Unions in Australia and New Zealand 

Revolt Against 49 4 

Threat to Prosecute Strikers (New 

Zealand) 52 4 

Atlantic Department — 

Legal Aider at Sea 1 6 

Legal-Aiders Exposed 6 6 

Legal-Aiders Again 15 6 

Items from the Gulf (By George C. 

Bodine) 20 3 

Retrospection ( By "The Beachcomb- 
er") 21 3 

Along the Coast (By "The Read comb- 
er") 22 3 

Atlantic Coast Notes ( By "The Beach- 
comber") 23 3 

"Poor Jack" Again ( By "The Beach- 
comber") 26 3 

Pendleton I s Sorry 26 3 

Massachusetts Against Seamen 33 6 

Thornier Complimented 36 3 

Atlantic Seamen's Benefits 36 3 

Good Work on the Gulf 37 3 

Launch for New York 37 3 

Conditions on the Coast ( Ry James IF 

Williams) 39 3 

Wages and Conditions (Ry James H. 

Williams) 41 3 

Coast Conditions Compared 43 3 

Chinese Crew, Strike of 43 3 

Dip of The Sentinel, The ( Ry James 

II. Williams) _ 44 3 

Seamen's Union Election 45 3 

Thanks to Fogg 45 3 

Chinese Puzzle, A 46 3 

Comparison of Methods (Ry James II. 

Williams) 46 10 

Boston-Cuba Company 47 3 

Crew Demand Wages 47 3 



Title No. Page 

Negroes and Whites 48 3 

Whites and Chinese at Outs 50 3 

Seamen and Their Friends (By F. 

Benson) 52 3 

Seamen Suffocated 52 3 

B 

Balloon Race, Long Distance Prize 1 13 

Balloon Across Alps, First 35 10 

Barges for the Coast 51 8 

Battleship's Dress Suit 6 3 

Battleships, Age Limits of 18 2 

Battleships or Statesmen? 34 6 

Bay State, Children Work in 9 2 

Belgium's Coal Industry 15 3 

Berg, A Tall 51 3 

Bermuda Yacht Race 40 3 

Birth Rate of France 35 13 

Bitumen in Dead Sea 40 11 

Blood-Money and Unemployed (By "El 

Tuerto" ) 24 2 

Blue Whale, The 19 11 

Bohemia, Dwellings in 1 11 

Boston, Cosmopolitan 11 2 

Bottles, Recovery of At Sea 27-4; 27-5 

Boycott, The Spirit of '76 16 6 

Boycott in History, The 21 1 

Brazil, Niagara of 21 10 

Brazil's Monster Battleships 37 3 

Brazilian Immigration 37 9 

Brazilian Drydock 51 11 

Breaking Records 8 3 

Britain's Drink Expenditures 34 2 

British Treatment of Indians 4 3 

British Postal Service 5 10 

British Trade-Union Congress 6 1 

British Soldier in India 6 10 

British Coal Exports 12 10 

British Workers, Health of 13 3 

British Parcels Post 16 11 

British Tonnage 24 3 

British Ships, Foreigners on 24 3 

British Rule in India 24 3 

British Naval Base 28 3 

British Industrial Conditions 32 3 

British Navy, Fuel in 32 10 

British Marine, Salaries in 35 3 

British Shipping Acts 45 11 

British Postal Employes 52 10 

Bruges. Reawakening of 8 11 

Burial Insurance in Vienna 1 2 

C 

California State Federation of Labor (Re- 
port of Delegate Maearthur) 16 1 

California State Federation of Labor. 

Convention of 17 6 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany, Sentence of Manager Brown.... 34 14 

Calendar, Old and New 23 11 

Callao, Lima and 25 3 

Campbell-Bannerman, British Premier, 

Heath of... 34 13 

Canada's Subsidy PoHcy 5 3 

Canada, Drink Habit in 7 3 

Canada. Population of 8 14 

Canada's Fuel Problem 15 10 

Canada, Contract Labor in 37 

Canada, Labor in 47 11 

Canada, Subsidies in 52 10 

Canadian Fishing Enterprise 35 11 

Canadian Disputes \et 51 10 

Canal, Georgian Bav 30 3 

Canal, Vro •. i't \]->s by 32 3 

Canal. IV-- i > " n ! h 48 3 

Cape Colony, Insurance in 20 11 



COAST SEAMEN'S [OURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-ONE. 



Title No. Page 

Caribbean Wireless Stations 37 10 

ways, Food for 44 3 

Casualties, Shipping 11 9 

Century, South Americas 32 10 

Ceylon Pearl Fisheries 15 11 

Chambermaid a Seaman J8 9 

sea (Mass.), Fire in U 13 

Chesapeake, Flag of Sold 20 4 

Chicago <t 1 1 < 1 San Francisco i Fire ( i 

parisons) 8 3 

Child Labor in District of Columbia, 

Passage of Bill 57 4 

Child Labor, Spanish 44 11 

Child Labor in Italy 47 11 

Children Work in Bay State 9 2 

Chilean Nitrate Combine 12 8 

China's Opium Smokers 9 11 

Chinese Home Building 12 8 

Chinese on British Ships 33 1 

Chivalry, An Age of 39 9 

Cigars in India, Cheap 11 8 

Cigarmakers' Finances 37^ 11 

Cities, Growth of Great 55 Hi 

Cities, Growth oi German 38 Hi 

Cities, Relative Positions of 41 11 

Citizens' Alliance Bugaboo (Mayor Tay 

lor on) 9 7 

Classes in Sell' "ils } 

Class,-, in Japan i 43 11 

Cleveland. GrOVer, Death of 41 12 

Cliff House (S I I Destroyed 1 4 

I loci Regulator, Dial As 27 9 

Coal Exports, British 12 10 

Coal, Smokeless in England 14 9 

Coal Industry, Belgium's 15 3 

Coal Mining Safe, Makes 24 11 

Coal, The Future of 28 11 

Coal, Output of in United Kingdom 35 12 

Coaling Ships at Sea 30 3 

Coasl (Pacific) Apprentices "it the 3 6 

Coast Places, Names of SO Hi 

Collision by Suction a Myth 21 8 

Color of the Sea 32 3 

Combination Signal, A 47 3 

Commission cm Safety of Life at Sea.... 36 IS 

"Commodity," Labor Not a 49 6 

Compensation for Injuries 49 

Concrete Houses, Edison's 25 

Concrete Boats 48 11 

Co-Operative Societies in Germany 23 12 

Conciliation (Industrial), British Trade.. 15 3 

( lost of Yachts 1 3 

Congressmen, Salaries of 18 10 

Copper Output. Alaska's 18 11 

Cremation in Germany 20 10 

Crew, Shipping a in Londi m 28 2 

Crime. Increase of in Germany 7 10 

Crimp, Shanghaiing a (By "Hawserlaid 

Bill") 6 2 

.Crimes of Children in New York City... 44 12 

Crimping, A Case of 38 3 

Crusader-. Descendants of 31 10 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, etc. — 

Chinese Crews, Ruling on 4 1 

"End of Voyage" 4 11 

Witthof Awarded Damages 6 5 

Dole's Opinion (Witthof Damage Case) 8 1 

Award of Damages (Witthof Case)... 8 6 

Head Tax, Payment of 9 11 

Seamen Not Immigrants 16 3 

"Deserters" Awarded Pay 20 6 

Peterson, Paul (Disrated Second Mate 

Awarded 1 >amages i 21 5 

Damages for Mate 25 10 

Whalers Awarded Damaires ("Bow- 

head") 31 1 

Bowhead Decision, The 31 7 

Damages for Blockade Runners 37-1: 37-6 

Workmen's Compensation Act 38 3 

Damages to Mate of Robert 1. ewers.. 39 5 

■ Refused Damages 42 5 

Damages for Cruel Treatment (Whaler 

Bowhead) 42 5 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Our "Coming of Age" (the Journal).. 1 1 
Coast Seamen's Journal. Contemporary 

mment 7 6 

Journal Roasted, The 42 6 

D 

Death Penalties, English 17 11 

Debt, Imprisonment for ^7 II 

Dead. Bringing to Life 38 10 

Dead Sea. Bitumen in 40 11 

Defens,- of Tobacco 47 10 

Democratic Advance, A 15 2 

Democrats Pledged to Labor 36 6 

Department Stores German 3 3 

t, Water on the 23 3 

Devil Fish, Harpooning 31 3 

Diamonds by the Ton 1 2 

Diamond Industry, Antwerp 42 11 

ipearanci of Vmerican 28 10 

Discovery of Buried Treasure 50 3 

Display of Modern Wealth 31 3 

Disputes Act, Canadian 51 10 

Distances Between Ports 27 8 

Div'ning Rod in Australia 38 11 

Docks, The I ondon 51 10 

Dogwatch Yarn. A (By "Hawserlaid 

Bill") .' 8 2 

ogwatch Jott'ngs (By "El Tuerto").... 40 

Dredgers for Liverpool 38 11 

Prink Habit in Canada 7 3 

Drink Expenditures, Britain's 34 2 



Title- 



No Page 



Drydock, Brazilian 51 

Durban, Harbor of 16 



Earthquakes and Volcanoes 1 

Earth's Population 4 

Eight Hour ( )r<ler 4 

Edison's Concrete Houses 25 

Education, Compulsory 2 

Education in Germany 6 

Eight-Hour Law (Telegraphers) Uncon- 

stitutii mal 1 

Election, The San Francisco 8 

Electricity from Wind 16 

Elkins Bill (Ship Subsidy), Analysis of.. 28 

Elusive North Pole 34 

Emigration, Italian 17 

Emigration from Germany 46 

Employers' Liability Act Declared Un- 
constitutional 18 

Encroachments of the Sea 1 

Engine, Radial 16 

England, Japan and Russia 7 

England, Wages in 34 

English Death Penalties 17 

English a World Language 25 

Englishman in Japan. First 24 

Esquimau Dog, Training an 37 

Europe, Seamen's Union of 7 

Europe, Trade Unionism in 15 

Europe, Trade-Unions in 26 

Europe, Unemployed in 52 

European Armies, Strength of 44 

Executions in Russia 5 

Executions, Number of in Russia 48 

Exhibition, Grand, in Japan 14 

Expedition, South Pole 35 



Factories, British, Women in 46 

Factory Laws. Swiss 46 

Falkland Island Industries 15 

Far East, Modernizing the 29 

"Fighting Holt's" Log 50 

hiring Across Seas 49 

Fisheries, Madagascar Pearl 26 

Flag of Chesapeake Sold 20 

Fleet, To Raise Sunken 8 

Fleet, Welcome the 33 

Fleet, United States Battleship, Arrival 

of at San Francisco 34 

Fleet, Use for the 

Fleet, United States Battleship, Cost of 

Coal 

Fleet, Sailing of the from San Francisco 43 

Fogs, Getting Rid of 28 

Food, Sugar a Powerful ^2 

F 1 for Castaways 44 

Food, Prices of, 1907 45 

Foreign Capital in Japan 15 

Foreigners on British Ships 24 

Foreigners on Iiritish Ships 30 

"Foreigners" and Americans 39 

Forty-Seven-Story Structure 5 

Four Day Boat, The (Lusitania-Maure- 

tania) ' 9 

Fourth of July. Victims of 52 

Fox. Martin (Ironmolders), Death of.... 6 

France. Alcoholism in 2-3; 

France. Freeholders in 7 

France, Birth Rate of 35 

Freedom to "Obey Orders" 4i) 

French Atlantic Liners. New 12 

French Vital Statistics 23 

French Sea Foods 24 2; 3 

French, Passing of the 38 

Fuel Problem, Canada's 15 

Fuel in British Navy '2 

Furuseth does Abroad 35 

Furuseth Writes from Europe 

45-1; 4h-6; 47-7: 48 7: 4') 7: 50-7 : 

Future of the Pacific, The W 



34 
37 



11 

H) 



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11 
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12 
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11 

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14 

14 

11 

10 



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11 

3 
10 

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6 

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7 

15 

6 

11 

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14 

3 

3 
11 

6 
10 

2 

14 

13 

<> 3 

11 

13 

6 

8 

3 

-11 

2 

10 

10 

6 



Fisheries — 

V.iskan Season's Catch 

Fishermen's Conference 

Wood and Nushagak Rivers Closed. 

La Rochelle Fisheries 

Abolition of Fish Traps. 



3 
HI 
15 
16 
17 

Salmon Fisheries Protected 17 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, Report on 
Closing of Wood and Nushagak 

Rivers 17 

Alaska Packers' Association, Financial 

Si tement 20 

Marked Crab Found 20 

Canadian Herring Fishery 25 

Fish Wheels in Oregon 31 

Salmon in Chile 31 

Fishermen's Victory in Oregon (By 

Ed. Rosenberg) 41 

Record-Breaking Catch 45 

Bristol Bay Salmon Pack. 1908 40 



Gary, Magical 

Gas Engine, Marine 44 

George Washington (By "Hawserlaid 

Bill") 1<» 

(ic irgian Bay Canal 30 

German Labor Market 2 

German Department Stores 3 

German Industries, Growth of 10 

German Shipbuilding 18 

German Industries, Women in 34 

German Cities. Growth of J8 



51-7 

10 



5 

11 

3 

6 

10 

2 

id 

5 



HI 
li 

2 

3 

11 

3 

s 

3 
11 
10 



Title \,, 

German Unemployed. The 39 11 

German Ironworkers' Wages 44 10 

German Population 4X .} 

( ierman Shipbuilding 48 3 

Germany, Pensions in 4 l() 

Germany. Education in 6 HI 

Germany, Increase of Crime in 7 10 

Germany and Her Seamen 19 6 

Germany, Cremation in 2(1 10 

Germany. Strikes in 29 11 

Germany's Marine 31 2 

Germany Not Overcrowded 34 2 

Germany, Urban Growth in 38 11 

Germany's Economic Strength 42 10 

Germany, Emigration from 42 2 

Germany, Trade-Unions in 48 2 

Germany, Insurance in 50 10 

Gibbons on the Unions 4 6 

Gold Camp. Richest 1 10 

Gold, Production of in U. S. in 1907.... 16 14 

Gold Fields. New 27 11 

Gold Yield of Transvaal 27 14 

Gondoliers of Venice 27 2 

Grand Canal Improvements 47 10 

Great Britain's Sea Power 27 3 

Greenland, Life of 19 11 

Growth of Lake Ships 1 8 

Growth of Great Cities 35 10 

Gulf. Lakes to the 1 8 

Gulf, Waterway to the 5 3 

Gunnery (Naval) Record 30 4 

Guns, Noiseless 45 11 

Gyroscope, Doctor Schlick's 25 11 

H 

Hamburg Strike Decision 2(1 10 

"Hands Aero,, the Sea" 34 3 

Harbor of Durban 16 10 

Harbor Lights Under Water 31 3 

Harbor of Montreal 47 3 

Harpooning Devil Fish 31 3 

Haskell. B. G. ( Death of) 9 6 

Hawaii. Sponges in 22 11 

Health of British Workers 13 3 

Health of San Francisco 22 6 

Hennig, Captain (Life Saving Service), 

Resignation of 48 5 

Hero, A Life Saving 9 3 

Heroes of Labor 40 10 

High License Ground, Fake 24 6 

History, The Boycott in 21 1 

Hours, Average of Labor. 1907 45 14 

Hotel for the Poor 50 11 

Hous,- f Lords, The 38 2 

How Old Is \„n? 35 8 

Hudson Hay Port. New 20 10 

Human Race. Age of 37 3 

Husbands As Prizes 5 11 

Hatters' Case— 

"Another Plow at Labor" 21-6; 21-15 

Supreme Court on 25 1 

Obey the Court! 25 6 

Decision of United States Supreme 

Court 26 1 

Report on Sherman Act. San F'ran- 

cisco Labor Council 27 1 

l.oewe vs. Hatters (By "A I'.ritish S 

man") 27 3 

Public Rights in Danger 27 6 

Sulzer Presents Labor's Views 32 

Labor and Anti-Trust Law 36 1 

I 

Illiteracy in United States 47 11 

Immigration Problem 7 11 

Immigration During 1907 15 15 

Immigrants. Thrift of Italian 34 10 

Immigration, Brazilian 37 9 

Imprisonment for Debt 37 11 

India, Hritish Rule in 24 3 

Indians. I'.ritish Treatment of 4 3 

India. Rritish Soldier in 6 10 

India. Political Unrest in 7 

India. Cheap Cigars in 11 8 

Industrial Education 18 6 

Industries, German, Women in 34 11 

Industrial Conditions, British 32 3 

industry, Women in 21 11 

In Extremis (By "LI Tuerto") 43 2 

Injuries, Compensation for 49 11 

Inspection (Steamship). For Improved.. 29 3 

Insurance, Burial, in Vienna 1 2 

Insurance in Cape Colony 20 

Insurance Against Sickness 22 11 

Insurance. Agreement on 28 2 

Insurance, Savings Bank 46 3 

Insurance in Germany 50 10 

Intemperate Decision. \n. Prohibition... 27 6 

I reland. Population of 7 

Ireland, Labor in 41 10 

Irish Poor, Life of the 37 10 

Co,, Ore. World's Output of 20 3 

Ironworkers' Wages. German 44 10 

Italian Press. Features of 7 2 

Italian Emigration 17 11 

Italian Day of Rest 41 9 

Italj Absentee Landlords in 26 

Italy, Child Labor in 47 11 

Injunction, Government by, etc. — 

Buck Stove and Range Company In- 
junction. Protest of A. F. of 1 

20 1; 20-6: 20-7 

Taft and the fniunction 3 

Se -mien's Unions Enjoined 3 6 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-ONE. 



Title No. Page 

Hammond Injunction, The 5 1 

Limit in Injunctions, The 5 6 

A. F. of L. on Injunction 6 7 

Imprisoned for Contempt 17 IS 

Taft-Roosevelt Plan 21 6 

Fine and Imprisonment for Violating 

Injunction 24 15 

Imprisonment for Violating Injunc- 
tion, President Refuses Pardon 25 15 

Buck Injunction Made Permanent 28 15 

Roosevelt on the Injunction 32 6 

Keep the Issue Clear! 37 6 

Falsifying the Case 37 6 

Pro-Injunctionists Answered (San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council) 37 7 

Bound by Rules 38 3 

Pro-Injunction Memorial 38 6 

Courts and Constitution (Article by 

Judge Clark) 39 1 

Injunction Issue Evaded 40 1 

Speaker Cannon Approves .' . 40 7 

Judicial Supremacy (Article by Judge 

Clark) 41 1 

Pro-Injunction Platform, A (By E. 

Ellison) 41 11 

Criticizing the Judiciary 42 6 

Congressional Perfidy 43 1 

Injunction the Main Issue 43 6 

Democratic Injunction Plank 43 6 

Pro-Injunction Plank, The 44 1 

Insult to Intelligence 44 6 

History Repeats Itself (By E. Elli- 
son) 44 7 

Argonaut Gets the "Big Bull" 45 7 

Injunctions and Common Law 46 2 

Taft on Injunctions 46 6 

Hanford on Unionism 47 6 

Taft Begs the Question 51 6 

Injunctions and Police Power (By E. 

Ellison) 51 7 

Taft on the Injunction 52 2 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Seamen's Convention (Call for) 5 7 

Our Annual Convention 10 6 

Seamen vs. Longshoremen 11 6 

Convention Proceedings 13-1; 14-1 

Seamen's Work Reviewed 15 1 

Old Friends and New 15 6 

Seamen and Longshoremen 18 6 

Seamen's Bills in Congress (Furuseth's 

Report) 22-1 ; 22-6 

Congress on Manning Question 30 1 

Undermanning Bill Passed 30 6 

Firemen's Workday. The 32 6 

Barge Law, New 34 6 

Secretary-Treasurer's Report 36 3 

Seamen and Immigrants (Department 

Ruling) 45 6 

Safety of Life at Sea, For the 46-1; 46-6 

J- 

Jack Balcomb's "Gal" (By "Hawserlaid 

Bill") 12 3 

Japan, Grand Exhibition in 14 11 

Japan, Foreign Capital in 15 3 

Japan, First Englishman in 24 10 

Japan's Navy, About 29 10 

Japan, Classes in 43 11 

Japan Sweeping Westward 44 2 

Japanese Sea Power 18 2 

Japanese Merchant Marine 27 3 

Japanese Navy, Rank of 47 14 

Jews in Russia 18 1 

Johnson (Tom L. ) and Cleveland 9 11 

Jute Culture, Improving 13 8 

Japanese and Chinese Exclusion — 

Bee (Sacramento) Demands Exclusion. 1 6 

Trouble at Vancouver, B. C 1-6; 1-7 

Exclusion League in New Zealand 1 12 

Japanese Miners Deported 1 14 

Canadian Labor on Treaty Between 

Japan and Great Britain 1 14 

Two Japans, The 2 1 

Chinese Emigration 2 3 

Landing Prohibited at Vancouver, B. C. 2 4 

Congress and Exclusion 2 6 

London Spectator on Exclusion 2 7 

Question of Race, A 2 10 

Vancouver's Peculiar Idea 2 11 

Suit for Damages (Vancouver, B. C. ) . . 3 4 

Petition for Exclusion (Canada) 3-4; 3-7 

Kingston, Jamaica, Demands Exclusion 3 14 

Ruling on Chinese Crews 4 1 

Chinese Crews, Straus' Ruling 4 6 

Sane Eastern View 4 10 

Bellingham Outbreak, The 4 11 

Color, Not a Question of 5 2 

Japan Has Race Problem 5 11 

Japanese Bar Coolies 6 3 

Japanese Nettle, Grasp the 6 3 

Immigration (to U. S.) from Japan.... 6 4 

Japan on the High Seas 7 10 

Immigration from Japan 9 13 

Japan's Commercial Growth 10 3 

Vancouver Damage Suits Settled 10 13 

Nullify the Exclusion Act 11 6 

Chinese in Other Countries 11 8 

Exclusion Bill Introduced in Congress. 12 14 

False Alarm, A 15 6 

Japs in Fruit Industry 17 3 

Japanese Immigration 18 2 

Americans Must Go. The 19 6 

Asiatic Boycott in the Transvaal 21 14 

Grounds of Exclusion 23 1 



Title No. Page 

Exclusion Convention (Seattle) Pro- 
tests Against Chinese on American 

Vessels 24 6 

Exclusively Japanese Town 25 13 

Oriental Immigration 26 10 

Race Question in Colonies 26 11 

Chinese in Hawaii 27 9 

Brewer and the Chinese 27 10 

Oriental Exclusion 27 11 

Racial War in Transvaal 28 II 

Exclusion Policy Settled 30 7 

Wages in Japan 30 10 

Immigration of "Relatives" to Hawaii. 30 14 

Astonishing Charge, An 34 2 

Yellow Race and Australia 35 11 

Operation of Exclusion Laws 35 11 

Immigration to Hawaii and Canada.... 37 12 

Taft on Exclusion 41 h 

"National Anti - Asiatic Immigration 

League" 48 12 

Oriental Exclusion 49 10 

French Laundry Proprietors Organize 

to Oppose Japanese Competition.... 49 14 

Asiatic Immigration 52 11 

K-L 

Kelvin's Services to Mankind 23 10 

King Carlos, Assassination of 22 4 

Labor Market, German 2 11 

Labor in the South Seas 11 2 

Labor Union, The (By Edward J. Liver- 

nash) 7 1 

Labor Press, The 18 11 

Labor, Colored, Australia and 31 11 

Labor and Politics (From Ironmolders' 

Journal) 35 1 

Labor, Contract, in Canada 37 11 

Labor Papers of Pacific Coast (By Ira 

Cross) 39 2 

Labor, Heroes of 40 10 

Labor in Ireland 41 10 

Labor in Canada 47 11 

Labor Not a "C< mmiodity" 49 6 

Labor Day, 1908 49 7 

Labor Day, Turn Out on 50 6 

Labor Day, Keynote of 51 1 

Labor Day, A Great 52 6 

Labor Day Press, The 52 7 

Lake Port, New 20 8 

Lake Commerce Increasing 26 8 

Language, English a World 25 11 

Landlords, Absentee, in Italy 26 11 

Launching Accident, A Curious 11 10 

•Legislators, Our Luxurious 3 10 

Liberty, True Significance of 42 9 

License Fad, The 19 7 

Life, The Risk of 34 3 

Life of the Irish Poor 37 10 

Life, Bringing Dead to 38 10 

Life-Line, Throwing Out the 51 3 

Life- Saving Hero, A 9 3 

Life-Savers, Aid for 19 8 

Life-Savers, To Increase I'ay of 24 5 

Life-Savers' Pay 25 9 

Life-Saving Service 27 10 

Life-Saving Service Bill Passed to In- 
crease Salaries 29 4 

Light, Most Powerful 2 5 

Lignum Saltjunkus (By "El Tuerto"') . . . . 33 3 

I .ima and Callao 25 3 

Lincoln's Birthday, To Make a Public 

Holiday 22 13 

Liquor Used in United Kingdom 5 2 

Liquors in the Tropics - 35 2 

Liverpool, Dredgers for 38 11 

Living Expenses, Austrian 28 11 

"Living Wage," Definition of 43 4 

Log Raft, Size of Largest 1 5 

London and New York 3 10 

London's Immense Arena 18 10 

London Streets, Perils of 40 2 

London Docks, The 51 10 

Longshoremen, Pacific Coast 26 7 

Los Angeles. Warning from 23 2 

Lusitania's Triumph, The 7 3 

Lakes Department — 

Lakes to the Gulf 1 8 

Small Vessels Scarce 1 8 

Weather Bureau Report (Wreck 

Losses) 2 8 

Nimick, Wreck of the 3 8 

Agreement Works Well 2 8 

Advice. A Word of 3 8 

Lake Transportation 4 8 

Twelve Years' Losses 4 8 

Cyprus, Loss of the 5-8; 6 8 

Wrecks of the Season 5 8 

Duluth, Shipping of 6 8 

Old Timers on Lakes 6 8 

Oldest Captain, The 9 8 

Lake Delegates to Seamen's Conven- 
tion 9 9 

Value of Lake Fleet 10 8 

Chicago (I. S. U. A.) Convention 14 8 

Delegates to Convention 15 8 

Winter Fleets 15 9 

Strike Clause in Charters 16 8 

Rogers, Record of Steamer 16 8 

Winter Fleets 16 9 

Death List of 1907 17 8 

Benefits Paid by Lake Seamen's Union 

During Season of 1907 17 9 

Work of Lakes Conference 20 8 

Reward for Finding Wreck 21 8 

Cooks and Stewards Delegates to Con 

ference 21 8 



Title No. Page 

Nepotism on the Lakes (By Jakob 

Johansen) 22 8 

Late Opening of the Season (By W. H. 

Jenkins) 22 8 

Vesselowners Oppose Bills (By W. H. 

Jenkins) 23 8 

Prospects of the Season 26 8 

Lake Firemen's Officers 29 8 

Vessels Lost on Lakes 30 8 

Good Judgment Demanded (By Wm. 

H. Jenkins) 31 8 

Meeting with Lumber Carriers 33 8 

"Swell" Crew, New Boat's 33 8 

Electric Name Signs 33 9 

Owners Break Agreement 35 8 

Keep on "Agitating" (By Wm. H. Jen- 
kins) 37 8 

Lake Situation, The 38 8 

Unjustifiable Arrest, An 39 8 

Situation on the Lakes 40 8 

Students Go Scabbing (By Wm. H. 

Jenkins) 41 8 

Wage Reduction Talk 42 8 

Opinion for Masters 43 8 

Bushels of Books 43 8 

Veteran Sailor Complains 44 8 

Opening of Gary 46 8 

Shipping f Cleveland 46 8 

Shipbuilding on Lakes 46 8 

Traffic in Soo Canal 46 8 

Difference of Opinion, A (By Clyde 

Kerr) 47 8 

Up to the Captain (By Wm. H. Jen- 
kins) 47 8 

Why Mates Can't Steer 47 9 

Desperate Device, A 48 8 

Scabbing on the Lakes 50 8 

Conflicting Press Items 51 8 

Penje Exposes Trick 52 8 

"Not Fair to the Men" 52 9 

M. 

Machinery vs. Toil * 27 11 

Madagascar Pearl Fisheries 26 10 

Madagascar Steamship Service 34 11 

Magical Gary 1 10 

Magellan, Passage of 22 3 

Magellan, Towboat Fleet for 24 10 

Magnetic Vessels 1 3 

"Main Obstacle," The 13 6 

Mankind, Kelvin's Services to 23 10 

Manning Question, The 12 6 

Manning of Ships, The 20 11 

Mariners, Some Ancient 3 3 

Marine Architecture 26 3 

Marine, Germany's 31 2 

Marine, Salaries in British 35 3 

Marine Gas Engine 44 11 

Master's Responsibility, The 28 6 

Master Mariner Protests, A (By Joseph 

T. Liddy) 43 7 

Mechanics, Comparison of 1 2 

Meerschaum in New Mexico 34 11 

Merchant Marine, Japanese 27 3 

Merchant Shipping Act, British 35 3 

Metal Workers' Union, German 18 3 

Mexican Labor, Skilled 40 9 

Militia, Strength of 3 4 

Millions Out of the Air 35 10 

Mines. Sweden's 10 9 

Mine Blasting Invention 31 11 

Mines, Rescue Work in 48 11 

Alines, Labor in African 13 9 

Miners, Western Federation of, Member- 
ship 44 14 

Miners, International Congress of 49 4 

Mineral. New. Tts Uses 34 10 

Mississippi, Shackling the 52 3 

Modernizing the Far East 29 10 

Money. Rare Kinds of 23 10 

More Pay for Navy 45 3 

Montreal. Harbor of 47 3 

Moving Pictures in Schools 39 9 

Mover, Charles, Dismissal of Charge 

Against 17 15 

Musicians. Protection of 23 2 

Mutton, To Carry Frozen 22 11 

N. 

Names of Const Places 50 10 

Naval Rnse. British 28 3 

Naval Wireless Telegraph 51 3 

Navies, War Paint on 30 3 

Navigation. Atlantic Inner 29 3 

Navy (United States) Second in Size.... 17 3 

Navy (British) Estimates 25 4 

Navy, About Japan's 29 10 

Navy, Needs of American 31 3 

Navy, Capacity of American 37 10 

Navy, More Pay for 45 3 

Navy, Japanese. Rank of 47 14 

Nelson of the Navy 6 3 

New Bedford's Tost Art (Whaling) 1 

New Guinea, Unknown 7 10 

New Mexico, Meerschaum in 34 11 

Newspaper Rules. Model (The Bee) 23 6 

New York, Shinninc During 1907 17 4 

New York Citv. Value of Real Estate. ... 1" 14 

New Vork Citv. Death Rate of 27 13 

New Zealand. Pensions in 28 

Niagara, Illumination of 9 3 

Niagara of Brazil 21 10 

Nme-Uour Law (Railroad) Goes Into 

Effect 25 15 

Nitrate Combine. Chilean 12 8 

\ T < n'seless Guns 45 11 

Norfolk to San Francisco 43 3 

Norway, Transportation in 24 3 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL [NDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-ONE. 



Title No. Page 

Norwegian Tourist Traffic 16 3 

Norwegian Labor Conditions 17 3 

Norwegian Seamen Organizing 11 7 

Norwegian Whaling Industry 34 7 

North German Lloyd Steamship Com- 
pany, Earnings of 28 4 

North German Lloyd Line, Subsidy for.. 33 13 

North Pole, Elusive 34 3 

Ninth Pule, Peary Sails on Expedition to 43 IS 

O-P 

"Octopus," Serving the I By "EI Tuerto") 29 11 

Odor-, of Tobacco Smoke 4S 3 

Oil Fuel for Ships 48 11 

Oil Fuel for Ships 51 

Oklahoma, Population of 1 4 

Oklahoma, Election in 2 4 

Oklahoma, Admitted as a State 10 4 

Old Bill (By "Hawserlaid Bill") 3 2 

Old Age Pensions (British) ['.ill Passed.. 47 15 

Old Ay,- Pensions 50 11 

O'Neill, J. J., Death of 38-4; 38-6 

One-Thousand-Foot Strainer 38 10 

Overtime, To Abolish 2 12 

Pacific, Future of the 8 9 

Pacific Steamship Activity IX 3 

Pacific Coast Longshoremen 26 7 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Animal 

Report of 37-5: 37-6 

Pacific Coast, Labor Papers of 39 2 

Pacific, The Future of the 39 lo 

Panama Canal, Cost of 1 4 

Panama Canal. Cost of 17 14 

I', mama Canal. Labor Employed on 43 14 

Panama Canal Zone, Population of 51 15 

Parcels Post. British 16 11 

Paris; to .Make a Seaport 19 14 

Pearl Fisheries, Ceylon 15 11 

Pendulum, Swing of the 7 2 

Pensions in Germany 4 10 

Pensions. Amount of Appropriation 21 13 

Pension Fund, Seamen's 22 lO 

Pensions in New Zealand 28 2 

Pension Appropriation Bill Passed 33 14 

Pensions, Old Age 50 11 

Tensions for Members of Typographical 

Union 50 14 

Pensions (United States), Increase of.... 52 14 

Pensions. Number of, in United State-... 7 4 

Perils of London Streets 40 2 

Personal Liberty. For IS 7 

Pelt i hour. Geo. A.. Acquittal of 16-6; 17-15 

Pilot Apprentice Rule. New 29 3 

Pinkerton, Estate of 1 4 

Pirates, Sixteenth Century 15 10 

Plimsoll Mark, The 10 6 

Police Dogs at Antwerp 18 3 

Political Unrest for India 7 3 

Poor, Motel for the 50 11 

Population, Growth of 1 11 

Population, Earth's 4- 2 

Population of Ireland 7 9 

Population of Canada 8 14 

Population of United States 17 14 

Population, German 4S 3 

Population of United States, Increase of. 52 14 

Port, World's Greatest 11 9 

Ports, Distances Between 27 8 

Position Confirmed. A (Labor in Politics) 28 7 

Postal Rate, New Foreign 4 4 

Postal Service, British 5 10 

Postal Employes, British 52 10 

Prices. Wages and 37 2 

Prizes, Husbands as 5 11 

Programme, An Interesting 40 11 

Prohibition and Liquor 19 3 

Prohibition, \n Intemperate Decision.... 27 6 

Proposed Danish Canal 48 3 

Prosperity of Spain 24 11 

Protest, A Timely, Sending Criminals to 

Sea .....' 27 7 

Prussia. Suicides in 31 10 

Public Printer Stillings Suspended 21 IS 

Pump a Sea Dry, To 9 3 

Punta Arenas, About 26 10 

Q-R 

Quebec Bridge, Collapse of, Report on.. 27 13 

Radial Engine 16 10 

Railroads, Accidents on 8 4 

Railroads. Accidents on 20 13 

Railroad. New Silurian 44 2 

Railroad Wages in Great Britain 45 4 

Railway Accidents 3 3 

Railway Schemes Projected 25 3 

Railway Employes, Scotch 48 10 

Rangoon, port Works of 23 2 

Rats. World War on 16 11 

Rattlesnakes, Fallacies ' U >ou( 9 2 

Reawakening of Bruges 8 11 

Recall in Des Moines 4 11 

Relative Positions of Cities 41 11 

Records. Breaking 8 3 

Remote Past. Revelation of 5 2 

Republican Programme 38 3 

Rescue Work in Mines 48 11 

Rest. Italian Day of 41 9 

Retirement of Watson, The 19 3 

Revenue-Cutter Service 31 2 

"Right-Time." No 5 3 

Right to Labor, The 14 6 

Risk of Life. The 34 3 

Romance of Steel. Tin- 24 11 

Russia, Executions in S 14 

Russia, Jews in 18 1 

Russia, Number of Executions in 48 14 



Title No. Page 

Record Passages — 

"Lusitania," Speed Records of 1-15; 3-15; 

4-15; 7-3; 7-15; 8-15; 9 2; 36 15; ,58 15; 5') 15; 

45 15; 4'> 12. 

uretania," Speed Records of. ...6-15- 20-4; 

26-14; 32-4; 58 15; 39-15; l 

Eureka-San Francisco 47 5 

Everett-San Francisco 30 5 

Havre-New York i is 

Hongkong- Yokohama-San Francisco... 42 5 

Hongkong-Port Townsend 49 5 

Port Townsend-San Francisco 29 5 

bec-Cowes, Warship Record 46 14 

Sandy Hook Plymouth 50 12 

United Kingdom-Chile 43 5 



of Life at Sea, Commission mi.... 

Sahara, Transforming the 

Sailed Se> en Mi mths 

Sailing Ships. Return of the 

Sailors, Yachts Developing 

Salaries of Congressmen 

Salaries in British Marine 

Salt Lake, Great 

San Francisco, Population of 

San Francisco Bay (Poem by "Hawser- 
laid Bill") ." 

San Francisco, Chicago and (Fin 
parisons ) 

San Francisco Election, The 

San Francisco, Health of 

Savings Bank Insurance 

Sehc ii ils. Classes in 

Schools, Moving Pictures in 

Science vs. Thei ill igy 

Si i 'i eh l rnemploj ed 

Scotch Railway Employes 

Sea, Encroachments of the 

Sea, Sentiment of l he 

Sea Fi 'oils, French 

Sea Power, Great Britain 

Sea. \nimal I ,ife of the 

Sea Foods, French 

I olor of the 

Sea Serpent Story, A (By "El Tuerto").. 

Seas, Firing Across 

Seamen and War Kisks 

Seamen's Union of Europe 

Seamen's Pension Fund 

Seamen, Supply and Training of 

Seamen, Norwegian, Organizing 

Seamen. News for the 

Seaman. Chambermaid, A 

Seamen's "Institute," A 

Seal Catch of Season 

Sentenced to Sea ! 

Serving "The Octopus" ( By "I'd Tuerto") 

Shackling the Mississippi 

Shanghaiing a Crimp (By "Hawserlaid 

Pill") " 

Ships, Growth of Lake 

Ships, Air to Raise 

Ships or Men? 

The Manning of 

Ship Subsidies. Analysis of Elkins Bill... 

Ships, Coaling at Sea 

Ships. Foreigners "ii British • 

Ships, British, Chinese on 

Ships, American, in Bristol 

Ships. Oil Fuel for 

^hips. ( )ti Fuel for 

Shipbuilding in United States During 1907 

Shipbuilding. World's 

Shipbuilding, German 

Shipboard, Tuberculosis on 

Shipping, State Aid for 

Shipping Casualties 

Shipping a Crew in London 

Shipping Acts, British 

Shipping Rings 

Shipping Increase. Trinidad 

Shipwrecks (World's) in 1907 

Shop Hours in Transvaal 

Siberian Railroad. New 

Sickness, Insurance Against 

Signal, A Combination 

Sixteenth Century Pirates 

Skilled Mexican Labor 

Skyscraper of the Future 

Skyscraper, The First 

Smokeless Coal in England 

(Reed) Sees a Light (By "Haw- 
serlaid Bill") 

Smyrna. Sponge Trade in 

Sound Steamers. New- 

South Going Dry. Is the? 

South Seas. I ,abor in the 

South America's Century 

South Pole Expedition 

Spain, Prosperity of 

Spanish Child Labor 

Spirit of 76. The ( Boycott) 

Sponges in Hawaii 

Sponge Trade iii Smyrna 

Standard Oil Profits' 

Star Boy So m a way 

Statesmen' Battleships or 

Steamer. One-Thousand Foot 

Steamship, Ml Red. Project 

Steamship Rates. Higher 

i>ip Service, Madagascar 

Steel, The Ri nuance of 

Steve Adams. Trial of 

Stoessel, Lieutenant Cen- 
to Death 

1. General. Death Sen; 
muted 



36 
39 

45 
51 
40 
18 
35 
3 
3 



8 

22 
46 

3 
39 
54 
31 
48 

1 
24 
24 
27 
31 
31 
32 
45 
49 

4 

7 
22 
23 
27 
2X 
38 
44 
11 
39 
29 
52 

6 
1 

14 
14 
20 
28 
30 
30 
33 
45 
48 
51 
17 
20 
48 
17 
5 
11 
28 
45 
46 
50 
19 
44 
44 



47 

15 

40 

4 

19 

14 

13 
50 
44 

7 
11 
32 
55 
24 
44 
16 
22 
5o 

2 
SO 
34 
38 
11 
12 
54 
24 
13 

25 



15 

10 

II) 
3 
3 

Id 
3 
3 
4 



3 
6 
6 
3 

11 

9 

10 

11 

10 

3 

1 

2 

3 

10 

11 

3 

2 

3 

3 

6 

10 

11 

7 

3 

9 

6 

5 

6 

11 

3 

2 
8 
3 
6 

11 
1 
3 

11 
1 
9 

11 
3 
4 

14 
3 

11 

11 
9 
2 

11 
11 
11 

1 
11 

2 
11 

3 
10 

9 

9 

3 

9 



2 

2 

10 

10 

11 
11 

6 

11 

11 

4 

3 

6 

10 

3 

9 

11 

11 

15 



27 14 



Title Xo, 

Strike (Austrian) Declared Criminal 17 

Strike Ditisson Hamburg 2<) 

Strikes m I ranee 2!? 

Strikes in Germany 29 

Subsidies and Seamen 20 

Subsidies in Canada ,s_> 

Subsidy Policy, Canada's 5 

Subsidv Talk. More 25 

Subside for North German Llovd Line... 33 
Subsidy, British, Earned by Mauritania 

and Lusitania 3g 

Subsidized Oriental Ships 

Suction, Collision bv, a Myth 21 

Sugar a Powerful Food $2 

Suicides. Statistics of 3 

Suicides in Prussia 3] 

Sunken Fleet, To Raise ,X 

Sweden's Minis io 

Swimming 1 difficulties 9 

Swiss Factory Laws 46 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 
Seamen's Union Enjoined (Hammond) 5 

Chinese (lews. Ruling on 4 

Injunctions ( I lammond >, the Limit in. . 5 

Straus' Ruling (Chinese Crews) 4 

Hammond Injunction, The 5 

Death of B. G. Haskell 9 

Payment .1!" Head Tax 9 

Sentiment of The Sea 24 

Sixth of March, The 24 

Proposed Undermanning Pill 26 

First Coast Seamen's Unions 42 

DECEASED MEMBERS— 

Anderson, Victor 39 

Axelssi in, Karl 24 

Lilian, ( rUStaf Adolph 50 

Berg, Frank 22 

Bjorkman, Fredolf 7 

Bohn, Adolf 14 

Brokman, Christian 25 

Broen, C. W 14 

Carls, m, C. A 9 

Clausen, Clans Ludvig 2 

Cosiell, \!ex 2 

I label, William G 39 

Dixon, Arthur 23 

jers, Benjamin C. Phil 17 

Eliasson, Anton 35 

Flinck, Carl A 28 

Forsman, Constantine Johan 41 

Fredriksen, Fred 6 

1 iabrielson, Marcus 7 

Gallagher, Hiram Ernest 37 

Garboy, Eyvend 37 

Goff, Stephen 52 

is 8 

Griberg, Andrew 24 

i ireiner, Reinhold 7 

Grillish, Joseph 14 

Gustafson, August 25 

Gustafson, Carl Johan....' 22 

Hansen, Finne Olaf 14 

I lansen, Frithjof 19 

Hansen, Ililmar Julius 6 

Hansen, Christopher W 21 

Hansen, Olaf A 27_ 

Hansen. Christian 35 

Hedlund, Gustaf E 14 

I I elander, 1 1 erman 19 

Hellsten, Clans Arthur 40 

Henkel, Johann Richard 18 

Hermanson, Carl A 6 

Hermanson, Carl 17 

II impel, Ernest 22 

lloaran, Leopold Louis 14 

I sack sen. Carl 46 

Jaeger, Andrew 36 

Jensen. Johan Peter Adolf 6 

Jensen, Jens Hansen 35 

Jensen. Andreas 44 

Johansen, Frederick 35 

Johns, .n, Emil 5 

Johnson, Daniel 7 

Johns. m, Harry 16 

ison I '> der 29 

Johnson, Bernhard 33 

Johnson, Nils 34 

nson, A 40 

Knudson, Albert 9 

Koske, Albert 35 

Laine, Nils 20 

Larseii. Iljalmar Christian 4 

I.asander. Andrew SO 

Lennan, Patrick 41 

I .epp. Edward 17 

Levaque, Eugene 36 

Lie. Sigurd Henry 4 

Mahoiiey. John 29 

Matusewitsch, Joseph 35 

McEwan, Roy Chester 36 

McKen. i lharli - 18 

Nielsen, C. 47 

Nilsson, Charles 1 4 

Nilsen, Julius 11 

Nyblom, losepli 20 

. Allen B 6 

Olsen, Peter Albert 11 

Olsen, Anton 33 

Panusch, Peter 35 

Peti i sen, Gustaf 37 

Powers. Frank 29 

Rampanen, Thos 10 

Reehan, Henry S 36 

Reinholm, Carl 30 

Rosqvist, Olaf 35 

Salonen, Edward 31 



:ige 

12 

in 

12 

11 

6 

in 

3 

6 

13 

15 

10 

s 

10 

4 

in 

3 

9 

10 

11 



6 
1 

6 
6 
1 
6 
11 
1 
6 
6 
1 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-ONE. 



Title Xo. Page 

Sandvik, John 20 7 

Sands, Harold H 22 7 

Schreier, Andrew 52 7 

Schweickart, John Frederick 19 7 

Sortvedt, Ole 23 7 

Stolpe, Charles 28 7 

Strand, Einar 3 7 

Sunberg, August Henry 37 7 

Svensson, August 29 7 

S vennsson, Wilhelm 38 7 

Talbot, Herbert 36 7 

Thompson, Robert 37 7 

Thorsen, Olaf 10 7 

Wahlstrom, Axel Edward 22 7 

VValvas, Peter 15 7 

Wenner, Edward 39 7 

Westerlund, Peter 23 7 

Wilder, Thos 9 7 

Willis, Fred 27 7 

Wirken, John 15 7 

Woodroof, Charles 24 7 

T 

Taft on Exclusion 41 6 

Telegraph Operators, Women 31 2 

Telegraphers, Help The 2 6 

Telegraphers, Appeal For 2 11 

Telegraph, Naval Wireless 51 3 

Territories, Trade With 42 11 

Theatrical Performances on Transatlantic 

Liners 5 15 

Theology, Science vs 34 10 

Thrift of Italian Immigrants 34 10 

Tidal Waves, Artificial 35 3 

Tidal Power, Using 49 3 

Trade-Union Congress, British 6 1 

Trade-Unions In Europe 26 11 

Trade-Union League, Women's 47 10 

Trade-Unions In Germany 48 2 

Trade-Union Acts 52 11 

Trade-Unionism in Europe 15 2 

Transforming the Sahara 39 10 

Transportation in Norway 24 3 

Transvaal, Gold Field Of 27 14 

Transvaal, Shop Hours in 44 11 

Travel By Water 38 2 

Treasure, Discovery Of Buried 50 3 

Trinidad Shipping Increase 50 11 

Tropics, Liquors In The 35 2 

True Significance Of Liberty 42 9 

Tobacco In the United States 34 6 

Tobacco, Defense Of, 47 10 

Tobacco Smoke, Odors Of 48 3 

Tonnage, British 24 3 

Topolobampo, Opening Of 23 2 

Torpedo-Boat, Speed Record Broken.... 10 14 

Torpedo-Boat Speed Record 15 4 

Tourist-Traffic. Norwegian 16 3 

Tow-Barges, Numerous Wrecks of 21 4 

Towboat Fleet For Magellan 24 10 

Tuberculosis On Shipboard 17 11 

Turbines, German Criticism Of 14 3 

Typographical Union, Pensions For 

Members ! 50 14 

Typothctae Attends Funeral 2 10 

U-V 

Undermanning Bill, Proposed 26 6 

Unemployed, Blood-Money and the 24 2 

Unemployed, Scotch 31 11 

Unemployed, The German 39 11 

Unemployed In Europe 52 10 

United States, Population Of 17 14 

United States, Tobacco In The 34 6 

United States, Illiteracy In.'. 47 11 

United States, Increase Of Population... 52 14 

United States, Increase Of Pensions 52 14 

United Kingdom, Liquor Used In 5 2 

United Mine Workers of America, T. L. 

Lewis Elected President 16-15; 22-15; 23-6 

Unions, Gibbons on the 4 6 

Upper Amazon, The 23 11 

Urban Growth in Germany 38 11 

Utilization Of The Mind 37 2 

Van Schaick, Captain William II. Sen- 
tenced to Imprisonment 22 14 



Title No. Page 

Van Schaick's Pardon, Seeking 26-6; 42-3 

Venice, Gondoliers Of 27 2 

Vessels, Magnetic 1 3 

Victims Of Fourth Of July 52 14 

Vital Statistics. French 23 3 

Volcanoes, Earthquakes and 1 11 

W-X-Y-Z 

Wall, Great, of The Andes 35 11 

Walrus and Narwhal Tusks 12 11 

War Risks, Seamen and 4 3 

War Paints On Navies 30 3 

Washington ( D. C.) Labor Speaks (Pub- 
lic Printer Stillings) 2 2 

Water On The Desert 23 3 

Water, Harbor Lights Under 31 3 

Waterway To The Gulf 5 3 

Wages In Japan 30 10 

Wages In England 34 2 

Wages Regulated By Law 34 11 

Wages and Prices 37 2 

Wages, German Ironworkers 44 10 

Wages, Railroad, in Great Britain 45 4 

Wages, Average of Labor, 1907 45 14 

Wealth, Growth in 3 11 

Wealth, Display of Modern 31 3 

Welcome "The Seaman" 12 6 

Welcome, The Fleet! 33 6 

Welcome Awaiting. A 47 7 

Whale Catch of Season 15 5 

Whale, The Blue 19 11 

Whaling, New Bedford's Lost Art 1 3 

Whaling Industry, Norwegian 34 7 

White Star Liners, New 32 4 

William's (German Emperor) Peace Rec- 
ord 16 10 

Winch Improvement, A 31 11 

Wind, Electricity From 16 11 

Wind, Utilization of The 37 2 

Wireless Across Atlantic 3 3 

Wireless, Opening of Transatlantic Serv- 
ice 5 4 

Wireless Stations, Caribbean 37 10 

Wireless Telegraph, Naval 51 3 

Women In Industry 21 11 

Women Teachers, Pay of 27 2 

Women Telegraph Operators 31 2 

Women In German Industries 34 11 

Women Workers In France 37 14 

Women in British Factories 46 2 

Women's Trade-Union League 47 10 

Women Workers In Australia 50 4 

Woodpile, The American 37 9 

Workers, Health of British 13 3 

World War On Rats 16 11 

World's Greatest Port 11 9 

World's Output of Iron Ore 20 3 

World's Shipbuilding 20 14 

Yachts, Cost of 1 3 

Yacht Race, Bermuda 40 3 

Yachts Developing Sailors 49 3 

Wrecks — 

"Adolph Obrig" 45 5 

"Aeon" 48-5; 49-5; 51-5 

"Alacrita" 25 14 

"Alcaea" 27 4 

"Alkaline" 21 4 

"Alphild" 11 15 

"Anna" 8 15 

"Anubis" 48-5; 49-5 

"Aguila" 21 4 

"Arthur Sewall" ..17-4; 18-5; 30-4 

"Ascam Woermann" 20 14 

"Auburndale" 52 12 

"Azlak" 23 4 

"Bakkelagat" 45 13 

"Baltimore" 25 14 

"Bangalore" 41-5; 44-5; 46-5 

"Berkeley" 9-5; 30-5 

"Berwick" 27 5 

"Bessie A" 35 15 

"Cacique" 33-5; 36-15 

"Carncdd Llewellyn" 52 5 

"Carrie and Annie" 7 5 



Title 



No. Page 



"Castle Rock" 19-5; 32-5 

"Charles K. Schull" 47-4; 48-4 

"Clara Nevada" 26 5 

"Corona" 32-5; 45-5; 50-5; 51-5 

"Cypress" 5-8; 6-8 

"Decorra" 2 15 

"Dunearn" 51 13 

"Eclipse" 21 5 

"Edith R. Balcom" 28 5 

"Ella G" 24 5 

"Emma Claudina" 16 5 

"Emily E. Birdsall" 25 14 

"Emily Reed" 22-5; 23-5; 25-5 

"Edward J. Berwind" 22 14 

"Edward Phinney" 16 4 

"Ester" 52 5 

"Europa" 43 15 

"Falklandbank" 42 5 

"Fawn" 14 5 

"Florencio Rodriguez" 44 13 

"Folge Fonded" 50 13 

"Frances Hyde" 23 14 

"Frithjof" 4 15 

"Galena" 35 5 

"Gardiner B. Reynolds" 17 4 

"George Weems" 37 15 

"Germanic" 16 4 

"Gladiator" 33 4 

"Glen" 8 5 

"Golden Rule" 50 12 

"Goto Maru" 18 5 

"Grand Lake" 32 4 

"Guiana" 5 5 

"Hartford" 26 5 

"Helene Blum" 40 5 

"H. G. Johnson" 33 4 

"Isla de Panay" 27 14 

"Ida Schnauer" 40-5; 42-5 

"Jesse Barlow" 15 4 

"John E. Devlin" 20 4 

"John Currier" 1-5; 2-5 

"John F. Miller" 26-5: 30-5 

"John Wilbore" 6 7 

"Kirkwall" 47 14 

"La Rache" 42 13 

"Latona" 36 13 

"Leon XIII" 3 5 

"Leonora" 20 4 

"Luamyron" 37 13 

"Lucile" 52 5 

"Maggie and May" 47 4 

"Martha W. Tuft" 5 5 

"Mary E. Smith" 4 15 

"Melrose" 24 14 

"Mildred" 27 5 

"Minnie E. Kelton" 

..34-5; 37-5; 38-7; 40-5; 42-5; 44-5; 46-5 

"Montscrrat," "Keewenaw" and "Ivan- 
hoe" 38 5 

"Norwood" 34 4 

"Palmyra" 49 5 

"Peter Rickmers" 34 4 

"Pomona" 27-5; 29-5; 31-5; 43-5 

"Premier" 47 4 

"Princess Yolando" 2 14 

"Prussia" 14 5 

"Queen Christina" 6 5 

"Richard S. Learning" 19 4 

"Roda" 25 14 

"San Jose" 19 4 

"Saratoga" 38-5; 42-5 

"Servia" 9 5 

"Silberhorn" 39 5 

"Strathorn" 35 15 

"St. Cuthbert" 21 4 

"Sunniva" 14 4 

"Tellus" 2-5; 3-5 

"Thomas W. Lawson" 14-8; 16 4: 17-6 

"Thomas A. Ward" 15 4 

"Tillie E. Starbuck" 7 5 

"Titania" 48 4 

Tow-Barges Lost 21 4 

"Vine" 2 5 

"Vinita" 12 15 

"William Bavliss" 43 5 

"William H. Skinner" 26 14 









. 




^S;^^SS^SSS^SS^^h^^ii^^^^^^S 



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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXI, No. 1 . 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1907. 



Whole No. 1 04 1 . 



OUR "COMING OF AGE." 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL enters 
upon its twenty-first year with the present 
issue. The occasion seems to justify more 
extended notice than is customary at the open- 
ing of a new volume. 

Progress in human affairs is usually marked by 
the annual recurrence of the birthday of a given 
event. Once a year mankind, either in an in- 
dividual capacity or in world-wide agreement, 
pauses to note the coming again of that date 
which marks the birth of a new life, a new 
thought, a new institution, to mark the fruits 
thereof and to derive new inspiration from the 
event. 

By way of varying the proceeding, at the same 
time adding new emphasis to it, we are accus- 
tomed to group the years into periods, longer or 
sin uter, according to the character of the events 
noted. The discovery of a continent, the estab- 
lishment of a nation, the invention of a device in 
mechanics, every great achievement constituting 
an epoch in the progress of the world, is hon- 
ored more or less generally by a pause in the 
daily course of thought and action, in order that 
results may be computed and prospects reason- 
ably anticipated. 

The most familiar, because most human, of 
these periods of reflection and improvement is 
that by which we signalize the maturing of 
human life. With his twenty-first birthday man 
"comes of age"; thenceforth he is the maker of 
his own destiny, responsible to his Creator and 
the world for his every thought, word and deed. 
Standing upon the threshold of full responsibility, 
legal and moral, man observes his twenty-first 
birthday as the coming of that age when he 
must bid farewell to those counsels of authority 
which he has so far deferred to and leaned upon, 
and go out into the world with only his own 
arms as protectors, his own courage as an in- 
spiration and his own conscience as a light in the 
path of duty. Parents, relatives and friends as- 
semble to give him a "Good voyage!" Affec- 
tion, counsel, friendship — these go with him on 
his journey, but they go in spirit, rather than 
in form, the form of authority to correct or to 
make amends. Next to that day upon which 
man must render a final accounting of his mis- 
sion in life, the day upon which he "conies of 
age" is the most significant in his career. For- 
tunate is he who, in reviewing the period of 
childhood and adolescence, finds in its training 
and teachings the groundwork of a career use- 
ful to himself and his fellowman. Thrice fortu- 
nate is he if, in that crucial moment, he can look 
himself in the face and say that he has taken to 
heart the lessons of his youth and endeavored 
to practice them in the daily associations of life. 

With the beginning of its twenty-first year the 
Journal "comes of age." The significance of this 
period in the life of any. journal is properly re- 
garded as of a kind with that attaching to the 
same period in a human life, for the reason that 
newspapers are essentially a human product, a 
mouthpiece of the human mind. All ordinary 
comparison between the attributes of the press 
and of human nature are the more striking in 
proportion as the particular publications are rep- 
resentative of their publishers and readers. So 
regarded, the Journal is part and parcel of the 
lives of ihc.se by whom and for whom it is pub- 



lished, namely, the seamen of the country and of 
the world. The birthday anniversary of the 
Journal is an event of "human interest" equal in 
all the respects that make human birthdays note- 
worthy with that of any of the men for whose 
benefit it is published. The birthday of the 
Journal is, in a sense, the birthday of the sea- 
men, since that event marks in large measure 
the coming to life of a new spirit and a new 
hope in that craft. It seems, therefore, that the 
present occasion justifies a brief review of the 
Journal's work from its inception to the present 
time. 

The establishment of the Journal may be said 
to have been contemporaneous with the estab- 
lishment of organization among seamen on the 
Pacific Coast, which, in turn, means the estab- 
lishment of organization among the seamen of 
the world. Efforts to organize the seafaring 
craft — efforts more or less successful, and more 
or less enduring — had been made in various lo- 
calities and at various times. We deem it safe 
to say, however, that the organization formed in 
1885 by the seamen of the Pacific Coast is the 
first instance on record of sustained and effective 
action of the kind. With the first fruits of or- 
ganization among the seamen there arose a de- 
mand for some means of adequately expressing 
the sense of the craft upon matters affecting its 
interests. In those days, when hope ran high 
and action followed fast in the train of thought, 
the conception of a publication that should speak 
for and of the seamen in a manner worthy their 
real sentiments was hailed with general ap- 
proval. Accordingly the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal was established. The first issue appeared 
on November 2, 1887. Every week thereafter 
the Journal has carried its message to the 
seamen of the world and their friends, not ex- 
cepting the weeks immediately following the 
great catastrophe in San Francisco, during which 
every other weekly publication was suspended 
for a time. Throughout that period the Journal 
has been, as it were, the seamen's flag and bea- 
con-light. In prosperity and in adversity it has 
been as a sign in the heavens, so far as human 
power could make it so, to the seaman in every 
part of the world. Whenever, in times of stress, 
it has been suggested that publication should be 
stopped, the seamen have given answer: "Keep 
our signal for closer battle flying!" And so the 
Journal has been kept at the masthead, a sign 
and symbol of faith and determination in the 
cause of justice for the men who "go down to 
the sea in ships." 

The Journal was founded upon certain well- 
delined ideas: First, it was determined that the 
paper should be conducted exclusively by prac- 
tical seamen, members of the Union, and that it 
should always remain the property of that or- 
ganization. Secondly, the idea of publication was 
that of educating the public to a proper concep- 
tion of the seaman's character, his true standing 
as a social and economic factor a'nd his needs 
as such. Thirdly, it was believed that such a 
publication would accomplish much of educa- 
tional value to the seaman himself. To under 
stand the importance of these objects it must be 
remembered that up to the time of the publica- 
tion of the Journal the wor'd was absolutely 
without any mean- of judging the seaman's char- 
acter or needs, if we except the means used by 



his enemies or, what is much the same in prac- 
tical effect, his mistaken friends. The seaman 
was voiceless, or if he spoke at all, it was 
through the medium of publications designed to 
amuse rather than instruct. The seaman had 
been written and sung about until he had be- 
come a laughing stock, an object of contempt, 
among his fellows on land. 

This state of public opinion constituted an in- 
surmountable barrier to that confidence and es- 
teem which is necessary to the progress of any 
element of the people. The establishment of the 
Journal was determined upon in order that the 
seaman might have true representation in the 
press, to the end that the press and public gener- 
ally might have an opportunity of judging the 
seaman at his true worth. The seamen felt that 
whatever the results, whether creditable or oth- 
erwise, from a journalistic or personal stand- 
point, the Journal would at least do them the 
justice of representing them as they really arc, 
not as they are pictured, and in fact caricatured, 
in other prints. With this object in view it was 
determined that the Journal should be edited and 
conducted in every department, except the purely 
mechanical, by practical seamen, men qualified 
to express the seaman's views by virtue of their 
own experience. 

In this early period of organization among the 
seamen it was recognized that the need of edu- 
cation among themselves was as important as 
the need of educating the public. The seamen 
realized that to succeed in the labor movement 
they needed to learn the history of that move- 
ment, its origin, objects and methods. The sea- 
men realized, too, that to succeed in improving 
the conditions of their daily lives they needed to 
understand these conditions, not only in their 
practical application, but in their legal and eco- 
nomic aspects. The Journal was established as 
a necessary means of achieving these objects. 
Underlying these ideas and in reality dominating 
them, although perhaps not so definitely ex- 
pressed, was the conception of a paper that 
should serve as a medium of communication be- 
tween the seamen of all localities and countries. 
The idea that inspired the organization of the 
seamen, in 1885, namely, that of uniting the sea- 
men of the world in one great fraternity — the 
Brotherhood of the Sea — was followed in the es- 
tablishment of the Journal, as a means by which 
the seamen in all the ports of the world might 
he kept in touch with each other, thus affording 
a common source of authority and information 
and a common center of interest. Tn addition to 
all this, there existed a sense of responsibility to 
the labor movement at large. The seamen recog- 
nized the truth of the axiom that improvement 
in tin- conditions of any given craft, to be per 
manent, must be accompanied by improvement in 
the conditions of all other crafts. Accordingly, 
in establishing the Journal they determined that 
it should take a lively interest in the affairs of 
the labor world, that it should speak for the sea- 
men, not only as seamen, but also as members 
of the labor movement, and that in all that it 
said it should seek to serve the interests of the 
seamen, not at the expense of any other craft, 
but in conformity with the interests of all other 
crafts. 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CoMPAKibUlM OF MECHANICS. 



An English mechanic, in comparing the 
conditions in American machine shops with 
those in England, seems to rind decidedly 
in iavor of this country, in Cassier's Mag- 
azine he says : 

"The American workman is a man who 
is well informed and 1 found quite a num- 
ber who were very keen on inquiring into 
industrial conditions existing in England. 
Didn't i think a man who ran two machines 
in the States for $18 a week is better off 
than a full-fledged mechanic who got £2 a 
week in England? 

"When I had thought the thing over and 
lived there for a time 1 was compelled to 
admit that, as far as my observation went, 
the American had the best of the deal. He 
would take it this way, $18 a week is about 
/.is., then take 25s. for board and lodging 
in the States, this left 50s. 

'Then take the Englishman's wage, 40s. 
a week, less 15s. for board and lodging; this 
left 25s. Here is a difference of 100 per 
cent. That many things are dearer in the 
States than m England 1 admit, but having 
tried both, the American with the 50 shill- 
ings left is the better off. 

"in most cases the housing accommoda- 
tion is better for the American, the rent is 
very little above that of the large towns 
in England, while if the districts are new, 
such inducements as free taxes, free water, 
etc., for about three years are offered, and 
land freehold is quite as cheap in the States 
as in England. 

"Clothes cost more money, and the cloth 
in the States is not so good a quality as 
we might get in England, but the American 
will most likely buy three new suits to the 
Englishman's one, and will pay from $20 
to $25 for each. 1 did not find prices of do- 
mestic stuff much higher than in England. 

"I must confess that I very quickly fell 
into American ways. First of all, break- 
fast about 6:30 a. m., and begin work at 
7 a. m. ; then stop at 12 o'clock for dinner, 
and work again from 1 o'clock till 6 p. m., 
and on Saturdays from 7 till 12, and fifteen 
minutes allowed to clean up machines. 

"This time seemed to me to be a sort of 
standard in use all over the country, and for 
my own part I think it a very much better 
method than beginning work at 6 o'clock 
and working until 8:30 before having any 
breakfast. The American style gives only 
one break in the day, and the breakfast puts 
some steam into a man to help him with 
his work. He does not want to watch the 
clock to see how long it will be before he 
can get something to eat. 

"Both systems, I dare say, have their 
good points, but I believe in the old proverb 
which says, 'A job well begun is half done,' 
and I fail to see how a day's work can be 
well begun when one has to turn out of a 
comfortable bed (in winter especially at 5 
o'clock and possibly walk from one to two 
miles and then do two hours' work with 
an empty stomach. 

"Furthermore, there is the saving of gas 
or electricity for the first hour, and in fact 
in America it always seemed to me that 
the atmosphere was clearer in the winter 
months and the need for artificial light 
much less than in England. 

"The question of warming and ventilat- 
ing the workshop is one that has come in 
for a great deal of discussion. I found all 
the American shops nicely warmed; in fact 



i' i me they seemed hot, the temperature fre- 
quently being from 70 to 75 degrees. The 
American workman likes a warm shop, and 
even at 75 degrees he does not show any 
signs of discomfort ; but to the English- 
man this temperature is too high; GO de- 
grees is as much as he would like." — New 
York Sun. 



BURIAL INSURANCE IN VIENNA. 



DIAMONDS BY THE TON. 



The Pall Mall Gazette says that, "like all 
precious metals and stones, the unit of 
weight usually employed in regard to dia- 
monds is the carat, of which 151^ go to 
make up a single ounce. To think of sacks 
of diamonds by the ton staggers the imagi- 
nation ; indeed, the average annual output of 
the Kimberley mines is not more than half 
a ton, all told. Statistics have been pub- 
lished recently at Cape Town giving the out- 
put for several years past of the Kimberley 
mines and the river diggings. These yield- 
ed in the three years, 1903-05, nearly 7,250,- 
000 carats, say a ton and a half. The mone- 
tary value of these diamonds was £14,450,- 
000. Since the first diamond was discov- 
ered by the banks of the Vaal in 1867 down 
to the end of 1906, it is estimated that the 
total weight of diamonds extracted from 
the Griqualand mines is over thirteen and 
a half ton, of a market value of fully 
£95,000,000. If statistics of this sort can 
be trusted — and in the case of the South 
African yield they closely approximate to 
the facts — only seventeen tons of diamonds 
had been mined all over the world to the 
end of 1901. With the same relative out- 
put since that year from Brazil and India 
the world's output of diamonds is now 
more than twenty tons. The figure seems 
small, considering the ages diamonds have 
been worked in India and elsewhere in the 
East, and must be largely guesswork with 
respect to the output in antiquity. It is, 
however, certain that more diamonds have 
been placed on the market in the last forty 
than in the previous thousand years." 



HIGH-SPEED DESTROYER. 



There was launched on February 16, 
1907, a new torpedo boat at one of the Bir- 
kenhead (Eng.) shipyards which will be 
the fastest torpedo destroyer in the British 
Navy, and it is believed in the world, as she 
is expected to maintain a speed of 35 knots 
an hour "up or down." This craft is the 
first naval vessel of her kind to be propelled 
by turbine machinery of the Parsons type, 
and she will have triple screws. One of the 
most interesting and important facts in con- 
nection with this new torpedo destroyer is 
that certain novelties are to be introduced 
in her machinery and in connection with oil 
fuel, the results of which, it is believed, will 
enable the vessel to attain a speed which 
has never been attained before on the sea. 
The length of the vessel is 270 feet, breadth 
K) feet, depth 15 feet 5 inches, and her 
builder's measurement is 914 tons. 



FOUND! 

A valuable document, supposed to be the 
property of M. J. Madsen, of the Marine 
Firemen, Oilers and Water Tenders' Union. 
Owner can have same by applying to Santiago 
Maneiro, 1312 Montgomery street, near 
Green, San Francisco. 



Municipalization is cartied further in Vi- 
enna, Austria, than in any other city on 
the Continent. Not content with buying, 
out the principal undertaking companies and 
monopolizing the funeral business, the city 
authorities have gone a step further. They 
have introduced a system of burial insur- 
ance by which folk will be able to shuffle 
oft this mortal coil without putting their 
relatives to any expense. The premiums are 
so graded that the insured can arrange for 
simple or stylish obsequies, cheap or dear 
graves, a plain headstone or a monument, 
the inscription on which he may himself 
select. If he desires it, by paying an addi- 
tional sum, he may enjoy the felicity of 
knowing that for all future time his grave 
will be kept green. 

All this is to be carried out through the 
medium of the Emperor Francis Joseph Ju- 
bilee Life Insurance Company, an institu- 
tion which forms yet another department of 
the city's municipal activity. The insur- 
ance covering funerals and graves will be 
divided into ten classes, the monthly pre- 
miums in which will range from 40 hellers 
(8c) to 9 kronen ($1.87). 

The insured must be between the ages 
of 18 and 50, in good health, and not en- 
gaged in any dangerous occupation. In the 
event of death occurring within six months 
from the date of insurance, the policy will 
be void, and the premiums paid will be re- 
turned. Separate insurances must be effected 
for monuments, the premiums for which 
will range from 1 kronen (20c) to 16 kronen 
($3.33) a month. And finally, by payment 
of a capital sum, the company will agree to 
keep graves in order and to decorate and 
illuminate them on the feast of All Souls in 
every year, so long as the cemetery is in 
existence. 

This latest venture in the field of munici- 
pal enterprise is interesting for the various 
burial societies already formed in the city. 
And it also promises to be interesting for 
the monumental masons. As the city now 
owns extensive stone quarries, it is thought 
not unlikely that its next step will be to 
engage in the business of manufacturing 
and erecting funeral monuments. 



According to statistics just published by 
Lloyd's Register, the merchant fleets of the 
globe now total 39,438,000 tons, or nearly 
2,000,000 more than a year ago. Of this huge 
total no less than 33,969,000 tons represent 
steam shipping, and 17,001,000 tons of it is 
under the British flag. All the principal mari- 
time countries have added to their merchant 
navies except Spain. The increase in the case 
of France is nominal. 



The British steamship Moraites left Athens 
for New York direct June 29. This steamer is 
described as being of 12,000 tons, double 
screws, speed 16 knots, and it is said that she 
has an American certificate authorizing her to 
carry passengers. It is reported that a second 
steamer has been ordered and will be ready in 
December. 



About 100,000 nets are in use during the 
herring season by the 800 fishing smacks of 
the Netherlands. A net lasts about three sea- 
sons, but owing to losses from storms and 
other causes between 40,000 and 50,000 new 
nets are purchased annually. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



3 













*^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions) 




*^^* 













NEW BEDFORD'S LOST ART. 



Twenty-five thousand mill operatives will 
be the chief participants in the New Bed- 
ford old-home week, which began recently. 

Half a century ago the main figures in 
such a celebration would have been the crews 
of the whaling fleets which carried the re- 
nown of New Bedford and Nantucket 
around the world. Where be now the Cap- 
tain Ahabs and the Captain Bildads, the 
Cape Codmen, the Gayheaders, the occas- 
ional cannibal sailors picked up on the South 
Sea Islands? Gayhead, whence the unerring 
Indian harpooners came, has dwindled to a 
hamlet of 170 souls. The dark-skinned sail- 
ors from the Azores, who in Melville's time 
made up the complements of the crews, sur- 
vive in the "Portuguese" who now man the 
few vessels of the decayed industry. 

The two whaling craft fitting out at New 
Bedford for a cruise will lend an old-time 
flavor to the celebration. Are the little 
bethels with their mournful memorial tab- 
lets to sons and husbands lost in the North 
seas still standing, or any of the Try-Pot 
inns, at which whalingmen ashore found a 
secure haven between their three years' 
cruises? 

Nantucket sent out the first American 
whalers, soon losing its prestige to New Bed- 
ford, which for a century was the world's 
great whaling port. Ten years before the 
Rockefellers were beginning the business 
which was to end the whalers' usefulness 
that industry gave employment to 750 ves- 
sels, valued at $20,000,000, and carrying 
crews numbering 18,000. The yearly har- 
vest of whales yielded $7,000,000. What na- 
tion has had a hardier seafaring race? "Not 
a sea but was vexed by their fisheries." In 
their pursuit of the whale they rounded 
Cape Horn as if it were Montauk point and 
explored the Pacific to northern latitudes. 

Does not the Columbia River perpetuate 
the name of an adventurous Boston sea cap- 
tain's boat? Some of the spirit of a Fro- 
bisher or a Captain Cook lived again in the 
God-fearing Quaker whaling masters of 
Nantucket and New Bedford. — New York 
World. 



COST OF YACHTS. 



Twenty-five dollars an hour seems a big 
amount to pay for one's pleasure, but with 
the millionaire expense is of no considera- 
tion where his comfort is concerned. He 
has taken to yachts with a zeal that is in- 
creasing every year, and his floating home 
is a marvel of beauty — his "supreme lux- 
ury," as it is well styled by Captain James 
Colling Summers in an article in the cur- 
rent Broadway Magazine. 

There are registered in the United States, 
says Captain Summers, over 1200 sea-going 
steam yachts, representing approximately 
$60,000,000. Of these more than 300 fly the 
flag of the New York Yacht Club. Others 
steam under the colors of the Corinthian 
Yacht Club of Marblehead or the Atlantic 
Yacht or smaller clubs. There are more 
steam yachts registered in this country than 
in England or France or Germany. 

Probably not one of the dozen big steam 
yachts in the New York Yacht Club fleet 



cost to build and equip less than half a mil- 
lion. But the cost of maintenance is quite 
another story. No one knows, of course, 
just how much it costs Mr. Morgan to keep 
the Corsair going. But if such a yacht, for 
example, carrying a crew of sixty men, is 
kept in commisison for six months out of 
the twelve, the payroll will run close to 
$30,000. To feed the crew, to pay the coal 
and oil, for docking and other such neces- 
sary expenses, will call for an expenditure 
of from $30,000 to $50,000 or more. Then 
there is the expense of entertaining the 
owner, his family and his guests on cruise, 
a matter of $20,000, bringing the total cost 
per season very near the hundred thousand 
mark. Never in all history was another 
such costly and luxurious vehicle. Any 
one of a dozen American yachts now skim- 
ming the seven seas is costing its owner 
from $15,000 to $20,000 a month. This 
means an outlay running from $500 to $700 
a day, or approximately $25 an hour. If 
the owner is entertaining a party of eight 
persons on a foreign cruise, exactly $70 a 
day, or $5600 for the cruise is spent on each 
individual guest. 



MAGNETIC VESSELS. 



An interesting paper was recently read on 
the "Magnetic Character of Vessels," by 
Captain VV. Bartling, I. N. R., before the 
Northeast Coast Institution of Engineers 
and Shipbuilders. The first portion of it 
dealt with some experiments carried out dur- 
ing the construction of the steamship Thue- 
ringen at the works of the Weser Shipbuild- 
ing Company, of Bremen, says the Engineer. 
The first observation, which was taken ten 
weeks after the double bottom was built and 
riveted, showed the polaric power of the 
ship to be 25 per cent. A month later, when 
more material had been built in, the induc- 
tion had advanced to about 34 per cent., and 
so on, until when the vessel was ready for 
launching she was a magnet of considerable 
power, having about 57 per cent of the hori- 
zontal magnetic power of the earth. Then, 
when launched, the vessel was swung into a 
position very nearly diametrically opposite 
to that in which she was built. The result 
was that the magnetic power decreased from 
day to day — considerably quicker, it may 
be mentioned, than it had grown — until, 
after 20 days, it was only 15 per cent, of the 
earth's power. As a consequence of this, 
the standard compass on the flying bridge 
went to sea without a compensating magnet, 
and the steering compass, which was also on 
the flying bridge, only needed one compen- 
sating magnet. It is interesting to compare 
these results with those obtained with a sis- 
ter vessel. When launched the magnetic 
conditions of the second vessel were found 
to be practically the same as those of the 
first. The vessel, however, was not swung, 
and her head during completion pointed in 
exactly the same direction as during build- 
ing. The magnetic power continually in- 
creased, and finally reached a value of 68 
per cent, of the earth's power. Conse- 
quently, no less than seven compensating 
magnets were required in the compass, this, 
of course, impairing its efficiency. 



ENCROACHMENTS OF THE SEA. 



Now that a Royal Commission on Coast 
Erosion is trying to find some way to save 
enough of England from the waves to sup- 
ply a site for the headquarters from which 
to govern the rest of the British Empire, it 
may be remarked without any appearance 
of seeking to bear seaside real estate that 
the final revisions of geography were not 
made by the great cataclysms of the remote 
past. The hungry sea, forever gnawing at 
its coasts, is working changes in continents 
and islands which, measured by geological 
standards, are rapid. 

If processes now active should be con- 
tinued uninterruptedly the time is near at 
hand, by the geological calendar, when some 
extraordinary transformations will have 
been wrought on the face of the earth. If 
it were possible for mortal perception to 
penetrate the future perhaps steamships 
might be seen plowing the waters over the 
very spots where Galveston, New Orleans, 
Savannah and Charleston now stand on their 
way to wharves far inland from the present 
coast line. Perhaps the long swell of the 
ocean might be seen rolling across what are 
now Long Island and Manhattan Island to 
break upon the Palisades. Perhaps Holland 
might once more form a part of the floor of 
the North Sea. Berlin and Paris might be 
the chief seaports of Germany and France 
instead of Hamburg and Havre, long since 
submerged. 

This is not a prophecy, nor are the possi- 
bilities outlined so preposterous as at first 
glance they might appear. Many more mar- 
velous metamorphoses have taken place in 
this hoary old world since it first began its 
circuit round the sun. Plato tells a story 
which is corroborated by a vast amount of 
circumstantial evidence at least as worthy 
of credence as expert medical testimony at 
a murder trial, of an island continent in the 
ocean off the entrance to the Mediterranean 
which was the cradle of civilization. Its 
people were the conquerors of Europe and 
Egypt, the colonizers of the Americas, the 
progenitors of the Moundbuilders and the 
Aztecs. This island, which Plato calls At- 
lantis, with all its inhabitants, was swal- 
lowed by the sea at a single gulp in one 
dread day and night. 

An article which relates some extraordi- 
nary facts follows, in which the writer tells 
of efforts being made for the prevention of 
the sea's ravages. It is well illustrated with 
photographs. — Charles Frederick Carter, in 
Technical World Magazine. 



A Para journal reports that the North of 
Brazil Railroad Company has contracted for 
the importation of 1,800 Chinese coolies for 
work on the railroad from Alcobaca to Praira 
da Rainha. The coolies are said to come from 
the Foo Chow district. 



British manufacturers are discussing the ad- 
visability of establishing an industrial bank, 
one of the conditions of foreign loans to be 
that a part of the money shall be spent in 
England, as a means of advancing the inter- 
ests of industrial enterprises. 



COAST SEAMEN'S jol'RNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Cliff House, at San Francisco, 
was destroyed by fire on September 
7. 

Robert Allan Pinkerton, of the 
Pinkerton Detective Agency, left an 
estate amounting to $3,000,000. His 
will gives it to his wife and children. 

Attorney-General Bonaparte, in an 
address before the National Prison 
Congress at Chicago, 111., on Septem- 
ber 18, advocated the death penalty 
for habitual criminals. 

Ninety-five million bushels of wheat 
is the official estimate of the 1907 

crop in Canada'.- three great wheat 

growing provinces of Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan and Alberta. 

Judges Wilson and Andenreid, ill 

the Common Pleas Court at Phila- 
delphia. Pa., declared unconstitutional 
the Two-Cent Railroad hare law- 
passed by the last Legislature. 

The Panama Canal has cost Amer- 
ica $84,449,000 up to December 31, 
1906, according to a statement of the 
audit expenditures made as of that 
date and just published. 

A dispatch to the Chicago Tribune 
from Fort Wayne. I ml., says the- first 
snowstorm of the season occurred 
there on September 10. The flurries 
lasti d fi ir ii\ e or ten minutes. 

Kansas politician-, are strongly of 
the opinion that Governor Hoch will 
call a special session of tin- Legisla- 
ture if the railroads persist in their de- 
termination to ignore the Two-Cent 
hare order. 

Director North of the Census Bu- 
reau has been advised that the final 
figure- for the new State of Oklahoma 
>how a total population of 1,414,(142. 
Oklahoma has 721,141 inhabitants and 
Indian Territory 692,901. 

It is reported that President 
Roosevelt is considering the advisa- 
bility of the creation of a new Cabi- 
net portfolio to handle transportation 
matters now devolving on the Inter 
state Commerce Commission. 

The Coroner's jury at Quebec, on 
September 12, rendered a verdict that 
it could not state the real cause of 
the fall of the Quebec bridge, Inn de- 
clared that, according to the evidence 
adduced, all necessary precautions 
were taken. 

A $100,000 shortage has been discov- 
ered in the accounts of the State Tax 
Commissioner of Xew Orleans, La., 
and the police are searching for 
Charles E. Letten, chief clerk in the 
Tax Collector's office, who is charged 
with the defalcation. 

At a special meeting of the Chicago 
City Council on September 12 it was 
decided by a vote of 46 to 4 to allow 
the Chicago Railways Company an 
extension of 140 days in which to ac- 
cept its street-railway ordinance 
passsed several months ago. 

Lucy Page Caster, of Chica 
ident of the National Auti Cigarette- 
League, has gone to Xew York to 
organize a local branch of the League 
and the first move in her campaign 
will he to call on L. II. llarriin.in 
in an attempt to induce him to sup- 
press smoking in his hoys' club. 

Representative J. W. Weeks, of 
Massachusetts, says that he favors 
any plan to get rid of the Philip- 
pines, but lie also believes in having 
a big enough navy to whip those 
countries which, for commercial rea- 
sons or territorial position, we would 
be compelled to fight, lie mentions 
Germany and Japan, he says, because 
we are likely to have trouble with 
those countries. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



Andersson, -.1239 

Anlons.n. .M.oiii.s 

Anderson, -988 
Anderson, -897 
Anelsson, (Carl B. 
Anderson, Charles 
Anderson 
Andersen 



Kamp, i:. H. 
Kidman. G. H. 
Registered letter) 

K list. us. n. I '. l.i 

Kennedy, J. 

Kishl, Mans 
v. -1240 Karlson, Gustai 
-1305 Kt-rmagoret, Anatel 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS, 

WIEDWALO BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Anderson, Albln k. ek, Albert 
Anderson, -1118 Lindow, E. 

AndersBon, Patrick I.ukkima, Mr. 

Brusbard, 1402 Kind, Gus A. 

Behrens, !•'. 1. niter, Franz 

Bortrom. Win. LJndholm, Nestor 

Bade, Alex. Luckman, Thorwald 

Benson, Kay l.arsen, Alf. 

Bouton, Eugene Larsen, P. -1179 

Blom, t'li. a. -11G6 Larsen, Eivin.i 

Bedford, Arthur I.ouis. Coadon 

Bundesen, Jens l.oun.ke. A. -1321 
Brander, W. -1389Lewls, John 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
st..ck. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Lg, John k 
1 lolln 
Bergersen, Alt'. 

i. John io. 
Bjorkholm, ti. a. 
1 lergstrom, Fran,: 
Blom, Flllp 
l ti uss.-i. K.iward 
Brlngager, A. ir. 
Bergh, i:..rge 
Carlson, <;. a. 
Carlson, C. E. 



jarsen, Axel 
Llndholm, C. 
Norentzen, Hilmer 
Lundstedt, C. 
l iindroos, Askar A. 
I.aine, Frank 
Le Goff, Sylvian 
Maaek. Hans 
Markman, H. 
.Martinson. August 
Martin. John B, 
903Malmherg. Robetl 



Christiansen, l.u.lvigMiller, James 



M 



B RO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established sine.- 1S86, and continually serving the sea' 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you arc buying a FUR HAT, cither 
soft or stiff, sec to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed ill it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 
I >ea l.-rs in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



BUY A LOT IN SAN PEDRO 

It will make you rich some day. 
Call on 

PECK & ANDERSON, 

Next door to the Postoffice. 

SAN PEDRO, CAT.. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Healer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN' PEDRO, CAL. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAI.. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street. 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



FRED SVENDSEN 



UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAI,. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, -906 Absolonsen, Ole M. 

Andersson, A. H. Andersen, Gustaf 
Askerlund, Daniel O. Aaquist, Thorvald 
Anderson, S. Arnesen, Karl A. 

Andersson, Adolf Albertsen, Johannes 
Ardelean, J. Andersen, P. -858 



Chrlstensen, M 
t'olirl, Herman 
Collberg, ('has. 
Christofferoen, A. 
Cocclne, Louis 
Christiansen 
Cooley, .). ii. l'.. 
Cone, Pierre 
Caraaghan, Wm. 
Cook, Harry 
Carlson, Aksel 



Mahrlng W. 
McDonald, N. 
Maibohm, Hans 
Munroe, H. G. 
McLeod 

Mikkelsen, B. -l I4S 
Mannitrom. \V. 
Mattson. J . 
Miller, James 
Magel, Fred 
Mahnqvist, J. 



Chrlstensen, Christ Martyn. Leroy 
Carlson. Wal.lemar Mi^mussen, Carl E. 
Chamberlln, L. C. Mikkelsen, Peter 
Chrlstensen, Ludwig Monterus, John 
Danielsen, Hans H. Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Damdani, Alesandro Nass, Paddy 
Dittmer, Otto ..ilson. Daiiiel 

I lanlelson, Gust.iv Nilson, -737 



1 mnwoodle, H. 
Dahllierg, J. 

on, Edward 
Ekeland, Sigurd 
rs, John 

agen, 1'. F. 
Ericson, .lohan 
Folvig, J. A. 



Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Nilsen, N. A. -7:!4 
Neilsen, George 
Nilsen, Peter 
Neerheim, Th. P. 
Nordin, M. 
Neilsen, W. 
Nystrom, Ragnar 



t'lledrlkson, Andrew Osterhais, R. 
Porstrom, Oskar Olsen, Guttorn 

Kernl.eig, (lustaf Olsen, N. 

' I is. ai Olsen, Olaf 

Gustafson, < iskar Olson, W. -668 
Goethehcur, Ch. Olsen, A. -759 

Gallen, Paul Oysteth, S. 

Gundersen, Andreas Osterhuis. .1. 
Gallen, R. Paulsen, -606 

Guerin, Le Port 
Gunmanreu,, John 
Goff, Steve 
Griel, Bernhardt 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Georges, Angela 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Ilelman, J. G. 



Petterson, Axel 
Petersen, Charley 
Paris, Walter 
Petersen, C. -721 
Pedersen. L. -1821 
Pettersen, K. E. -903 
Pedersen, -896 
Pettersen, 1943 



(Registered l-tt.-i i Pedersen, Alf 
Haalemitter, Karl Penney. Mathem 



II sldal, Karl G 
Hennlng, Gustav 
Hansen, Harry 
Haker, Matt 
Hansen, Chas. E 
Holltl, John W. 



Persson, J. L. -921 
I etersen, E. -101 
Person, A. -1192 
Polge, L. 
Perleny, Emil 
1'orter, Chas. 



Holman, George M. Pledvache. Emlle 
Heesche, Helnrlch Pederson, John 
Haldorsen, Herman Perkins. D. H. 
Ilohman, H. Pedersen, Jack 

Hansen. -1073 Rauen, W. 

llenriksen, Hans Runge, Heiilch 
Hansen, Hjalmar Reulund. Andrew 
llohnian, Carl -1767 Rheinhard. Wilhelm 
Hansen, Christian Rush, Fred 
Hansen, F. Richardson, H. E. 

(Registered letter) Rvtha, M. O. 
Hansen, -U54 (Reg. letter P. O.) 

Helms, W. Runge. H. 

i Registered letter) Reay, Stephen A. 
Henrides, G. Rasmussen, R. 

11 nison, J. A. nice, Patric B. 

Hansen, L. Reynolds, Thomas 

Holmstrom, CharlesR as h, H. 
Ilahorsen. -595 Renoids, August 

Herman, Fred Smith, Aksel F. 

Hillsen, Halvor Schaffler, A. 

Ileti.lriksen. G. H. (Reg. letter P. O.) 



Hansen. Chr. F. 
Hudson, Mat 
Iversen, John 
(Package) 



Scarborda, Mario 
Smith. Axel 
Sorensen, -1664 
Singer, J. 



Johannesen, Hans H.s amue lsen, Otto 
Johansen, Albert Soto Pedro 
Johansen, F. W. Sode'rstrom, O. 
Johansen, C. M. -1593 San ders, Charles 
Jungjohan, John Stahn M. 



Johansson, Nils 
Jensen, P. -695 
Johansson, -1576 
Jensen, -734 
Johansen, G. 
Junker, Paul 
Johnson, John 



Sorensen, Michael 
Svensson, Ture 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Scheel, Johannes 
Schmidt, F. 
Steen, Hans 
Schannon, H. C. 



Johannesen, A. -l. r .57 gverkesen, L. C. 
Johansen. A. F. -1287s c hulz, Chris 

" -1670 



Schmidt, E. 
Selzer, M. 
Samrio, S. 
Svedstrup, E. 
Sverkesen, Lou 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Slrandqvlst, Louis 



ensen, H. -1311 
Johansen. Theodor 
Johnsea, -1281 
Jensen, Chris 
Juhnke, William 
Johansen, 1364 
Johnsen, J. -1050 
Jenssen, J .Krlsten gchatjse, Otto 
.Inhanssen, Aug. F. Svendren, -1050 
Jensen, -734 stafr _ Ij0ulg 

Jolinsen, Alf. Skugstad. Christian 

Johansson, Hjalmar salberg Oskar 
Jorgensen, Walter Tvrholm, Johan 
Johansson, N. Aug. Thompson, Stephen 
johansen, -MM Tobiason, Johan 

Johnson, Gust. Tingleman, E. 

.laansen, Hans Tillman, Andrew 

Jensen. Peter T ipp, Joseph 

Johansson. -1486 



Torgersen, R. 
TMko. E. 

Hnderhill. Geo. A. 
Voreland. G. K. 
Williams, R. E. 



Johansson. 11. 

Jensen, -1412 
Johansen. 1287 
Jensen, P. 

( Registered letter) Weiss, Charles 

Jansson, K. G. Wahlers. \V. 

Johansen. Carl Wordehoff, Alfred 

Johanson, -1452 Westin, J. A. 

Johansson, A. -1557 wilson, J. 

Klingstrom, G. Washburn, Thomas 

Kirstein John Widos. Stefan 

Kruse. Ed. Winseus, Petal 

Klinthorn. Martin Yetwel, Fred 
Karsberg, C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The British bark Mozambique, seventy days 
overdue from Newcastle-on-Tyne for Tacoma, 
passed in by Tatoosh Island on September 17. 

The American ship John Currier, which was 
reported ashore at Nelson's Lagoon, Alaska, 
has become a total wreck and the 30,000 cases of 
salmon which she had on board have been lost. 

E. W. Newhall has filed a libel against the 
British ship Wray Castle for $718 at San Fran- 
cisco. It is alleged that a cargo brought to San 
Francisco by the vessel was damaged owing to 
improper handling and seamanship. 

The new steel steamer St. Helens, built by 
Harlan & Hollingsworth, of Wilmington, Del., 
for the Pacific Coast lumber trade, sailed from 
Philadelphia, Pa., on September 12 for San Fran- 
cisco, after taking on 5000 tons of coal for Pa- 
cific Coast parties. 

Captain Nopander has taken command of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company's freighter Me- 
teor, running between Seattle and San Francisco, 
Captain Wright, former commander of the 
steamer under the Globe Navigation Company, 
having resigned. 

The overdue British ship Leicester Castle, 
whose passage from Salina Cruz to Adelaide, 
Soutn Australia, has been so protracted that she 
was quoted for reinsurance at 10 per cent, has 
arrived at her destination. The passage of the 
Leicester Castle occupied 164 days. 

The overdue British bark Mozambique, which 
occupied 196 days on the passage from Newcastle, 
England, to Portland, Ore., has arrived at the 
latter port. The Mozambique for some time has 
figured in the overdue list, and was quoted at a 
premium of 8 per cent for reinsurance. 

The American ship William P. Frye arrived 
at San Francisco on September 18, 139 days from 
Baltimore, and reported a very rough passage 
while rounding the Horn. The Frye also had 
a narrow escape from collision with an unknown 
ship at night in a gale off Cape Horn. 

The Spreckels tug Dauntless returned to San 
Francisco on September 20 from San Diego, after 
having towed the largest log raft ever built from 
Astoria to San Diego. The raft contained 11,- 
000,000 feet of lumber. The Dauntless has made 
three similar tows within the last few months 
without mishap. 

The Alaska Pacific Steamship Company's 
steamers Watson and Buckman are to be 
equipped with wireless telegraph apparatus with- 
in the next thirty days. H. F. Alexander, Presi- 
dent of the company, is in San Francisco arrang- 
ing for the work and for other improvements to 
both steamers. 

The wireless station at Point Loma, Cal., was 
in communication on September 16 with the 
United States cruiser Milwaukee, which passed 
the harbor 200 miles out at sea on her way from 
Panama to San Francisco. At the former place 
the cruiser Alabama relieved the Milwaukee just 
before the latter left for the North. 

The new steam-schooner Sybil Marston, re- 
cently built at Boole's Ways, Oakland, went on 
her trial trip around San Francisco Bay on Sep- 
tember 14. The Marston will be under the man- 
agement of Escher, Minor & Co., who, with W. A. 
Boole, own a controlling interest in the craft. 
She has the distinction of being the largest steam- 
schooner built at Boole's. 

The following changes of shipmasters were an- 
nounced at San Francisco on September 16: Cap- 
tain George E. Bridgett, steamer Asuncion, vice 
Captain John McKellar; Captain A. Donaldson, 
steamer Carmel, vice Captain T. H. Corning; 
Captain R. Dickson, steamer Lansing, vice Cap- 
tain R. Salvcson; Captain J. H. Cunningham, 
steamer Leader, vice Captain B. J. Benson. 

The following changes of shipmasters were an- 
nounced at San Francisco on September 19: 
Steamer Del Norte, Captain J. A. Sanford, vice 
A. H. Sears; steamer Phoenix, Captain John P. 
Fagcrstrom, vice Captain Henry G. Hansen; 
steamer Sea Foam, Captain H. G. Hansen, vice 
Captain F. Millet; steamer Acme, Captain F. Mil- 
ler, vice Captain J. G. Halvig. 

Puget Sound snipping men say that the new 
siren placed by the Government at Tatoosh, 
Wash., is practically useless and the aids to 
navigation thus far provided have added nothing 
to the safety of the entrance to the Straits. Up- 
on this showing shipping men will renew their 
fight for a lightship to be anchored on Swift- 
sure Bank, directly in front of the entrance to 
the Straits. 

The Russo-Chinesc Company, which maintains 
a line of steamships between Odessa and Vladi- 
vostok via India, will in the near future inaugu- 
rate a line between San Francisco and Niko- 
laicvsk, which will be made the connecting link 
between the Transsiberian and Amur Railway 
and the United States roads. Orders for new 
vessels have been given and some already are 
under construction. 

Word has reached the Department of Tustice 
that money has been procured from Japan to 
pay the fines imposed on the master and mem- 
bers of the crew of the Japanese schooner Nippo, 
who were convicted of sealing within the three- 
mile limit and fined from $200 to $500 each. The 
men will be discharged. This will leave three 



members of the crew of the Japanese schooner 
Kaiwo similarly fined. 

The subscription for the purchase of a gold 
service for the United States cruiser California 
has been started with a check for $500 from a 
prominent Californian. The committee which 
is collecting funds for the service for the war- 
ship has decided to present the California with 
a golden service instead of, silver, because of the 
fact that California has always been known to 
the world as the Golden State. 

Officers of the Department of Commerce and 
Labor made inspections of the various gasoline 
launches on San Francisco Bay on September 18. 
In several cases it was found that adequate life- 
saving appliances were not provided. It is the 
intention of the officers of the Department to 
insist upon adequate provision being made for 
the safety of those using the launches, and to 
this end the regulations will be strictly enforced. 

In a suit before Judge Seawell, of San Fran- 
cisco, a judgment was entered on Seotember 18 
for $90,732.40 against the Barneson-Hibberd Com- 
pany of that city, 'this judgment was rendered 
in favor of Gregory B. Drisen and H. /.ucker- 
man, residents of Vladivostok, Siberia. The suit 
was brought to obtain damages suffered by the 
Russians for the failure of local people to de- 
liver a cargo of goods purchased at a cost of 
more than $172,000, upon which they had paid 
the sum of $30,000. 

Captain Christensen, of the barkentine Irmgard, 
reports that on his last passage to Honolulu, 
T. H., when three days out, he encountered a 
strong current from the south, which increased 
in strength right up to Oahu and was so strong 
as to carry him thirty-three miles to the north- 
ward out of his course in one day. He believes 
it is the same current the Manchuria encountered 
a year ago, which carried her on the Walmanalo 
reef. This would indicate that the current is a 
periodical one with annual periods. 

The Federal Government is going after the 
owners of motor-boats who disregard the navi- 
gation laws relative to lights, life-preservers and 
other details. Supervising Inspector Berming- 
ham, of San Francisco, on September 18 received 
the following letter from the Inspector-General 
at Washington: "Furnish this office as soon as 
possible the name and tonnage of each motor 
vessel carrying passengers for hire operating in 
all your local districts, names of persons in 
charge, whether they are properly licensed, and 
if the law regarding lights, whistles, boats and 
life-preservers is being fully observed. Furnish 
Collectors of Customs for the several districts 
involved with a copy of your report to this of- 
fice." 

The new steamer Olsen & Mahoney, recently 
built at Wilmington, De'., for Olsen & Mahoney 
of San Francisco, has just started on her long voy- 
age from Baltimore to San Francisco by way of 
Magellan Straits with a cargo of 2000 tons of coal. 
The Olsen & Mahoney is built of steel. She is 
224 feet long, forty-one feet beam and twenty 
feet in depth. She is fitted with triple expansion 
engines and Scotch boilers. In addition to her 
other equipment, she has the very latest towing 
machinery. The Olsen & Mahoney is of 1497 
tons gross and 779 tons net measurement. She 
has a carrying capacity of one million and a half 
feet of lumber. Captain H. T. Payne, late of the 
steam-schooner Del Norte, is in command of the 
new craft. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on September 20: Ship Guiana, 
186 days from Mobile for Bahia Blanca, 90 per 
cent; ship Cressington, 175 days from Iquique for 
Falmouth, 6 per cent; Celtic Chief, 155 davs from 
Hamburg for Honolulu. 8 per cent; La Tour 
d'Auvergne, 111 days from Rochester for San 
Francisco, 8 per cent; Rochambcau, 165 days from 
Rochester for San Francisco, 8 oer cent; Medea, 
202 days from Stettin for San Francisco, 26 per 
cent; Jessomene, 162 days from Wallaroo for 
Falmouth, 11 per cent; Raiorc, 132 davs from 
London for San Francisco, 6 per cent; Simla, 150 
days from Port Pirie for Falmouth. 21 ner cent; 
Tnverlyon, 134 days from Wallaroo for Falmouth, 
6 per cent; Haddon Hall, 140 davs from Geelong 
for Falmouth, 6 per cent; Craigisla, 106 days from 
Newcastle. Australia, for Mollendo, 10 per cent; 
Kenilworth. at Rio Janeiro for San Francisco, 11 
per cent; Silberhorn, 100 days from Newcastle, 
Australia, for Pisagua, 10 per cent: Louisa, 103 
days from Bremen for San Francisco, 11 per 
cent. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards. 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St.. 
near Montgomery. Phone Temporary 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y.. 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO. O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMI 
JOURNAL 



NTS 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



\V. MACARTHUR, Editor | P. SCHARRBNBBRG, Mffr. 



Sl.no 



TERMS IX ADVANCE 
One year, by mall, - $2. no | Six months, - - 
Advert Ising Elates on Applies I 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Sal 

noon a i .k 

Tii insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress :iii communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

,-.! ;,i the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

dquarters of the Sailors' Union of the P 
14-46 East street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
...l in the .H iTJRNA I. provided thej 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side onlj 
of tip. paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is nol responsible for 
Hi.- expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
■ >f manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1907. 



A LEGAL-AIDER AT SEA. 



The Legal Aid Society, of New York City, 
is a body formed for the ostensible purpose of 
aiding seamen to secure redress in the courts. 
One would naturally suppose that the rela- 
tions existing between such a body and the 
seamen's unions would be at least friendly, if 
not actually confidential. Such is not the Fact, 
however, if we may judge by the sentiments 
expressed by the Legal Aid Society itself. 
through one of its assumed spokesmen. The 
gentleman in question, a Mr. Von Briesen. 
who signs himself President of the Legal Aid 
Society, has written a letter to a correspon- 
dent in Portland, Or., from which we cull the 
following : 

We understand that a so-called "sailor's union" 
stands for corruption along the west shore of 
our country, and we know it has fought us 
tooth and nail in the matter of getting these laws 
passed. Now that they are passed we hope that 
through yuir assistance and that of such emi- 
nent gentlemen as Circuit Judge Gilbert and 
State Court Judges Sears and Ganteubein much 
good may come to the sailors and shipping in 
Portland. Here in New York, while the "crimps" 
al their best, the regular tax for stealing a 
sailor from an incoming ship and selling him to 
an outgoing ship was $20 per head. By this ta» 
rascals derived an income of $5.000. mm a 
year on 250,000 sailors wliom they annually dis 
posed of, and this tax naturally came upon the 
commerce of the country burdening it. I under- 
stand that in Portland the head tax levied bv 
these "crimps" is $300. 

Here we have a more or less direct charge 
of corruption against the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific. Tt would be interesting to learn 
whence Mr. Von Briesen derives his "under- 
standing" on the subject. Taking into con- 
sideration the entire production of the gentle- 
man, it would be interesting to learn whence 
the gentleman derives his authority to speak 
on the subject at all. Certainly that author- 
ity does not rest in any knowledge of the sub- 
ject. Mr. Von Briesen's allusion to certain 
laws passed at the instance of the Legal Aid 
Society, and which the "so-called sailors' 
union" is charged with having fought "tooth 
and nail," presumably refers to the so-called 
Anti-Shanghaiing bill enacted by the last Con- 
gress. It need simply be said that the atti- 
tude of the organized seamen toward that 
measure was one, not of opposition but of 
helpfulness. The seamen merely insisted that 



the bill should be so framed as to effect its 
avowed purpose of restraining the crimps, 
without at the same time injuring the seamen 
themselves. That's all. If the Legal Aid So- 
ciety can find in the seamen's attitude anything 
conflicting with its own objects, it is entitled 
to make the most of it. It is the common ex- 
perience of the seamen that the legislation pro- 
posed for the seamen's benefit by bodies claim- 
ing particular concern for their welfare is just 
as likely to be injurious as beneficial. This 
fact occasionally brings the seamen into un- 
pleasant contact with their "friends," hence 
the charges of "corruption" made by the lat- 
ter. Apparently the seamen, if they would re- 
tain the good opinion of their self-styled bene- 
factors, must be willing to shut their eyes and 
open their mouths whenever any legislation is 
proposed in their behalf. It might as well be 
understood that the seamen decline to longer 
act the baby, content to take their chances of 
getting a dose of medicine or a bit of candy 
at the hands of their guardians. This atti- 
tude on the part of the seamen is justified not 
only by common sense, but by long experience. 
It is notorious that much, if not most, of the 
unjust legislation affecting seamen has been 
passed under the assumption — honest enough, 
so far as many of the men responsible for it 
are concerned — that it was designed for the 
seamen!s benefit. The Legal Aid Society and 
all other societies must reconcile themselves to 
the certainty of opposition by the seamen to 
all measures that are not beneficial in fact as 
well as in name. If that be corruption, make 
the most of it ! 

The charge made by the Legal Aid Society, 
through its President, that the "so-called sail- 
ors' union stands for corruption" is very well 
answered in the following, from the Portland 
(Or A Labor Press: 

Upon what grounds ch.es the President of the 
New York Legal Aid Society — Mr. Von Briesen 
— found his conclusions that the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific is supposed to stand for corrup- 
tion on this Coast? 

There is a story in one of the Portland dailies 
to the effect that Mr. McCann. a lawyer prac- 
ticing his profession in this city, has conceived 
the idea of organizing a Legal Aid Society in 
Portland, and in seeking information pertaining 
to the plan of organization, he wrote the Presi- 
dent of the New York Society of the same char- 
acter and received in answer much data relative 
to the crimping system carried on in many sea- 
ports in this country and especially in Portland. 

As an item of information, Mr. Von Briesen 
volunteers the statement: "We understand a so- 
called sailors' union stands fur corruption along 
the west shore of our country." 

While the accusation is not direct, it is of such 
a character as to justify our challenging the au- 
thor to make good his hint that the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific stands for corruption. 

We are satisfied that the insinuation is too 
mean, scurrilous and unwarranted to be for a 
moment entertained as truth by any reasonably 
intelligent man or woman, yet we would like to 
have Mr. Von Briesen give some basis for his 
false insinuation against the character of honest, 
upright citizens of the Pacific Coast. 

The Sailors' Union of the Pacific is managed 
by reputable men of more than ordinary ability. 
and any insinuations to the contrary must be 
viewed as the result of either malice or ignorance. 

Tn passing it may be pointed out that the 
statement of Mr. Von Briesen, that the crimps' 
charges fall upon the commerce of the coun- 
try, burdening it, is contrary to the known 
facts. The facts, in brief, are that the "ship- 
ping-fees," "blood money" and other species 
of extortion practiced by the crimps fall upon 
the seamen ; further, that the "commerce of 
the country," i. e., the shipowners of all na- 
tions, too often, indeed generally, connive at 
the robbery. It may be taken for granted 
that as soon as the "commerce of the coun- 
try" makes up its mind to dispense with the 
services of the crimps, that class will have to 
"git" in quick order. The Legal Aid Society 
is barking up the wrong tree. 



BEE DF.MANDS EXCLUSION. 



The Sacramento Bee, as usual, hits off 
the situation in its remarks upon certain 
foreign press comment upon the recent af- 
fair up North. Referring to the statement 
of the London Times, that the "riots" were 
inspired by dislike of the Asiatic "on account 
of his thrift and industry, quite as much as 
on account of the low wages for which he 
works," the Bee says : 

Rut suppose that is true. Thrift and industry, 
joined to willingness to work for low wages, and 
a very low standard of living, are just what make 
it impossible for American labor to compete witli 
Asiatics without a descent to the Asiatic scale of 
living. 

This is the nub of the whole matter. If the 
Chinese, Japanese and Hindus had neither thrift 
nor industry, their competition would not con- 
cern American labor nor tend to reduce wages to 
a rice basis. 

There are numerous reasons why coolie labor 
is not desirable in this country, but its cheapness 
is the most important, and it is sufficient. If there 
were hut a few Orientals, even this would not 
much matter, but there are hundreds of millions 
living chise to starvation, and if they were freely 
admitted and welcomed the United States and 
Canada would in a short period be overrun bv 
them. Before many years half the population of 
California might be -made up of Chinese. Japa- 
nese and Hindus This result was threatened in 
the case of the Chinese alone, until restriction of 
immigration was secured, and later a stringent 
F.xclusion law. which remains in force. 

Unless diplomatic or other means be found for 
excluding Japanese labor, this country must 
sooner or later be under the necessity of passing 
some sort of Exclusion Act, which the approach- 
ing expiration of the existing treaty with Japan 
will leave Congress free to do, 

We would simply add that, in our opin- 
ion, the time has already arrived for the pas- 
sage of an Exclusion Act. Diplomacy has 
already failed, and failed miserably. Indeed, 
it would appear that the more diplomacy the 
more trouble. Let us have a settlement of 
the question by the only means available, 
namely, by the passage of an All-Asiatic Ex- 
clusion Act. 



Several of the British self-governing colonies 
in Australasia have determined to keep out all 
forms of Asiatic cheap labor, and the problem 
thus created for the Imperial authorities is 
one for which the solution is yet to be found. 
The relations of the British Government and 
Japan, for instance, are inconsistent, to say the 
least, with the attitude of the Governments of 
New Zealand and Australia on the alien labor 
question, and more than one far-seeing states- 
man has predicted that the time will come when 
the English will regret the relations established 
by the alliance with Japan. Without discussing 
the rights or wrongs of the anti-foreign agita- 
tion which brought on the Vancouver outrage, 
or the economic wisdom of a policy that rejects 
needed labor, it may be remarked that the inci- 
dents of the last few days should promote a 
closer sympathy and a better understanding be 
tween London and Washington, and simplify the 
adjustment of the Hindu matter at Bellingham. 

The foregoing, from the Philadelphia Pub- 
lic Ledger, is illustrative of the trend of 
thought created by the recent "riots" at Bel- 
lingham and Vancouver. It is natural, and 
in fact inevitable, that these incidents should 
"promote a closer sympathy and create a bit- 
ter understanding" between the authorities at 
London and Washington. In other words. 
the "riots" have demonstrated that the inter- 
ests of the people of the Pacific Coast — the 
people at home — must be considered in any 
programme of foreign policy, and that when- 
ever the latter conflicts with the former, the 
latter is bound to receive much the worse of 
the encounter. 



Good morning, John Bull! Have you used 
Pears' soft soap on your ally? Or are you 
going to get down on your marrow-bones and 
apologize to the Japanese honorable govern- 
ment ? 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Wellington (New Zealand), September 3. — The 
Court of Appeals has finally declared the strike 
of slaughter-house men and their sympathizers il- 
legal. The workmen participating in it, the court 
holds, are violating the award of the Court of 
Arbitration and may be fined, and, in case of non- 
payment, may be imprisoned for a term not ex- 
ceeding one year. — Press Dispatch. 

Here we have compulsory arbitration in 
its ultimate form. Later advices inform us 
that the Labor Department paid the men's 
fines in order to save them from going to 
prison. This, of course, was very good of 
the Department, but it suggests the possi- 
bility that self-preservation may have dic- 
tated the policy of paying the fines — self- 
preservation of the Department, we mean. 
A term of actual imprisonment for viola- 
tion of an award would probably prove the 
"last straw" in the case of compulsory arbi- 
tration, a case that is none too good as 
things now stand. 



Referring to the troubles at Vancouver, 

B. C, the London Times says : 

The rights of all men who visit British soil, 
whatever color or race, must be unflinchingly up- 
held by the whole authority of the local Govern- 
ment and the Imperial Crown. 

Sounds big, doesn't it, especially the part 
about the "Imperial Crown." However, the 
Times knows well enough that in practice 
the Imperial Crown is merely the "British 
Public." The Times knows, too, that in a 
show-down the British Public will stand by 
its own kith and kin "across seas," as 
against any race on earth, and more especial- 
ly against any Asiatic race. Needless to say, 
the Times also knows the kind of talk to 
pass out to the Japs for the purpose of satis- 
fying their "honor." 



The Commercial Telegraphers of the coun- 
try, who have now been on strike for several 
weeks, report good prospects of a satisfactory 
ending, sooner or later. In view of the mag- 
nitude of the forces against which the Teleg- 
raphers are contending, a prompt and gen- 
erous response should be made to their appeal 
for financial assistance. The purpose of the 
Western Union and Postal Telegraph com- 
panies is clear, namely, to destroy all possi- 
bility of organization among their employes. 
It is a cruel and barbarous struggle between 
the forces of monopoly on the one hand and 
the forces of human progress on the other. 
It is a safe prediction that the latter will win 
in the long run. Help shorten the run ! 



President Holland, of the National Letter- 
Carriers' Association, announced to the re- 
cent convention of that body that he would 
not be a candidate for re-election, on account 
of the attitude assumed toward him by the 
Postoffice Department. In other words, Pres- 
ident Holland has been notified by the Depart- 
ment that he must either quit his "pernicious 
activity" in trying to secure legislation for the 
Letter-Carriers, or quit his job. President 
Holland has chosen the former horn of the 
dilemma. Thus Government by Executive 
Order scores another point. The Letter-Car- 
riers must be taught to make their appeals to 
the proper authority, namely, to the authority 
they are appealing against! 



Do your shopping early and give the Retail 
Clerks an opportunity to enjoy a fair measure 
of home life. 



For union-label products consult the Jour- 
nal's ad columns. 



OUR "COMING OF AGE." 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



The first issues of the Journal were received 
with mixed feelings. The seamen were proud 
and enthusiastic; the seamen's friends were 
amused and skeptical; the seamen's enemies were 
openly contemptuous. These feelings were jus- 
tified by the respective viewpoints of those who 
entertained them. To the seamen the Journal 
was a new weapon that added to their power and 
dignity among their fellows in other callings. To 
the seamen's friends the Journal appeared as a 
novel experiment, a species of plaything that 
might possibly instruct while it amused its pro- 
jectors, a thing to be toyed with, broken, and cast 
aside. The views of the seamen's enemies were 
more pronounced. These classes had so long 
been accustomed to regard *he seaman as utterly 
helpless that they looked upon his venture in 
journalism as not only an absurdity, but as a 
species of treason to his erstwhile masters. The 
crimps and others who flourished by preying 
upon the seaman looked upon the Journal as a 
hopeless enterprise, doomed to speedy failure. 

The Journal's readers, among whom are many 
who joined the list of subscribers with the first 
issue, may bear witness to the soundness or oth- 
erwise of the views entertained toward the paper 
at the outset of its career. The Journal has 
now been issued regularly for twenty years, and 
with a constantly increasing support, both moral 
and financial. Throughout *hat period the Jour- 
nal has participated actively in the public affairs 
of the country and of the world. Giving its at- 
tention primarily and mainly to the affairs of the 
seamen, it has voiced the wishes and enforced the 
demands of that craft in the homes of the peo- 
ple and in the halls of legislation. It is freely 
admitted by those most competent to speak that 
a goodly share of the credit for the achievements 
of the organized seamen in improved laws and 
better economic conditions is due to the educa- 
tional work carried on by this paper. In turn, it 
remains to be said that the Journal's success in 
this connection is due to the system of manage- 
ment established at its birth. The men who have 
been successively entrusted with the conduct of 
the paper may have lacked in the literary knack, 
hut they possessed a virtue that more than com- 
pensated for any failing in that regard; they 
spoke out of an abundance of experience of the 
subject with which they dealt and out of hearts 
entirely devoted to the cause in which they were 
enlisted, not as soldiers of fortune but as patriots. 

In keeping with the original design, the Jour- 
nal has devoted much space to the interests of 
the labor movement at large. As the official organ 
of the seafaring craft, the Journal lias always 
striven to attain that highest ideal of unionism, 
namely, the advancement of particular craft in- 
terests by aiding in the advancement of all other 
craft interests. At all times the Journal has 
sought to avoid the advancement of the seamen's 
cause at the erpense of any other class or of 
the public. Whatever the seamen have gained, 
either through the Journal or through their or- 
ganization, has been net gain; that is, it has been 
gain to all legitimate interests, not merely a 
transfer of advantage from one hand or party to 
another. 

It does not lie with the Journal to estimate how 
much of success or failure it has achieved in 
these twenty years. It can say, however, that it 
has conscientiously sought to' deserve success, 
and that by the only means that make success 
worth seeking or gaining. The Journal has en- 
deavored in all cases to find the truth of a given 
question, and having found it, to speak the truth; 
it has endeavored to keep its pages clean and 
presentable, both as to matter and make-up, to 
make them readable without descending to catch- 
penny; it has sought to be fair to all parties, to 
shipowners, legislators, statesmen and politicians, 
no less than to the seamen; it has sought, while 
demanding justice for the seamen and the work- 
ers in all other crafts, to grant justice to all other 
parties and interests. In short, the Journal has 
sought to rise to the best conception of a free 
and enlightened press, the ever-tireless and all- 
conquering champion of right and the deadly foe 
of wrong. If to seek these things be to succeed, 
the Journal may reasonably claim success. 

With its "coming of age" the Journal renews 
its pledge to the principles upon which it was 
founded and thanks its friends — readers, contrib- 
utors and advertisers — for the consideration 
which they have shown in the past, coupled with 
the hope that their numbers will increase and 
multiply. To that end the Journal will do its 
share, always endeavoring to carry its years, not 
only with the dignity of age but also with the 
confidence of youth, to grow younger in hope 
fulness as the period of realization draws nearer 
and nearer. 



Demand the union label on all products ! 



Whether or not the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company shall put on a direct line of steamers 
between San Francisco and Alaskan ports will 
in a measure be decided at a mass meeting to 
be held at the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. A call has been issued to shipping 
men, merchants and others interested to be pres- 
ent at that time and participate in the discus- 
sions following the announcement that the 
steamship company has submitted definite pro- 
posals to undertake the establishment of a regu- 
lar service if enough support be forthcoming. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 23, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. A donation of $100 was 
made to the Commercial Telegraphers on strike. 
Chas. A. M. Bock, No. 985, was expelled from 
the Union. 

NOTICE: Nominations for delegates to the 
convention of the International Seamen's Union 
of America will be made at the regular meetings 
held at Headquarters and Branches on Septem- 
ber 30. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
Shipping rather dull; prospects uncertain. 

II. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; snipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain; few members ashore. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping good. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency. Sept. 15, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain; men scarce. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 9, 1907. 
Shipping improving. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 19, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping good. Resolution to purchase 
cemetery plot from the Mount Olivet Cemetery 
Association for the sum of $2500 was carried. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 12, 1907. 
Shipping medium; sailing vessels slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 12, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping good. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, 111., Sept. 16, 1907. 
Situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER, Sec'y pro tern. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y.. Sept. 7, 1907. 
Shipping good. 

R. H. WALKER, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

DANIEL SULLIVAN, Secretary. 
15 Union St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Sept. 10, 1907. 
Situation fair. 

H. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 



O (AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



1 




ON THE GREAT LAKES 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




*^^* 



GROWTH OF LAKE SHIPS. 



During a conversation a few days ago 
between Alfred Noble, the noted civil en- 
gineer, ami a Detroit friend, the matter of 
the development of tonnage on the Lakes 
was discussed. The average tonnage ol 
boats in commission on Lake Superior when 
tlie Weitzel lock was opened to navigation 
in 1881 was emphasized. The Detroit Free 
Press says: Afterward Mr. Noble prepared 
a list of the largest vessels built on the 
Lakes each year fr.un 1876 to 1881, not in- 
cluding those lost during that period. The 
list follows : 

Net 

Boat. Built. Class R'g'ter. 

\\ issahickon 1876 Steamer 1,423 

Marion \Y. Page... 1876 Schooner 749 

Avon 1877 Steamer 1,538 

Charles Foster 1877 Schooner 997 

Auburn 1878 Steamer 1,662 

I )elaware 187S Steamer 1,526 

Conestoga 1878 Steamer 1,562 

Juniata 1878 Steamer 1,47-1 

Xew York 187'' Steamer 1.751 

Rome 187') Steamer 1,721 

Yoiikers 187') Steamer 1,571 

John X. Glidden...l879 Steamer 1,110 

Rochester 1880 Steamer 2,046 

Boston 1880 Steamer 1,669 

Lehigh 1880 Steamer 1,503 

Conemaugh 1880 Steamer 1.453 

Lycoming 1880 Steamer 1.423 

Progress 1880 Steamer 1,309 

Hiawatha 1880 Steamer 1,159 

City of Rome 1881 Steamer 1,594 

Tacoma 1881 Steamer 1,609 

Clarion 1881 Steamer 1.513 

John B. Lyon 1881 Steamer 1,330 

Cumberland 1881 Steamer 1,280 

Oceanica 1881 Steamer 1,241 

Rufus I'. Ranney..l881 Steamer 1,169 



SMALL VESSELS SCARCE. 



NEW CANADIAN STEAMER. 



The E. l'>. Osier, the new steamer launch- 
ed recently at the Niagara yards of the Can- 
adian Shipbuilding Company, is the largest 
freighter ever built there. This freighter is 
510 feet over all. 500 feet keel, fifty-six feel 
beam and thirty-one feet dee]), and is 
equipped with quadruple-expansion engines 
and Scotch boilers. Her construction is un- 
usually stanch, having as much steel worked 
into her as is usually put into a 550-footer. 
She has a lower stringer five feet below the 
spar-deck, extending from the hatch open- 
ing to the ship's side, and a girder of that 
deptli connecting the two stringers in line 
of hatches. The hatches are spaced 24-foot 
centers and are ten feet six inches wide, fore 
and aft. The steamer is built on the arch 
girder system, with arches every twelve feet. 
Her construction was superintended by 
Robert Curr, naval architect of Cleveland. 
The E. B. Osier is being built for the Chi- 
cago & St. Lawrence Steam Navigation 
Company of Toronto. 



The steamer Jay C. Morse of the Pick- 
ands & Mather fleet, brought Iter maiden 
cargo of ore to Conneaut on September 13. 
The Morse is a beauty and her crew are 
well satisfied. 



Captain W. C. Richardson has sold the 
wooden steamer Iroquois to the Montreal 
Transportation Company limited, of Mon- 
treal. The price was not given out. The 
Iroquois, which was turned over to her new 
owner at Windsor recently will be taken 
out of the general Lake trade. She will be 
operated in the coal trade between Oswego 
and Montreal. 

The Iroquois was built in 1892 and was 
rebuilt in 1903. She is 242 feet keel and 
forty-one feet beam. Her carrying capacity 
is about 2,600 tons. Captain 1'*.. J. Burke, of 
Detroit, sailed her for a number of season-,. 

A large number of small vessels have 
changed hands during the past year and 
about a do/.en ships of that class left the 
Lakes during that time. The local boats 
that were taken to the coast this season 
were the steel steamers William Chisholm 
and J. II. Deveraux and the wooden steamer 
A. I. Lindsay. 

Small carriers are getting scarce on the 
Lakes. Xo boats of that class have been 
built for a number of years and at times 
the shippers have trouble moving small car- 
goes. Before the strike of the dock-workers 
and the miners at the Head of Lake Su- 
perior the coal shippers had to pay an ad- 
vance of 10 cents over the contract figures 
on small cargoes to some ports. At the 
present time there is a liberal supply of big 
tonnage, but vessels of the 2.000 and 3,000- 
ton class are not very plentiful. 



LAKES TO THE GULF. 



PROSPECTIVE FREIGHT RECORD. 



Notwithstanding the unusually late open- 
ing of navigation and the decided falling 

off in Lake commerce during July in conse- 
quence of the strike of ore handlers and 
miners at the head of Lake Superior there 
is reason to believe that after all the stu- 
pendous amount of 60,000,000 net tons of 
freight will be transported through the St. 
Marys ship canals this season. Last year 
the traffic through this waterway connect- 
ing Lake Superior and Huron reached the 
record breaking figures of 51.751.080 tons. 
This season the movement of freight fell 
off a million and a half in April, the canals 
not opening until the twenty-second of that 
month, and because of the Mesaba Range 
strike troubles there was a further large 
decrease in July. In May, however, all past 
records were broken with a traffic of 7,884,- 
2i>? tons, and in June this was exceeded by 
a movement of 8,8(>5.442 tons. Now, with 
the August commerce of 8,554.833 tons, the 
total for the season is well above the 30,000,- 
000 ton mark, and there is little question 
that for the three and one-half months re- 
maining of interlake navigation approxi- 
mately 29,000,000 net tons of freight will 
be moved through the canals. 



The Canadian Lake line has purchased 
two more new steamers at Glasgow, Scot- 
land, and they are expected to arrive in 
this country this fall. They are both of 
steel construction, and of full canal size. 
They will touch at Cleveland on their trips 
to and from Montreal. 



The Lakes-to-Gulf Waterways Commis- 
sion will soon meet at Memphis, Tenn. Pres- 
ident Roosevelt and the Governors of about 
twenty States will also meet with them, anil 
the plans for a Lakes-to-Gulf waterway will 
be thoroughly discussed. The plan, accord- 
ing to dispatches in the Cleveland press, is 
to create a channel for deep draft vessels 
from Xew York to Xew Orleans, via Chi- 
cago. The route would be Xew York to 
Albany, via Hudson River, the Erie Canal to 
tin- Lakes, a canal through Michigan, from 
a point below Detroit to Lake Michigan, 
thence by way of the Chicago Drainage 
Canal to the Mississippi River. Looks pretty 
good, does it not? The hardest part of this 
route is the Mississippi River end of it. A 
line of dredges from St. Louis to Xew I >r- 
leans could not keep that old river in good 
behavior, and millions, ami billions, of dol- 
lars will be spent before a deep water vessel 
ever takes that little trip. 

W. H. Jl-NKl.XS. 

Conneaut, O. 



WORKING ON NEW DOCK. 



The new coal dock now being construct- 
ed by the Missabe road at Duluth will be 
one of the best at the Head of the Lakes. 
Tt will be equipped with the most modern 
unloading machinery and with an auto- 
matic dumping car for fueling vessels when 
required. 

The dock is 603 feet wide (outside meas- 
urement) and 1,800 feet in depth, extending 
from the shore just east of the Missabe ore 
docks clear to the harbor line of the north 
channel of St. Louis Lay. 

It will be solidly filled in with sand, 
washed in by hydraulic pumps, and the 
faces of the dock will be concrete, resting 
on cribs in like manner to the Duluth 
piers. The superstructure will be entirely 
of steel, and work on both this and the con- 
crete is under way. The channels around 
the docks will be dredged to twenty-two 
feet so that the modern 10.000-ton freighter 
will have no difficulty in discharging her 

cargo. 



THE WILTPEN'S MUSIC BOX. 



Captain Harry C. McCallum. the Assist- 
ant Inspector of Steamboats at Detroit, 
tells the following story on the electric 
piano which is installed on the new 
freighter Wiltpen. owned by the Shenango 
Steamship Company, of Pittsburg: 

"The organ," says the Inspector, "was 
placed on the boat for the joint amusement 
of passengers and the crew. 

"The other evening while one of the men 
was changing a selection the machine broke 
down. The men tried to repair it. and. 
failing, reported the accident to the captain. 

"'Cap,' said the man. 'dat box of melody 
is on de bum and won't go.' 

"'All right,' replied the captain, 'I'll 
speak to the engineer and have him fix it.'" 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



A 75-foot signaling station has been in- 
stalled near the entrance of Buffalo harbor 
and will give storm warnings by day and 
night. 



Lake captains arriving at Cleveland from 
the Head of the Lakes say that the work 
on the new Reading dock at Superior is 
progressing rapidly. The cribs will be put 
in place in a few weeks. The Berwind- 
White Coal Company's new dock, which 
was opened recently, is not completed yet, 
and will not be for a few weeks. It is one 
of the largest on the Lakes. 



The old tug and excursion steamer Car- 
rington sank on Auust 23 in Lake Super- 
ior. Captain Frechette was bringing her 
back from Ashland, when she began leak- 
ing badly. The pumps were worked in 
vain, and, hailing the steamer Frederick R. 
Wells, Captain Frechette put his men on 
board. In a few minutes the abandoned 
Carrington went to the bottom. 



The steamer Corunna, which arrived on 
the Lakes from Europe a few weeks ago, 
reached Cleveland recently for the first 
time. She is one of three steamers recently 
bought on the other side for the Canadian 
Lake Company, for which Captain Phillpott 
has the agency at Cleveland. The Corunna 
is a stanch craft, fitted out with modern ac- 
commodations and equipment for passen- 
ger traffic. 



The owners of the steamer Maryland 
have filed a libel against the steamer Tus- 
caroa for $57,000 for damages at Detroit. 
The steamers were in collision in the St. 
Clair River about a month ago and both 
boats were badly damaged. Repairs on 
the Maryland have just been completed. 
The Maryland is owned by the Valley 
Transit Company of Milwaukee. The Le- 
high Valley Transit Company of Buffalo 
owns the Tuscarora. 



The Salt Lake City is building for W. 
A. and Capt. Arthur H. Hawgood, of Cleve- 
land. She is 552 feet over all, 532 feet keel, 
56 feet beam and 31 feet deep. The new 
boat will have triple expansion engines, 
with cylinders 22>y 2 , 38 and 63 inches, with 
42-inch stroke. Steam will be furnished by 
two Scotch boilers 14^ feet in diameter 
and 11^2 feet long. The boilers, which will 
be allowed 180 pounds of steam, will be 
fitted with the Ellis & Eaves draft. 



Word comes from Green Bay that the 
sailors of the Evelyn, an old steamer ply- 
ing between Oshkosh and Green Bay, have 
deserted her, fearing that there is a ghost 
on board. They have circulated this story 
far and near and the captain is said to be" 
having a hard time of it filling their places. 
The men say the ghost of a man who re- 
cently fell overboard from the steamer fre- 
quently has been seen pacing the deck at 
night. This is what caused the trouble. 



The United States Steamboat Inspectors, 
who have been investigating the overturn- 
ing of the tug Gee at Buffalo on Auust 21, 
report that no one is to blame for the af- 
fair. Inspectors Pope and Schumacher re- 
viewed the testimony of Captain Thomas 



Higgins and Thomas McMahon, the two 
survivors of the crew of the Gee, and as 
a result of their findings report : "There 
was no violation of the rules governing 
navigation, nor is there any evidence tend- 
ing to place the responsibility for the acci- 
dent upon any person." 



According to a telegram received recent- 
ly from Buffalo the new steamer \V. M. 
Mills arrived there with a cargo of 12,000 
tons of ore. This is the record, for the 
port of Buffalo, and the W. M. Mills car- 
ried it on her maiden trip. She left the 
Lorain yards of the American Shipbuilding 
Company two weeks ago and went up light 
on her first trip. The W. M. Mills belongs 
to the Western Transit Company, of North 
Tonawanda, with the William B. Kerr, the 
William A. Rogers and I,e Grand S. De- 
Graff. 



Demand the union label on all products 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 
ville. 



Robert Reesor, No. 5174, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with 
G. O. Reesor, 103 Fuller street, Toronto, 
Canada. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
. AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Third Street 

OGPENSBURO, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT.. CANADA Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC. WIS 725 Quay Street 

BRIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANI >PSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH : CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Dulutb. Minn. 
Bscanaba, Mich, 
c li.i ml I laven. Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mi' h. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Sic. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich, 
Sturgeon Hay Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



We Don't Patronize. 



FOOD AND KINDREM PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
theim & Schiffer, of New York f'itv: Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Flour — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co.. Minneapolis, 
Minn.: Vnlley City Milling Co . Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — James Butler. New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 
Whiskey — Finch Distilling Company. Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia. Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. ; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — J. IT. Cownie Glove Co.. Des Moines. Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats— J. B. Stetson Company. Philadelphia. Pa.; 10. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn. N. Y. : Henry II. Roe- 

lof & Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company. 

Troy, N. Y. ; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy. N. Y.; 

Cluett, Penbody K- Co.. Troy, N. Y.; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUP.LIOATIONS. 
Bookbinders — Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printinn — Hudson. K imberlev & Co.. printers, of Kan- 
sas City. Mo.; W. B. Conkev & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond. Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, CLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, III.: Corning Rrick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement — Portland Peninsular Cement Company, Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utiea Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co.. Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

CarriaTe and Wagon Builders — S. R. Raily & Co., Am- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark. Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Brown & Sharpe Tool 
Company, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia. Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden, N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville. III.: Casev & Hedges. Chattanooga. 
Tenn.; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company). Rutland. Vt. : Er'e City Iron 
Works. Erie. Pa.; Sinser Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.: Pittsbure Expanded Metal Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa.: American Ro'St and Derrick Co.. St. Paul, 
Minn.: Standard Fewinsr Machine Company. Cleve- 
land. Ohio; Manitowoc Dry I lock Company, Manito- 
woc, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo.; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont. ; Home Stove 
Works. Indianapolis. Ind.; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo, 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis. Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Leo Broom and I luster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons. Circle- 
ville, Ohio; Merkle-W r iley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio; O. Wisner Piano Company Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co.. Philadelphia. Pa.: J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumber — Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Taeonia Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash,; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolia, 

Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co.. Norfolk. N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Rayniondsville. N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper — William Bailev K- Sons Cleveland. Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. .1. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.: Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany. Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth— Thos. io. Gleeson, East Newark, N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Bill Posters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland. Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co., and New York Bill Posting Co.. New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddington Hotel. Wilkesbaire, Pa. 
Railways — Atchison. Topeka ami Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri. Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Thoms Taylor & Son, Hudson. Mass. 

C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grape Nuts ami Postum 
Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MAGICAL GARY. 



It is authoritatively announced that the 

United States Steel Corporation will invest 
additionally $45,000,000 in the city of Gary. 
To those who do not know that Gary is a 
creation of that threat steel corporation, de- 
signed as a home for an immense steel- 
producing plant, the foregoing sentence is 
not intelligible. This city, which is a con- 
sequence of these works, is built on a large 
tract of land on the shore of Lake Michigan. 
in Indiana, across the lake from the city of 
Chicago. In the works men by the tens of 
thousands are to be employed. 

The city is intended to accommodate a 
population of 300.000. Without its building 
there would not be sufficient accommoda 
tions for the men employed in the works 
and for their families. So, with the wave of 
a wand the magic of which is abundant cap- 
ital, a great city is brought into being. 
Work was begun two years ago. To-day 
what was then an arid sand plain bears a 
large city. Broadway, the chief thorough- 
fare, has been constructed to its length of 
three miles. For two miles it now has pave- 
ments and sidewalks of concrete, and for 
that distance is lined by blocks of business 
buildings ready for the dealers. By Octo- 
ber 1 a sufficient number of the houses will 
be completed in the residence districts to 
shelter 50.000 people. The sewerage, gas, 
electric and water systems are ready for use. 
And now, at this stage of development, the 
corporation finds that it must appropriate 
$45,000,000 more than its first investment 
of $75,000,000, to be used in widening the 
scope of its steel plant. 

There are other communities of a popula- 
tion of 300.000 and larger, indeed; but all 
of them are of natural growth and develop- 
ment. Never before in the history of city 
building has a city even approaching this 
population sprung into existence, as it were, 
overnight as has Gary. When it begins its 
municipal life it will do so on equal terms in 
all its equipments with those which have 
taken a hundred years in which to grow. It 
i>. indeed, the marvel of the day. 

It seems to be customary to call this a 
model city. In the term is suggested that 
new and advanced theories of sociology will 
be applied. There have been such cities 
builded, and Pullman is a notable instance. 
Success has not attended them. There is no 
intention on the part of the steel corporation 
to make the city of Gary a model city in that 
sense. It will have a charter as other cities 
have. A municipal government will be es- 
tablished as in other cities. It will have its 
own self-government, and it must work out 
its own destiny, as other cities have — as 
Steelton, in Pennsylvania, the home of the 
Pennsylvania Steel Works, which it resem- 
bles except in size, has done. A few years 
ago the Mayor of Steelton was a roller man 
in the works. A majority of the directors 
of the various banks were employes of the 
mills. The property of the city was, in the 
main, possessed by the employes. And they 
were all independent of the steel works. 
These conditions yet obtain. The expec- 
tancy of the great steel corporation is that 
similar conditions will obtain in Gary. That 
corporation wanted great works at that 
point. Its tens of thousands that would be 
employed must be housed, with their fami- 
lies. Hence the city of Gary. The corpora- 
tion gives to it a fair start, and will sell its 



residential and commercial property will- 
ingly to those who will buy. It does not in- 
tend to assume paternalism. 

It is a large-minded enterprise, which is 
not to be conducted in antagonism to Ameri- 
can principles or to the American philosophy 
of development. It was a marvelous con- 
ception, and has been carried to fruition with 
marvelous celeritv. — Brooklyn Eagle. 



RICHEST GOLD CAMP. 



The official figures just received from 
Johannesburg show that the gold output 
in the Rand district in the Transvaal field 
in South Africa was about $55,000,000 for 
the five months of 1907 covered by the re- 
port. It amounted to $120,000,000 for 
1906. At the rate of production which has 
been shown from the beginning of January 
to the end of May this year the yield for 
the twelve months of 1907 will be consid- 
erably greater than that of 1906, which was 
$20,000,000 above that of 1905, and the 1905 
output broke all records up to its time. 

Rut the labor question here intrudes it- 
self. The Campbell-Pannerman Ministry of 
England has prevented the further importa- 
tion of Chinese coolies, who did most of the 
work in the Rand mines, and it has decided 
to send back to their own country the 
16,000 Chinese mine workers who are al- 
ready in the Rand. This makes the situa- 
tion for the mine owners rather dark. They 
were forced to go to China for laborers 
by the fact that none were to be had at 
home. Whites refused to do the work, and 
the native blacks could not be obtained in 
sufficient numbers. There is a possibility, 
therefore, that the continuous gold increase 
of the past few years will now be checked 
for a time, although it seems likely, on ac- 
count of the start which was obtained early 
in the year, that 1907 will pass the big 
record which was made by 1906. 

The world has an interest in those labor 
troubles to the Rand. Tf the world's rich- 
est gold camp should diminish its output 
the effect would be felt in the money mar- 
ket everywhere. The United States will be 
second on the roll of gold producers in 
1907, as it was in 1906, but the United 
States' yield will probably not go much 
above $100,000,000 this year. The big in- 
crease in annual gold production is one of 
the causes of the business expansion and 
the high prices of labor and commodities in 
recent years. A drop in production in the 
Transvaal would have to be serious to make 
the world's annual yield shrink, for Aus- 
tralia and one or two other countries as 
well as the United States are increasing 
their output. The world's business, how- 
ever, calls for a continuous increase in the 
gold yield, and this fact makes the Rand 
situation interesting to every great com- 
mercial country. — St. Louis Globe-Demo- 
crat. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
0E AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cat., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. Wash., 3004 MrCarver St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSKNT). Wash., 114 Qulnry St. 
ABERDKF.N. Wash., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, Or., 51 Union Ave. 
EUREKA. Cat.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU. H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
RAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT! E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cat., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



Native Chinese papers state that the Chinese 
press will in future be controlled by the Min- 
istry of Posts and Communications. The fol- 
lowing new laws are proposed : The press 
shall not be permitted to attack either the Gov- 
ernment or the administration. Nothing in 
the nature of a personal attack shall be pub- 
lished, nor shall any secret document of the 
Government be inserted. These laws will be 
put in operation after the advice of the Minis- 
ters has been secured 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Or., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Dietrich Doerflin, born 1861, is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco, Cal. 

Ludwig Luhrs, a nat've of Altona, Germany, is 
inquired for by the German Consul at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

August Ferdinand Johansen is inquired for by 
his brother, Otto Wilhelm Johansen. Address 
British ship Craighall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Bror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derhults, Forsamlin, Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martell, a native of Finland, aged about 
47, last heard of on the Pacific Coast about 15 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg, Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago, is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing his present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Ferndale, Wash. 

fvar Walter Lindblom. native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address. 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis. Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years, 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



GROWTH OF POPULATIONS. 



The new issue of the German Statistical 
Year Book gives an interesting survey of 
the increase of population in most countries 
on earth. This array of figures deserves 
close attention on political, military and 
social grounds. But in comparing the dif- 
ferent countries it is necessary to keep in 
mind that there is natural difference in the 
increase of population between thinly peo- 
pled districts and countries already well 
filled up. In the former case there is 
greater potentiality and probability of in- 
crease, because there is more room for new- 
comers who wish to profit by the chances 
of first occupation. 

There are many instances from which 
this essential difference may be made ob- 
vious. In the United States the most 
densely populated divisions of the Atlantic 
Coast and of the center we find an average 
yearly increase of from 1.6 to 1.9 per cent, 
while in the Southern and Western States 
the increase goes up to 2.3 and 2.7 per cent 
respectively. By the way, we notice that as 
a whole the United States may still boast 
of a considerably higher increase than the 
large countries of Europe; but if we take 
into consideration that in the last years the 
influx of foreign immigrants accounts for 
more than 1 per cent of the yearly increase 
of the population, the total average of 1.89 
f>er cent does not strike us as very impres- 
sive, especially if we consider that the great 
transatlantic Republic, with a density of 
only a little over eight persons per square 
kilometer, is in this respect so much left 
behind by the European great powers. The 
same proportion between density and in- 
crease of population may be, with even 
more strikinc force, deduced from the fig- 
ures jriven for the Australian continent. 
There we find in the most thinlv populated 
colony of Western Australia the high an- 
nual increase of ll 1 ^ per cent, while in the 
most closely populated colony of Victoria 
the increase amounted to only l / 2 per cent 
annually. The same rule is borne out by a 
comparison of the various states of South 
America, where the thinly populated Argen- 
tine Republic shows the largest increase, 
namely, 3 per cent per year. If the eco- 
nomic prosperity of this country like that 
of Australia keeps up its present growth it 
may be safely predicted from the figures at 
hand that the increase of population in these 
thinlv peopled parts of the world is bound 
to show in future a much more rapid devel- 
opment than even in the first few years of 
the last century. 

Where a considerable increase of popula- 
tion goes together with an already high de- 
gree of density, we are safe in drawing the 
inference that the national wealth and the 
political state of the country must be in a 
most satisfactory condition. Such benight- 
ed countries are, as these statistics indi- 
cate, the United Kingdom and the Empire 
of Germany. Despite her enormous supe- 
riority in the density of population, Ger- 
many, with a yearly increase of 1 1-9 per 
cent, follows close upon the heels of the 
United States, the Argentine Republic and 
Australia. This is all the more remarkable 
because in Germany's case there is no ex- 
cess of immigrants over emigants, so that 
the whole increase has merely natural 
causes, that is, the excess of births over 
deaths. Not quite so large is the increase 



of population in England ; but if we con- 
sider that the density of population of Eng- 
land is nearly double that of Germany (215 
against 112 people per square kilometer), 
we are bound to estimate the annual in- 
crease of the English nation as extremely 
large. A depressing contrast to that bright 
statistical aspect is offered by Ireland, as 
the only country of Europe where, despite a 
thin population, a decrease of one-half per 
cent is noticeable. 

This unfavorable development of Ireland 
may be a slight consolation for France by 
way of comparison, for the increase of pop- 
ulation in this large and fertile country is 
quite insignificant. It amounted, according 
to the last census, to only .15 per cent, so 
that, with the exception of Ireland, France 
is left behind by all other countries of 
Europe. All the more remarkable is this 
poor show, because the density of popula- 
tion in France is by no means considera- 
ble; it is by one-half lower than that of 
Germany and Ttalv and amounts only to 
one-third of that of England. France is al- 
ready on the point that under the influence 
of unsanitary conditions the insignificant 
surplus mav be changed into a loss of pop- 
ulation. Political adventures that might 
cause a "bleeding cure" are, therefore, from 
statistical considerations, not recommenda- 
ble for the French nation. — Continental 
Correspondence. 



DWELLINGS IN BOHEMIA. 



The Bohmische Sparkasse, the oldest, 
largest and wealthiest savings institution 
of Bohemia, has announced that on the occa- 
sion of the coming sixtieth jubilee of the 
Emperor's reign it will devote a sum of 
$240,000 for the endowment of cheap cot- 
tages for workmen. Advantage will be 
taken of a bill which passed the Austrian 
Parliament on July 20, 1902, granting twen- 
ty-four years' exemption to such cottages 
or dwellings as are erected on open building 
ground or on an area of houses demolished 
to the ground, provided these cottages or 
dwellings are erected for the specific pur- 
pose of procuring cheap and healthy resi- 
dences for laborers and employes of all 
kinds, and provided further that such dwell- 
ings come up to the sanitary requirements 
specified in the bill. 

On April 11, 1906, the Diet of Bohemia 
also passed a bill granting to such dwell- 
ings a remission of the provincial and local 
taxes for the same term of years as fixed 
for the exemption for Imperial Government 
taxation. A local paper says that though 
the Imperial Government's bill has been in 
operation since 1902, nothing, or compara- 
tively little, has been done for improving 
the dwellings of the laboring classes, thus 
furnishing a proof that in dealing with hu- 
manitarian problems simple legislation re- 
mains ineffectual without private co-opera- 
tion. Commenting further upon this dona- 
tion, the paper says that it bears the stamp 
of true American style, "endowments for 
great purposes." The initiative taken by 
the Bohmische Sparkasse is the more wel- 
comed by the public as it is confidently be- 
lieved that others may be induced to follow 
the example. 



During 1906 immigrants to the number of 
1,221 arrived in Chile, against 293 for 1905 
and 4,000 for the first four months of 1907. 



EARTHQUAKES AND VOLCANOES. 



There is no foundation for the view gen- 
erally held that great earthquakes are 
caused by volcanic eruptions, says Profes- 
sor R. A. Gregory, writing in the London 
Sunday at Home. It is true that rumblings 
are heard and shocks felt before a volcano 
bursts into activity and during the subse- 
quent eruption, owing to the subterranean 
explosions of the imprisoned water vapor 
and various gases, but though every active 
volcano gives spasmodic shocks, these 
movements are rarely felt over more than 
a limited area. On the other hand, the 
greatest earthquakes — those that shake the 
whole earth about fifty times every year, 
have their origin in regions where there arc 
no volcanoes. 

A volcano is a pin-prick in the earth's 
surface, and it serves to relieve the local 
pressure by permitting the escape of steam 
and molten rock ; but an earthquake is pro- 
duced in most cases by a sudden fracture 
of the solid substructure of a large region, 
and as the ^reat mass of material slips into 
a new position, the shock causes the crust 
of the earth to shiver from pole to pole. 
These dislocations are naturally most fre- 
quent in regions where mountain ranges are 
apparently still being squeezed up — where 
rocky folds are still being bent into shape, 
as in the Himalayas, and off the west coasts 
of North and South America, and the North 
of Japan. -Regions of greatest stability of 
the earth's crust are, in fact, found chiefly 
along the margins of continents or table- 
lands which rise suddenly to considerable 
heights above oceanic or other plains. Com- 
paratively few earthquakes have their 
origin near to volcanoes, and the general 
belief that all great earthquakes are due to 
volcanic eruptions is not supported by evi- 
dence derived from observations. 

Great fractures of the earth's structure 
seem, however, in some cases to be fol- 
lowed by increased volcanic activity, though 
little is yet known of the nature of this 
relationship. Professor John Milne has 
found that all known volcanic eruptions 
which have occurred in the Antilles, from 
the first which took place in 1692, have 
been heralded or closely accompanied by 
large earthquakes in that region, but more 
frequently by similar disturbances in neigh- 
boring rock-folds, particularly that of the 
Cordilleras of Central America. In April, 
1902, a severe earthquake occurred in Gua- 
temala, and a week later volcanoes in Mar- 
tinique and St. Vincent showed signs of 
the activity which culminated in the devas- 
tation of large parts of these islands. An- 
other instance occurred at the end of Jan- 
uary last year, when a great earthquake 
which originated off the mouth of the Es- 
meralda River in Colombia was followed a 
few days later by the eruption of the Mount 
Pelee and La Soufriere volcanoes. A con- 
vulsion in Central America may, therefore, 
be taken as a warning of eruptions or shocks 
in the West Indian islands ; but though 
volcanic activity may follow an earthquake 
of unusual severity, it must be regarded as 
an effect of the disturbance rather than the 
cause. 



The cultivation of rice in the State of Rio 
Grande do Sul, Chile, has proceeded to a 
point where it is declared an unqualified suc- 
cess. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



An Ami Asiatic League, based on 
sound lines, has recently been formed 
in N\w Zealand. 

A Miners' Eight-Hour bill lias 
passed its first reading in the Brit- 
ish House of Commons. 

British Amalgamated Society of 
Railway Servants is voting on the 

tion of striking to secure hi 
wages, an eight-hour day. at least nine 
hours' interval between hours on duty, 
and recognition of the union. 

Exclusive of seamen, the number of 
British workpeople reported killed in 
the course of their employment dur 
ing July, 191)7, was 227, an increase 
oi 3 as compared with the previous 
month, and of 23 as compared with 
July, I 

The total number of cases of pois- 
oning and of anthrax reported to the 
British Home Office under the Fac 
tory and Workshops Act during July 
57, there being 53 cases of lead 
poisoning, and 4 of anthrax. Six 
deaths due to lead poisoning wctv re 
pi irted. 

The agrarian strike is growing in 
the vicinity of Canosa, Italy, and the 
whole country is in a state of ti 
Pickets armed with shotguns prevent 
farmers from going to their fields. 
striker was shot dead and a mob was 
formed to lynch the guard who was 
responsible for the deed. 

The Maritime Federation at Ant 
werp on September 16 presented a 
proposal which was accepted by the 
striking dock-laborers and others, call- 
ing for an unconditional return to 
work and the appointment of a mixed 
commission with powers to examine 
and determine upon the question of 
wages. 

As a result of the Antwerp dockers' 
strike the mills are short of corn, 
compelling them to close, and caus- 
ing the price of bread to advance. 
It is said that the Brussels Federa 
tion, which is composed of Germans 
and Swiss, have brought the strike 
about in order to ruin Antwerp as a 
port and build up Hamburg instead. 

The International Congress of Min- 
ers, at Saltzburg, Austria, on Septem 
ber 1'^. adopted a resolution opposing 
any restriction of the output of coal. 
The Americans voted affirmatively. A 
resolution in favor of a legal prohibi 
tion of the employment of children 
under 14 in mining, or under 16 in 
underground work, also was adopted. 

At the Woollongong (Australia) 
Quarter Sessions, two miners named 
Joseph Lewis and John Gowan, were 
each sentenced to four months' im- 
prisonment for unlawfully conspiring 
at the South Bulli colliery to fraud- 
ulently secure working places for 
themselves, by manipulating the ballot 
at the quarterly cavil for places in the 

pit. 

Troops and police made a sudden 

ent on September 20 upon the 
large cotton mill at Lodz. Russia, 
owned by Marcus Siberstien, who was 
murdered by his employes on Septem- 
ber 13 because, as alleged, he refused 
to pay them for the % time they were 
out on strike. Eight hundred of the 
workmen were taken into custody. 

I let ween 40,000 and 50,000 members 
of the British Boiler Makers' Society 
will be locked out on October 5. The 
men affected are employed chiefly at 
the East Coast ports, at Barrow and 
on the Clyde. The chief grievance of 
the employers is that the executive 
committee of the Boiler Makers' So- 
ciety has no real power, and can not 
force the men to observe any agree- 
ment which may be adopted. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Succewor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots, Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe-$2.00 to $5.00-Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period If 
nut called or sent for. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered ami shipped 
to any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG Till-: COAST. 





SMOKE, 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the 


'Lit- 


tie 


Beauty,' the "Princess" 


and 


other high gradeunlon-madecigars. 




Manufactured by 






C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street, Eureka, 


Cal. 



Adams, Joseph 
Aga, Johan 
Akesson, H. 
Allendsen, H. 
A 1 be is, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 
Amnell, A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
Anderson, H. M. 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Victor 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Ciller. Syrups, Sarsaparilla and iron. 
etc. Soli' agents for Jackson's Napa 

So, la. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 

Board and lodging. $5 per week. Single 

meals, 26c. Beds, 25c and BOc. 

522 First St., between D and E. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

4:;:i SECOND STREET, COR, F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

Union Label Goods. 

A. UOSENSTEIN, Prop. 
23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore. 

Phone Clay 685. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Arras, Moritz 
Andersen, -1550 
Anderson, A. 
Andersen, Fritjof 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bergh, Edw. 
Bawens, Edemon 
Bjorkas, Herman 
Boose, Paul 
Bluhm, Peter 
Dalton, Thos. H. 
Eliassen, O. E. 
Elving, Gust 
Ehlers, Henry 
Eriksen. E. 
Enzbretsen, Dan. B. 
Gordlad, Arthur 
Gustafson, E. A. 
Goethe, Victor B. 
Griel, B. 
Hartman. Karl 
Helms, Wm. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Harrald 
Irers, John 
Jaensen, Hans 
Jacobsson, John 
Johannessen, Hani 

H. 
.Tansen, -1728 
Janson, Oscar 
.Tohanson, A. J. 
Jorgensen, Ernst 
Kristoffersen, Emll 
Kaderhecht, Alf. 
Karls80n, A. M. 



Kaufold, E. 
Lyche, H. M. 
Lettve, Honore 
Lang, G. 
Lindstrom, Emll 
Lindeman. A. 
Le Fever, Louis 
Maack, Hans 
Nordstrom, Knut 

Olaf 
Nurmi, E. W. -865 
Nurminen, J. V. 
Olsen. Arthur G. 
Olsen. Albert 
Ordig, Bruno 
Petersen, Ed. 
Pettersson, G. E. 
Petterson, Harald 
Petterson, Mauritz 
Raetz, Aug. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Russell, Ed. 
Svendsen, Thorval 
Selander, Gust 
Swanson, Ivar 
Smith, Max 
Schmidt, E. 
Staaf, Louis 
Thomson, John 
Tyrholm, Johan 
Udd, John 
Vincent, Joseph 
Walter, M. 
Westin, John 
Wllsen, Anders 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 
FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Elates. 

Front Street, between C and D. 

EUREKA, CAL. 





FOR A 




GOOD 


CUP OF 


COFFEE 


OR 


A SQUARE 
TRY 


MEAL 


EUREKA CHOP 


HOUSE 


Cor. Second and D St., 


Eureka, Cal. 


A. K. 


ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOAR I i AMi LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 

Neatest ami Cleanest Place in Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 


Clothing and 


Furnishing Goods 


BOOTS, SHOES 


, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 


TNION 1. 


ABEL GOO] '8 


PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 
Deals exclusively in union-ma 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

I 'ill at ins old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the I'nion Office. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

i Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon. Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Ine.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stoek of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commereial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton flannel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Helenius, K. 
Henning, L. 
Hikellct, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg, W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holti. J. W. 
Honde, P. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustlde, H. 
ilultberg, E. J. 
Ingebretsen, John 



Anderson, L. T. -735 Ingebretsen, Karl 
Anderson, Hjalmar Ingalls. W. L. 
Anderson, Oscar Iversen, S. B. 



Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen, -1520 
A pps, P. 

Appelquist, O. T. 
Arnesen, Martin 
Aspen, K. D. 
Austin, M. M. 
Bateman, S. J. 
Berg. Albert 
Bernard, S. 
Belin, Erik 
Bensen, F. 
Bernert. F. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bensen, J. E. 
Berg, H. M. 
Bee, Colin 
Berkelund, R. 
Bindseil, W. 
Billington, J. M. 
Bjornholm, H. 
Blecka, A. 
Blomberg, G. 
Botgereist, L. 
Boose, P. 
Bratrud, O. M. 
Braa, P. O. 
Brunstrom, G. 
Bronelew, W. 
Brewer, W. 
Brown, F. 
Bryning, W. 
Brown, James 
Burk, C. 
Buektman, F. 
Bundersen, Jens 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlsen, Hans 
Capello, H. 
Carlson, A. 
Carlson, R. -656 
J Carlson, J. -861 
I Chotard, Emil 
J Clewley, James 
Clark, S. D. 
Clauson, C. L. 
Cortes, P. 
Cook, H. 
Corl, V. 
Craig, C. A. 
Christensen, O. 
I >anlelsen, David 
Daniels, C. 
Danielsen, Ernest 
Dennett, J. 
Deboth, Paul 
Doran, Eugene 
i Dorest, A. C. 
Uohman, F. 
Duncure, Y. 
Dudler. H. 
Edson, F. 
Edvardsen, J. 
Ekeland, S. 
Ellingsen, H. 
Eltman. H. 
Englund, R. 
Englund, L. F. 
Engberg, O. 
Erikson. Olav 
Eriksen, Allen 
l-.'riksen, Viktor 
Eriksen, Konrad 
Eriksen, Aug 
Eskola, H. 
Evans. S. 
Ferraris. J. 
Fernandez, D. 
Fitzgerald. H. 
Fisher, T. 
Flynn, P. 
Karlson, G. -422 
Frivold. J. J. 
Fredrlksen, W. 
Fricke. C. 
Frankenberg, V. 
Garbers, H. 
Gad, V. 
Camber, Jas. 
Gerner, Hans 
Genstrom, F. 
Ooerke. E. 
Godt. W. 
Grower. Alton 
Grunbolk, J. 
Green, J. 
Gnnnason, J. 
Gundersen. G. 
Gunther, Rlchari 
Gundersen, And. 
Gustafsen. Karl 
Gutman, H. 
Hansen. Fred 
Hansen. H. -1723 
Hay. W. -1179 
Harker. TTd. 
Haker. Max 
Hartnett. W. 
Hansen, Maurice 
Tin e'en. C. L. 
Hansen. H. C. 
Hansen. N. 
Haee. A. 
Halberg. O. 
Hardy. W. 
Hansen. Albert 
Hansen. W. 
Hanger. B. 
Hansen J. E. 
Haknnsen John 
Helms. "W. 
TTpidenhertr. G. 
trp rTT1 nrtsen. F. 
Henriks, G. 



F. 



Isaksen, I. 
Ivarsen, I. 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen, J. A. 
Jacobs, W. M. 
Jacobsen. Johan 
Jacobsen. H. M. 
Jacobsen, John 
Jack, P. 

Jacobsson, Johan 
Jensen, P. -1431 
Jensen. E. -1298 
Jensen, J. G. -1668 
Jensen, P. -748 
Jensen, J. G. -686 
Johansen, T. B. 
.Tohansen, A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johnsen, Aug. -1451 
Johnsen, Fr. 
Johnson, C. J. -1566 
Johnson, N. G. 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson. H. L. 
Johnson, Tim 
Johnsson, John A. 
Johnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 
Jonsson. A. J. 
Jones. Fred. 
Jorgensen. Alf. 
Jorgensen, Th. 
Jorgensen. J. A. 
Jurgenson. John 
Jordt, P .-1737 
Jurgenson. Ernest 
Kahlbetzer. F. 
Karlson, J. A. -388 
Kanford. Ed. 
Karlstrom. C. 
Karsimer, N. J. 
Kermagoret. A. 
Kelly. P. 
Kittelsen, K. 
Kinloch, W. 
Klemettilla. II 

Kloes, w. o. F. 
Klemensen, C. 

Knoff. It. 

Kristensen, E. -901 
Krause. E. 
Kreutz, C. 
Kristensen. K. D. 
Krager. H. 
Kristensen. G. 
Kroemke. N. 
Krouschet. A. T. 
Kristoffersen. Emil 
Kummerlowe, O. 
Lalx, N. E. 
Laine, W. E. -141 1 
Larsen, if. -957 
Larsen, K. H. 
Larsen, it. -1195 
Larsen, Mathias 
Larsen, Eingai 
Lemerle. C. 
Lepp. P. 

Le Fevre. L. 

Lersten, J. 

Lidgett. J. A. 
Lind. H. E. 
Lie. L. 

Linden. H Vandon 
Lindeman. H. 
Lie. J. L. 
Lorho, M. 
Lunde, O. 
Lundgren. R. 
Lubeck, R. A. 
Lysell, Geo. 
Mattson, F. 
Martinsen. K. 
Madsen. G. F. 
Mathlsen, M. 
Marthinsen, Kr. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Mahan, W. F. 
McKenzie, A. 
Meas. J. 
Mostrand. O. 

Mtetenan, J. 

Mid.io. A. 
Miller. C. W. 
Mikkelsen. Kr. 
Monehy, H. 
Merken. J. L. 
Muller. P. 
Muller. H. 
Munhy. J. W. 
Nass. Axel 
Nesbltt, James 
Nielsen, N. -751 
Nilsen. Edwin 
Nilsen. B. S. -731 
Nielsen. Anders 
Nilsen. Olans 
Nilsen. C. L. 
Nielsen. N. K. V. 
Nilsen. K. C. -972 
Nilsen. C. V. 
Nllson, C. J. -885 
Norris, J. E. 
Nolan. James 
Nvhagen. Julius 
Nystiom. Ragner 
Oextiger, O. 
Olsen. Ludvig 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Oscar 
olsen, Christ 
Olsen. Raynvald 
Olssen. Johan 
Olsen. K. E. 
Olsen. H. M. 
Olsen, Just. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT," OWNED BY A. 

M. BENDETSON, CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

UNION MADE HATS 

UNION MADE SHOES 

UNION MADE COLLARS 

UNION MADE SUSPENDERS 

UNION MADE GLOVES 

UNION MADE OVERALLS 

UNION MADE SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & 

G STREETS, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



GRIGGS' HARDWARE STORE 

SHIP CHANDLER 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street 

ABERDEEN, - - - WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 
EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



THE HUB 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING STORE 
L. FOGEL, Prop. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubebr Boots 
to a Talior-made Suit. 

405 HERON STREET. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Olsen, Leip. Sayland, A. 

Olsen, Ernst Solie, I. 

Osterberg, J. Sovig, M. 

Ossis, A. Senderman, G. 

Petersen, A. W. Soheland, O. N. 

Petersen, Paul Stenberg, Alt. 

Otto, L. Sten, Ivar 

Overland, T. Stervik, Louis 

Parkhurst, Thos. Sterr, W. T. 

Paulson, Hans Stuhr, H. M. 

Petersen, Ch. -990 strandquist, Louis 

Pettersen, Axel Steine I L 

Pedersen, L Stickles, ' L.' A. 

Petersen, Peter stein, A. -1883 

Pederson, K. -980 Stewart, P. 

Pederson, John Sveerd, S. H. 

Pendville, N. Swanson, Hugo 

Peterson, Mauritz svensson, G. A. -1295 

Penosch, P. Taylor, A. 

Plummer, Karl Tereutt M 

Prescott, F. F. Thomsen, P. -1432 

Pohler, Joseph Thomas, Wm. 

Polge, Louis Tnurl| E . H . 

Rahm, Carl Thomassen, K. 

Rasmussen, C. -551 Titus Ed 

Rasmussen, R. -525 Tipp,' Joseph 

Reuter, Ernest Tolaas, K. 

Remmel, T. Tornquist, M. 

Reimann, Carl Torqusen, K. 

Rikkartsen, H. -597 Tonnesen, John 

Richard, Andreas „ ,_ _ 

Rosen, Frank L. r "™ e T r ' ,?• B ' 

Rosen, E. H. Udd, John 

Rose, W. H. Unruh, Paul 

Ryberg, S. V 00 ^- c - 



Quetski, Herman 



Vierich, R. G. 



Savage, R. Wallrath, K 

Sampson, C. -2137 W-assemus, J" 
Sarin K Watts, E. K. 

Samu'elsen, H. -130lW a hlstedt, R. -778 
Schwartsloze, F. S>mp, S' £' 

Scherlan, R. Weber, O. C. 



Scott, E. G. 



Westad, Johan 



Schroeder, Aug. Westerholm. A. W. 

Schieman, E. -1744 Wikhlad, Otto 

Schaffer, P. Wennick, And. 

Schoffler, A. Westin, C. O. 

Sebelin, C. Wenniche. Haldor 

Selander, J. Westbroch, Joe 

Shane, J. Wilhelm, H. 

Simmonds, A. E. Wiking, Aug. 
Sikemeyer, W. • Willert, L. 

Sjoquist, G. Woadhull, C. 

Smith, Ed. Wurzbach, W. 

Smith, J. S. Wulff, M. 

Sorensen, H. -1106 York, J. 

Sohst, A. Zacko, K. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Behrman, a native of Olden 
burg, Germany, born 1858, is inquired 
for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 



EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m. except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonaple prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia ots., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

MeCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire-Latimer Block. Seattle, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone. Ind. 1713 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 
CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



WHEN IN BALLARD 
Visit the 
BOSTON CLOTHING HOUSE 
E. Goddman, Prop. 
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil- 
skins, etc., etc. 



WORKERS UNION 



UNIONrfJJ STAMP 

Factory No. 



Understand 



BROTHER 
UNIONISTS 



That the best made shoes — the shoes made under the best manu- 
facturing conditions — the shoes that best stand wear — bear the Union 
Stamp, as shown herewith. 

Ask your dealer for Union Stamp shoes, and if he cannot supply 
you, write 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION, 

246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 



^-~y -■-. jm ^ — ^ w w- » ^ -m — ^ ^->y See that this label (in light blue) 
.^■"■"m, |X./I ■ ■ W^ I 4 I— •»* ^"aav appears on the box from which 
<31 V 1 V^ IV I— *1V^^ y Z are served. 

Issued by Autlioiity of uie Ciga/ MaKers' International Union of Anient 

Union-made Cigars. 

Wto$ SpVtrfUtf. Tim the Clr/ars contained inlWs box haw been mad« by a MBIChSS WOINIBII 
aMf-WjCROf THE CIGAR UAXFR] 'IMTLRNATIOIUL UNION o< A«n.-iu. an organization devoted to the ad- 
vancement ol the MORAl.MATERtW.jnd INiaUClUAl Wll'AHI Of THt CRATr. Tberelorewe lotornnwij 
tjvjs* Cioars to ail smoker* throughout the world*. 

411 Infnnaemeou upon this label <rdl be purWwd acayding to law 




FAC 
" SIMILE 



Q. 7K (£U46u*4, President, 
V CMlUof 



News from Abroad. 



The Russian Admiralty has ordered 
a battleship of 22,300 tons from the 
Baltic Shipbuilding Works. 

The Governor-General of the Phil- 
ippines has issued a formal proclama- 
tion convening the National Assembly 
on October 16. 

Consular reports from Harbin, Man- 
churia, indicate that lack of rain has 
resulted in wheat being reduced to 
one-quarter of a crop. The price is 
rapidly advancing. 

A radical change as regards fuel for 
the Navy has been decided upon by 
the British Government. Hereafter, 
oil is to be substituted for coal at the 
various naval bases. 

Five officers and twenty-two men 
were killed and four officers and 
twelve men were wounded on board 
the Japanese battleship Kashima by 
the explosion of a ten-inch powdei 
charge at Tokio on September 17. 

The long-distance prize in the in- 
ternational balloon race was won on 
September 17 by the German balloon 
Pommern, piloted by Herr Erbslob. 
The Pommern came down at Bay- 
onne, France, 621 miles from Brus- 
sels. 

Florencio Morales and Bernardo 
Mora, who on June 6 were convicted 
and sentenced to death for the as- 
sassination of former Premier Baril- 
las, of Guatemala, were executed on 
September 9, ending an international 
episode. 

Travelers who arrive at Brala, Rou- 
mania, from Odessa declare that the 
anti-Jewish excesses there continue 
and it is estimated the deaths in the 
Russian city during the past week ex- 
ceeded 150. The police are prevent- 
ing Jews from leaving Odessa. 

Swedish army officials have applied 
to f he Government for a law forbid- 
ding the emigration of men between 
17 and 20 years of age, with a loss of 
inheritance rights as a penalty, and 
also for severe laws against emigra- 
tion agents. 

Twenty-two out of fifty-eight men 
on trial by court-martial at Riga, Rus- 
sia, charged with participation in the 
revolt in the Baltic provinces in 1905, 
have been condemned to death. Sev- 
eral hundred men have already been 
executed for their connection with 
that uprising. 

The plans for a new vessel of the 
Dreadnought class have been received 
at Portsmouth, Eng., accom'panied by 
orders to commence building the 
warship immediately. Her displace- 
ment will be 19,300 tons, 800 tons 
greater than the newly launched Bel- 
lorophon and Temeraire. 

The Duke of Orleans' expedition to 
Nova Zembla arrived at I lammerfest, 
Norway, on September 14 en route for 
Bergen. This expedition left Varde, 
Norway, on July 18, on board the 
yacht Carasa. The members of the 
party express great satisfaction at the 
result attained by the expedition. 

The Colliery Owners' Association 
of the Ipswich (Queensland) district 
have appointed representatives to con- 
fer with delegates of the Engine- 
drivers and Mechanics' Associations 
on tlie question of an increased rate of 
wages for the members of the latter 
association. 

The Sydney (Australia) Arbitration 
Court award in connection with the 
claims of the Shop Assistants' Union, 
makes the minimum wage for male 
shop assistants of nine years' cxpe- 
rience 2£ lOd per week, and £1 70 6d 
for females for a week of 53 hours. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



.Masons working in Havana de- 
mand payment in American money 
ami threaten to tie up all building 
work at Havana by striking. 

i he Philadelphia District Council of 
the Brotherhood of Carpenters re- 
cently voted to call its 4000 men on 
a general strike for an increase in 
wages. 

t lie convention of the Internation- 
al Association of Machinists at St. 
Louis, .Mo., on September 14 voted 
$10,000 lor the benefit of the Erie 
Railroad strikers. 

The 1'ostal Telegraph Company has 
begun suit in Chicago against the 
Telegraphers' Union for failure to pay 
for messages sent by the men after 
the strike had begun. 

Fifty-seven Japanese miners, arriv- 
ing at Atlin, Wash., on September 19 
to work in the mines were escorted to 
the river steamer Gleaner by 300 
whius and started back to Vancouver, 
B. C. 

Terrence V. Powderly, chief of the 
division of information of the Bu- 
reau of Immigration, has information 
certifying that places can be provid- 
ed for 256,400 men, women and chil- 
dren at wages ranging from $6 per 
week to $3.50 per day. 

The Canadian Trades and Labor 
Congress in annual session at Winni- 
peg, Can., on September 19 passed a 
resolution urging the abrogation 
of the treaty between Great Britain 
and Japan so as to pave the way for 
Japanese exclusion. 

J. 1'. Holland, president of the Na- 
tional Letter Carriers' Association, 
announced to the convention of that 
body that he would not be a candidate 
for re-election, owing to the attitude 
assumed toward him by the Post- 
office officials. 

Under the name of the Producers 
and Consumers' International Equity 
Union and Co-operative Exchange, a 
central body has been formed at Clii- 
on such broad lines that all pres- 
ent organizations among the farmers 
can affiliate with it. 

The threatened strike of the tin- 
playes of the Louisville Railway Com 
pany, which was believed to be in- 
evitable, has been averted for the 
present at least owing to an arrange- 
ment reached through the interven- 
tion nf Mayor Bingham. 

The strike of shoe cutters at St. 
Louis, • Mo., resulted in a general 
strike of shoe workers on September 
20, and eighteen shoe factories, em- 
ploying 30,000 workmen, are idle. 
The lasters, edgcmakers, trimmers, 
bottomers, stock litters and stitchers 
walked out in sympathy with the cut- 
lers. 

The Telegraphers' Eight-Hour 
law passed by the Missouri Legisla- 
ture was declared unconstitutional 
by Judge Bradley of the Circuit 
Court at Harrisonville, Mo., on 
September 19. The railway attor- 
neys argued that the law favored one 
class of workingmen more than other 
classes. 

rctarv of Commerce and Labor 
Straus announces that President 
Roosevelt is enthusiastic about per- 
fecting the national organization for 
promoting industrial peace, the foun- 
dation for which was assured by the 
$65,000 bestowed on the President as 
tin- recipienl of the Nobel Peace 
Prize. The Secretary stated that La- 
bur Commissioner Neil is to be made 
Secretary of the organization, and a 
popular subscription of $1,000,000 is to 
be raised. 



Letters at the Son Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at tii'' expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 



Aasen, Alfred 

Paul 
Abrahamsen, John 

ibrahamson, Carl 
Ahlborg, it. YV. 
A lander, a. 
Albright, Emil 

\lksne. August 

\ii, in, Fred 

MI'll. -1 186 

Amundsen, F. A. 

is. -1388 
Andersen. Prank 
Andersen, < tscar 
Andersen, -1156 

Andersen. -1274 
n. -1284 
[lark, E. E., 
Ball horn, Chr. X. 
Banke, -lfii6 
Barria, Nick 
Bauer, Frank 

k, -ir.il 
Baumann, E. 
i. w. J. 
Becker, Fred w. 
Beer, Franklin II. 
I .k. E. 
Bengtsson, J. 
Benson, John F. 
I', iggulst, Brail 
Berglund, Nile P. 
Bergstrom, Frank 
Bjordal, Gunder 
Bjork, Algol 
BJorknoim, G. A. 
Bjoriistad, N. M. 
Blmdlielm, O. C. 
Blomkvlat, Karl 
Caldwell, Wm. M. G. 
Canning, .Ions 
Carlsen, Th. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Edvard 
Carlson, Hans 
Carlson, Conrad 
Carlsson, -1132 
Carron, Edw. 
Chambers, A. G. 
Christiansen. M. F. 

Christiansen, -545 
Christiansen, 
Dahl, Olaf 
1 am. i IttO 

! annevig, M. 
I i vis. Fred 
De Baere, Henry 
Dempster, J. 
Disorder, Peter 
Easton, 1 'avid 
Ecklerleln, Franz 
Eckert, W. F. 
Edelmarin, G. 
Edler, Carl 
Edolf, C. 
Eglit, F. S. 
Ekman, Carl 
Ekwall, Gus. A. 
Ellefsen, Andreas 
[•'abrlcius, II. 
Fanning, Chris 
Ferraris, Joseph 
Fichter, Philip 
Fleck, -188S 
Flynn, Paddy 
Foil is. Geo. 
Folts, Frank 
Forstrom, H. 
Gabrielsen. ECnud 
Gabrlelsen, C. W. 
Gabrielsen, E. 
■ad, Sophus 
Gardell, Chris 
( iartz, W'm. 
Geiger, Joe 
Gibbs, Harry 
Goedhoop, ll. 
Gorjussen, G. T. 
Gower, John 
Hadberg, H. 
.lagin, B. O. 
.laglund, Mr. 
Haldorsen, Adolf 
Hall, Win. T. 
i lalvorsen, < lue 
lalvorsen, Olaf 
Halvorsen, -595 

I l;,»lvui sen. 
lalvorsen, -1418 
Halvorsen. M. 
i [ana, i ilaf i > 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, -1606 
Hansen. Frithjof 
Hansen, -1260 
Hansen, -1090 
Hansen, -968 

Hansen, L769 

I [ansen, -1729 
Hansen, a. C. 
i lansen, I.. P. 
Hansen, Hjalmar 

Hansen. -896 
Hansen. Hans P. 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hanson. -1609 
llans.n. -1!»06 
Harrison, John T. 
Hartmann, G. 
Hartwig, Kurt 
Hassall. G. 

Isaacson, Q. 10 

Jackson. C. L. 
Ambroa 
Jakobsen, -1&41 
en, -1686 
Jakobsen, N. S. 
Jakobsen, Ole 
Jamieson, Joe 
Jansen. K. 
J ansen, -944 
Jarvle, w. 

erse, Jan 
.!' nsen. -1618 
Jensen, Henrlk 
Jensen, -1733 
Jensen, -18 
Jensen, Iver 
Jepson, Axel 

leis.h. W. 

Johansen. -1421 
Johansen. -1705 



Anderson, Knut 
Anderson, -1229 
Anderson, Emil 

Anderson, Ernest 

Anderson, Simon 10. 
Anderson, Henry 
Anderson, Werner 
Anderson, Andrew N. 
Anderson, -1447 
A ni lei son, F. A. 
Anderson. -138 
Anderson. -1026 
Anderson, -HO'.i 
Anderason, 10. F. 
Arbanen, V. E 
Axelsson, C. B. 

Bogdon, Wm. 
Bono, Viktor 

Borgersen, Alf 
Borresen, Niels 
Boss, L. A. 
1 •ostrom. -643 

Boylan, Chr. J. 
Brandt, Gus 

Hruin, Wm. 
Bray, J. K. 
Rredesen, Johan 
Bregler, Fritz 
Breivik, L. O. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Unix. Henrlk 
Burdick, Chas. 
I airkharil. Geo. 
Burmeister, S. 
Burns, F. B. 
1 •.uttler, Viktor 
Byl, Jacob 

Hjalmar 
Chrlstensen M. H. 

Cliristensen H. P. 
( 'hristensen, N. F. 
Christiansen, Ferd. 
Clarke, R. 

I'iaus. J. R. C. 

Clements, Ole 
Connor, -817 
Cook, Harry 

Cougher, Alex 
Curran. W. 
Curry. L. D. 
Dixon. John 
Donovan, L. 
Howling, S. G. 
I aimer. Otto 
I Minn, C. W. 
I >unne, Joseph 

Ellingsen, Fred 
Elliott, John 
Ellsen, Fred 
Elueff, Robt. II. 
Emblem, O. 
Kngiund. R. 
Erlksen, E. R. 
Eriksen. Edward 
lOsnault, Geo. 

Forstrom, Sivert 
Foyn, Sam 
Frederiksen, -532 
Freiberg, P. 
Fridlund, John 
Froberg, Fred 
Frose, Elias 
Frost, Hans 
Furlong, Wm. 
Gronros, Viktor 
i Irosman, R. 
Grunberg, Tom 

Gnndersen; John 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gundersen, L. S. 
Gunnarsaon, Geo. 
Qustavson, Robert 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Guthre, Raymond 

Hawkins, M. 
Hedlund, -1726 
Hedlund. C. W. 
Heesche, Helnrich 

Ifei.ke, Paul 
I lel.niiler. II. 
Hellesto, lOmii 
i [elmroa, < ;. 
Helstrom, Chas. 
Helmer, Fritz 
Henhusen, Peter 
lionge, Arthur 

I lenrii hsen, K. H. 
Henrikson, A. G. 
Henrikson, Peter 
Hermann, Helge 
Hermansen, I.. 
Hermanssen, -1622 
inn. Gus. 

II inner. Paul 
Hirst, (i. 
Hjortli, Knud 
Holm, T. W. 
llolste, Willy 
Holatein, R. 

1 1 urn berg. G. P. 
Hotlng, n. 
Howell, Alb. s. 
Hover, J. 

Huft house, K. J. L. 
Hull. Hendrik 
Husby, [..us 
Isberg. E. G. 

Johanaen, -1656 
Johansen, 1677 
Johansen, 
Johansen, -1821 
Johansen, Emil 
Johanson, 10. R. 
Johanson, Fred 
Johanson, Edw. 

Johanson, Oscar 
Johanson, i ' 
Johanson, -1334 
Johannesen, -1441 
Johansson, K II 
Johnson, r . P. K. 

Johnsen, -1343 

en, -1800 
Johnsen, Andreas 

en, 1 1 j.i Ini.ir 
Johnson. 1300 
Johnson, -1283 



Johnson, Ivar 
Johnson, -ls::i 
Johnson, John A. 
Johnson, Blnar 
Johnaen, C. H. 
on, -l I'd 
Johnson, A. a. 
Jordan, Gus. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jr.rgensen, Emanuel 

Kahlsen, -1198 

Kalnisehke, Otto 

Kane, Geo. 

K:ulsi ii, Konrad 

[Carlson, Nestoi 
Karlstrom, R. 
Kask, i: 
Keedel, ('has. 
Kimeral. II. 
Kirst, liana 
Klahn. Chas. 
Kin nsen. Karl 

Klemo, Alf. 

ow, Paul 
Klingenberg. John 

L.aakonen, J. V. 
Lagerhamm, P. 

Labs, John 
- Ill 
Laine. -1391 

I .an. 11. or:;. ('. W. 
l.'illK. Gus 

|ViSt, I l. 
ii. A. P. 

■■ I r A. 
i |9 
' arsen, - 1658 

ii. Anton 
I. nrseii. Karl Ghr 

Larsen, -1287 
Latachlng, Eval.l 
I.au. Gus 
Lauritsen, Geo. 
Laws, i 
Leino, Gust 
Leishman. J. T. 
Lemmel. Chas. 
Lerch, Paul 

I listen. J. 

I..) Ire, Marina 
i. It. J. 
1 ' n la, Walter 
Lewis, Geo 

Madsen, i".'.:: 

M HlSell. .1. G. 
MlLMlllSSen. JOl 

Mahal ng, w. 
Malmgren, Wm. 
Mi rilisson. A. 
Martin, C. S. 
Martens, Jules 
Martinson, D. 
Mathleaen, l.udv. 
Mathewa. -1740 
Mathiesen, T. I.. 
Mathlesen, Harry 
Mattson, Renhold 
McArthur, I.. 
McFadden, Wm. 
McFall, Fred [.. 
McGoldrlck, Jas. 
Naumann. Alf. 
Nelson, g. 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nelson. M. P. 
Nelson. -906 

Nelson, -641 
Nelson, Ole 

N'. sl.it. T. 

N< stor. Wilson 

Viiol.iysen. H. 
Niooln. Ii. 
Nielsen. A. C. 
Nielsen. -754 



N • Isen, 

Nielsen. 
Nielsen. 



^71 
-:i7:: 
g ■ge 



Oberg. -790 
Oedekoven. Franz 
Ohlsson. Dei i.l 
Ohman, Aug. 
Olsen, -511 
Olsen. Pet. 
i Msen. Ole. C. 
Ols.n. -542 

■ iis.it. Arne 
i lis. -n. -v'.i; 

(Hsen. -812 
olsen, Carl 
Olsen. -534 
Olsen. 



-966 

Olsen. Aksel 
Olsen, Albert 

Pankhurst, Thos. 

fa ul. Al.-x- 
.n, Elnar 
Paulsen, -920 
1'auson, Rudolph 
Payne, R. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, John 
Petersen, Jens O. 
Petersen, -920 
Pedersen, Alf. L. 
Pedersen, -1136 
Pedersen. Sofus F. 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pedersen, Laurlts 
Persson, H. W. 
Pestoff, Sav. 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen. -709 

Raahange, J. F. 

Kajala. Viktor 

Rantanen, W. 
Rask, Hjalmar 
Rasmussen, Hans P. 
Rasmussen, J. P. 
Rasmussen, Johan 
Kau. R. 

Raymond, M. L. 
Reese. -685 
Reilley. J. W. 
Relnhold. Ernst 
Reponen, Anton 
Richelsen, P. 

Sanders, Frank 
Sarten, Chris 

-. Roland 
Seanlon, Hugh 
Schelenz. Hans 
Schild, A. 
Schlump, J. 
Bchmalkuche, Fr. 
Schmidlen, J. 
Schmidt. II. 
Schmuhl. Wm. 
Scholz, -1888 
Schroder, Aug. 
Sehroeder. Fre<i 

Schuler, Ed. 
Schultz, Emil G. 



en, R. w. 
Jorgensen, Theo. 
Jorgensen, A. P. 
.lor.lt. -1737 
Juelsen, Ed. 
Juliusen, Jens 
Juliusen, Carl 

-I'll. Fled 

Jurgensen, Wm. 
Jury, Chaa. C. 

Knu.lsen. Osear 
Kofoed, Andreas 
Koop, J. F. O. 
Korneliusen. Ben 
Kosel. H. W. A. 
Knopf, Fritz 
Knudsen. RangoalA 
Krandsen, Niels 
Kreutzer, Karl 
Kristiansen. A. 
Kristophersen. Jacob 
K rags tad. E. 
Krohnert, Alb. 
Kullman, Karl 

Lewzey, Geo. 
I.iliostrnm, ' : 
I.. ii. I. Gus A. 
I.inde, O. B. 
I.inde. Pertel 
Llndebery, Ernst 
Lin.leman. O. F. 
l.indhal. Michael 
Llndholm, A. R. 
l.iinllii.ini. Erik 
Llndholm, -1274 
Llndkvist, A. I. 
landman. Artur 
Llndstrom, A. John 
I.. .hie, Martin 
1 .ofniaii. K 

Lokce, Miik 
Long. Harry 
Lorho, M. 

l.ul k, R. A. 

Taickman, Ewald 
Lund. J. W. 
Lundberg, K. J. 
i .undberg, Carry 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Lundberg, Jacob 
Lundgrcn, A. 
Luiulin. Anders 
Lungren. T,. 

McLean. John 
Mel, cod. John A. 

Meland, Ingvalt 
Melander, C. G. 

Melart. Rolf 
Melin. Einar 
Meyer. -1648 

Meyer, Paul 

Fred 
Meyer, Frank 

Mikkclsen. A. S. 
Mlkkelsen, E. C. C. 
Mikkclsen. Axel M. 
Milnnder, Karl 
Mills. Geo. 
Moe. John M. 
Motile. Otto 
Mulley, .las. 
Mullieh. Aug. 
Nielsen. Otto 
Nielsen. Fritz 

Nielsen, Sivert 

Nielsen. -717 
Nielsen, Henri 
Nielsen. Alf. 

Nllsen, io.ivin 

Nilsen. H. 
Nilson. Tolnn 
Nilsson. Carl 
Nord. Ben. 
Nonllof, S. 
Nordstrom. Emil 
Non-man. P. W. 

N I. erg Osear 

Olsen. ingval 
olsen, Olaf S. 
ols.n. -677 
Olson. Harold 
Olson. -597 
Olson. C. 
Olson. -:i7<! 
Olson, -562 
Olson, M. P. 
olsson. Alhln 
O'Neill, F. J. 
Orchard, S. n. 
Ortiz. John 
(isen. Aksel 
Oamundaen, R. 

Petersen, -851 

Peteraen, -1019 

Peteraen, -1036 

Petersen . -1164 

Peteraen, -1088 

Petersen, -1164 

Petersen, Jens 

Petersen, Carl G. 

Peterson, S. 

Peterson, Bertel 
i 'eterson, Axel 
Petachow, w. 

Pheiffer. M. 
Phillips, Wm. 
Pietschmann, Geo, 
I'ohlman, Hans 
Pontynen, -1054 
Porrler, S. J. 
Probst, R. 

Rie liter, -756 
Rlntzo. John 
Rolstad. Oscar E. 
Ron.., Victor 
Rosbeck, Gus 
Roseheek. Paul 
Roaengren, A. 
Roaengren. Frans 
Rosenbohn, O. 
Rottol. A. S. 
Rudberg. C. 
Kyi. erg, Sv.-rre 
Ryden, A. Oskar 



Bcotl Emil G. 

S.iion. Tom 
Selander, W. 
Sellen, 

Sexon, Chas. 
Shawl. W. M. 
Sikowskl. A. 
Simpson, Lewla C. 
Sjogren, -330 
.- i.w ertsen. Martin 
smith. John V. 
So.lerman, M. 
Sorensen, - 1 192 
Sorensen. -1822 
Soto, Pedro 
Stanislas, Jean 



Staachau, John 
Sten, Axel 
Stjernholm, Chas. 
Stremmel, Harry 

Strokark, Paul 
Suckow, Franz 
Sullivan, S. C. 
Sundhohn, Axel 
Sundberg, Conrad 
Sundqviat, Aug. 

Taylor, Jas. W. 

T.-igland, Knudt 
Tennant, Thomas 
Thompsen, Th. 

Thorman. II. 
Throndsen, Hans 
Thorne, Gus 
Thornton, Boyce 
Thorsen, Johan 

l : rsin, Kasper, 

Vejooda. Fr. 
Vesterman, F. 
Vidot, Wm. 
Vongehr, Ewald 

Wagner, Claude 
Wahlers. W. 
Wahlstedt. -778 
Wahlum, Gus. O. 

Wakely, R. E. 
Wallace, Geo. 
Walstrom, John 
Walzer. E. 
WaseniUB, S. 
de, Fritz 
Westerman. Ja<-ol> 
Weyer, Paul 
Wieehmann, Aug. 



Svansen, Andrew 
Sve.lstrup, E. 
Svensen, Anker 
Svensson, -1188 
Svensson, lvar 
Swanson, -1886 
Swanson, Chas. 
Bwensen, -1629 
Swensen, Otto 
Syversen, Ole 

'1 horsen, Torger 
Tollefaen, A. 
Tonneasen, -440 
Torkilaen, Marius 
Torvlg dial 
Freder, Eugene 
Tuomlnen, a. 
Turner. Willy 
Turner, Ted 



Vmi Galen, Last 
Von Veraen, E. 

Vu.-ic, V. 



Wikman. Peter 
Wlllmann, w. 
Wlllmann, Frana 
Wlllmann, Wm. 
Winkel, A. 
Wirtanen, C. J. 
Winslow, Jas. 
Woker, Herman 
Wold, S. 
Wold, Haakon 
Wren, Mr. 
Wurzbach, -941 

Wychgel, -970 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



AllilelSi.il. Slllll 
All.ertsell. F. 

Ahlquist, A. 

Armstrong. Fr. 
Anderson, g. 

\ iiilersen. W. 

Andersen, -1235 
Anflndsen, O. 

Bowman. ('. 

Battel, W. 
Bjurk, a. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Budendltah, G. 
Benson, ('. 

• r. 

1 anl.erg. P.. 
I lupon, J. 
I ahldorf. D. 
Easton, It. W. 

Kliason. E. 

Edelman, G. 
Flanning, K. 

Fox. 10. .1. 
Flathead. C. 
Guthrie. R. 
Gullacsen, H. 
G.ierun.l. B, 
Gismervid, C. J. 
Hansen. C. B. 
I -lolmstriiiii, Ch. 
Hawkins. M. 

Henrickson, M. 

Heart. Ch. 
Harbeck, Th. 

Hanson. (1. 

u. G. I j. 
Johannesen, II. 
Jsaaksen, G. 

losepllsen. F. 

Joransaon, P. J. 
rohnaon, -l i.'.l 
Klintbom. M. 
Knudsen. II.. -41!i 

Ketola, il 
King. J. A. 
Lundin. A. 
Lauritson, g. 

I.anij.o, N. 
I.undblad. E. 
Lunde. ( i. 
Ludlow. J. 
Maibohm, II. 
Mortensen, Win. 
Miller. J. 
Nystrom. E. 
Nordman. V. 
Nielsen, A. 
Nelson. -906 

nisen. i-;.. -r.i:. 

( Hsen. J. 

Prager, II. 
Poison, J. 
Pedersen, N. C. 
Porter. Ch. 
Palinroth, C. E. 
Roy, J. A. 
Svensen. B. 
Squires, J. 
Siinonsen. F. 
Smith. ('. 
'l urnqulst, E. 

Wikblad. Otto 
Wells, L. 



Aasprong, G. 
Andersen, A., -853 
Anderson, John 
Arnold, Er. 

Andersen, a., -inr.7 

Anderson. C. 
Almeida, J. C. 

Bartholomew. W. 
liran.ler. W. 

I..U.1. 10. 

Boe, D. 

I llttgereit. L. 
I eisillg. 10 

i at traeier, C. 
i a earn, Joe 

I « Groot, J. 

l-Jlliallllelsoll. A. 

laiekson. M. 

Flletls, J. 

Forstrom, O. 
Gasman, g. 

( lilllileisell. I i 

Goddard, M. 

Graugard. L. 

Haatand, .1. 

Hansen. Carl 

II lll.eliette J. 

Hervlg, J. 
Holten, o. J. 
Hicks. J. 

Johnson, Carl 
Jorgensen. J. P. 
Johansson. -1618 
.1. nsen. .1. M. 
.lansen. .1.. -155.". 

n. C. 
Kusn. P. 
K lover. H.. -463 

Lomqulst, O. 

Lundin, C, 
Llttorln, 10. 

Lehtnnen. \\'. 
Larsen. 10. A. 
I.arsn. K. J. 
Mulley. .1. 

MeUand, O. 

Nilsen. Ed. 
Nyman, A. 
Nystrom, R. 

( ilsson. Johan 

Peed, J. 

Perkins. I >. 

Pierson. A. 

l'asson. P. 

Kislaksen, O. 
Swanson, J. 
Svenason, S. 
Swanne. II. 
Schmidt, Fr. 
Thogersen, T. 

Willing. 11. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, Chas -907Lundgren, C., -1295 
Anderson. Axel Magnussen. Judgen 

Anderson, J, -1514 .Vattson, Emil 
Arnold, Ernest Melgall, M. 

1. ait. Is. Herman M.-Kenzie, Duncan 
Banthin, Julius Mulley, James 

Braun, William Nielsen. Jens 

Hrun. Mathiaa -1492Claen, Martin 
IOklund. S. W. -679 olsen. Sigvald O. 
Fridlund. John llasinussen. Akton 

Follis, Geo. Reay. S. A. 

Hank, Rheinhold Rehbetn, Ernest 
Jensen, Albert -1650Rolesham, Jens W. 
Johansen. H. -2126 Ro.iahn, Aksel 
Kalberg, William Kollo. R. 
Kristenaen, .1. -1209 Rosenvold. Isak 
La horde, Joseph Schade, Wenzel 



Lang. Gust. 
Lonneker, Aug. 
Lowe, John A. 
Lubke, Jolin Von 



Sniidt. Alfred 

mn, Charllo 
Zlnk, Chas. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

509 Golden Gate Ave., Cor. Polk. 
Phone Market 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Maritime Matter* and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



SULLIVAN'S SHOES 



(Established 30 years.) 




Union 

Made and 

Strong 



MARKET STREET near 8th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Sur- 
plus ? 2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in 
cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 38,156,931.28 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



DON'T WAIT FOR YOUR SHIP 
TO COME IN, 

But Begin Now to Save. 

$2.00 is enough to start with, then 
every opportunity, deposit your spare 
change. 

Your account will grow rapidly and 
you will be encouraged — ere you know 
it you will have a snug sum laid by. 

You will not only have what you 
save, but we will make what you save 
earn 3y 2 %, compounded semi-annual- 

ly. 

We are open Saturday evenings. 

The Market Street Bank 

Market and Seventh Sts. 

Open Saturday afternoons and 
evenings. 

Safe deposit boxes $2.50 a year and up. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411, San Francisco| 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

JOHN RBGNIER 

EXPRESSING 

Stand, 44-46 East Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST, 
CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



CAPT. CHRISTEINSEIN 

( POLORES 

Inventor of CHRISTENSEN'S 4 SOLAR AZIMUTH COMPASS 

( DISTANCE FINDER 
Has opened a School of Navigation at 82 MARKET STREET, ROOM 22, 
where practical navigation for passing U. S. examinations for steam and sail 
will be taught. 

Terms on application. 




CHARLES LYONS of London 



IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

SUITS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

OVERCOATS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

TROUSERS TO ORDER FROM $5.00 UP 



1432 FILLMORE ST. 
731 VAN NESS AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



958 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

£. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Room 3 



J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters 
Boss of the Road and Can't Bust 'Em Overalls, 75 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR WALK OVER SHOES 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Between King and Berry Streets, San Francisco. 

GENTS', BOYS', AND YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



All the Leading Brands 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 
/. S. U. of A. Button* For Sale 

GUS. HOLMGREN 

154 EAST ST. San FranctMco 



Domestic and Naval. 



The new Hamburg-American liner 
President Grant, sister-ship of the 
President Lincoln, started on her 
maiden voyage from Hamburg to New 
York on September 14. 

Rear-Admiral John G. Walker, Unit- 
ed States Navy, retired, died at York 
Beach, Me., on September 15. Ad- 
miral Walker was 72 years of age and 
a native of New Hampshire. 

The Cunard liner Mauretania, sister- 
ship of the Lusitania, has completed 
her three-days' preliminary sea trial in 
the North Sea. It is understood that 
she developed capabilities in excess of 
what was anticipated. 

The General Director of the Chilean 
Navy has ordered the commander of 
the Talcahuano naval station to fur- 
nish any quantity of Welsh coal the 
American battleship fleet may require. 
The cost price of about forty shillings 
a ton will be charged. 

The members of the Newfoundland 
Government decline to comment upon 
the modus vivendi. The St. Johns 
Evening Telegram, a Government or- 
gan which has resisted a renewal of 
the agreement, declares that the in- 
terests of the colony have been sac- 
rificed. 

The four-masted schooner Victory, 
launched at Portland, Me., on Septem- 
ber 11 by the Casco Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, will be operated in the coast- 
wise lumber trade. The vessel is of 
700 tons gross and has a 170-foot keel. 
She will be commanded by Captain 
Blake. 

The large fleet of steam vessels en- 
gaged in transporting coal from Phila- 
delphia and other ports to New Eng- 
land will shortly be augmented by the 
collier Maiden, launched on Septem- 
ber 10 at Quincy, Mass., for the New 
England Coal and Coke Company, of 
Boston. 

For the first time in the history 
of the oil export trade a steamship 
not controlled by the Standard Oil 
Company sailed from Philadelphia, 
Pa., on September 6, with more than 
2,000,000 gallons of gas petroleum for 
Europe. The Sun Oil Company, an 
Independent concern, dispatched t'o 
Manchester its steamship Sun with 
2,079,000 gallons, valued at $80,000. 

Loaded with 5000 tons of coal, the 
six-masted schooner Mertie B. Crow- 
ley sailed from Greenwich, Pa., on 
September 5 on her first voyage. The 
Crowley is owned by the Coastwise 
Transportation Company, which con- 
trols a fleet of twelve large schooners. 
She carries, besides her officers, a 
crew of fourteen men. Her length 
is 382 feet, breadth, 48 feet, and depth, 
28 feet. 

The transatlantic record from 
Havre to New York, which has been 
held by the French liner La Provence 
for a year, was broken by that 
steamer on September 13, when she 
arrived at New York, having com- 
pleted the run across the long course 
of 3140 miles from Havre in six days, 
one hour, twelve minutes. The pre- 
vious record was six days, two hours, 
fifteen minutes. 

The new Cunard liner Lusitania ar- 
rived at New York on September 13 
on her maiden voyage with a new 
record of five days and fifty-four 
minutes between Queenstown and 
New York. This is six hours and 
twenty-nine minutes better than the 
best previous record. Her average 
speed was 23.01 knots per hour and 
the day's runs were five. Miles: 556, 
575, 570, 593 and 483 to the lightship, 
a total of 2782 miles. 



16 



>AST SEAMEN'S |( >URNAL. 



With the Wits. 



The Hat. — Smithkins — "I under- 
stand that you have pul all your prop 
erty in your wife's name." 

Biffkins — "Practically so; I've 
bought her a new hat." — Town Topics. 



Pi M>r 1 [enry. •" I tenry, di i [ loi ik 
like you when 1 have your hat on?" 
"I don't know, M'ria; why?" 
"I wore your hat (Hit in the 
today and mother told me it made 
k like a foi il." i fouston Post 



More Satisfactory. — Eastman "I 
understand your father owns a large 
ii in New Mexico. Does lu- run 
it on scientific principles?" 

Westlake — "No; he runs it on 
money-making principles." — Chii 
News. 



Nothing But tin- Truth. -Judge 
(contemptuously) — "Well, you are an 
nt specimen of manhood, I de- 
clare!" 

Mike (trying to he polite) "Shure, 
( )i am. yer honer; an' 'i Oi wasn't 
undher oath < li'd say ez much fer 
yure ilf." — Judge. 



Wanted Quick Relief.— Little Dim- 
pleton— "How '. • > 1 1 14- will it take you t«' 
me a working knowledge in 
jiu-jitsu?" 

The Professor — "Oh, say, two 
weeks." 

Little Dimpleton— "But, heavens, 
man! I can't wait all that time t 
hold uf our cook."- Philadelphia In 
quirer. 



Her Remedy. — He — "I understand 
have been attending an ambulance 

ela- v ( an y ,u tell me what is the 

best thing to do fur a broken heart?" 
Sin "1 iii, yes. Bind up the broken 
portion with a gold hand, bathe in 
ige blossom water, and apply 
plenty of raw rice. Guaranteed to lie 
well in a month !"— Judgi 



Tun Slippery. — "Billy ha- swal- 
lowed three plates nf ice cream to 
our one," whispered the freckled had 
at the Sunday-school picnic. 

"Leave it to me," chuckled his 
chum. I'll drop some ashes in de 
next plate." 

"Ashes? What good will iley do?" 

"Why. dey'll keep de ice cream 

fia mi slipping down so Fast." Chi 
cago New-. 




A $20 Suit 
for $15 



Every retail clothier, as you 
know, buys of the wholesalers 
or manufacturers except S. N. 
WOOD CS, CO. We are manu- 
facturers and sell direct to you. 

If you buy a suit here you may 
save that profit which the retailer 
is compelled to make. In short, 
you buy for the same price as any 
retail clothier pays. 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 



UPTOWN STORE 

Fillmore and Ellis Sts. 



DOWNTOWN STORE 

730 Market St. 



OAKLAND STORE 

Washington and 11th Sts. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 
THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS DEPOSITS 

Authorized Capital * 800, 

Paid-up Capital an. I Surplus 360,000 

Total Assets 2,200, 

Money forwarded t<> all parts of the world at lowest rates. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

' mas. NELSON, President. HENRY WILSON. 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President. ALBERT SUTTON. 

L,. M. Ma.l«)XAI.Ii, Cashier. MARTIN SANDERS, 

.1. C. ESCHEN. W. II. LITTLE. 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 
Tl it: 

United States Nautical College. 



:apt. j. g. hitchfield 



Principa 1 



oldest n ool ..ii ii..' 

Pacific Coast (established 187o l 
advantages thai ean nol be obtained 

U li.li'. 

i "n methods an- shoi I. thorough, con- 
cise an. i pracl ieal; the pi Ices are iu, !«i - 
ate, and you are assured of i 

Terms on Application. 
Sailors' Home. San Francisco 




D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 
AGENTS FOR 
STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 
UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 
HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 



Union Made 

Pants 
2.00 to 5.00 

With a guarantee of a new 
pair free if they don't wear 

Wallenstein & Frost 

VAN NESS AND GOLDEN GATE AVES. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



W. L. Douglas 

SHOES 

ALL STYLES AT THE 

Union Outfitting Co. 

Complete Men's Outfitters From 

Top to Bottom. 

26 EAST STREET 

BETWEEN MARKET AND MISSION. 




JAMES A. SORENSEN 
PBES. ANO TREAS. 



SOREINSEIN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

For lO Years 6th and Mission Sts. 



715 MARKET STREET, Near Third 
1255 FULTON STREET, Near Devisadero 
2593 MISSION STREET, Cor. 22nd Street 



THREE STORES: 

Phone Connections for all Stores 



FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 
LUNDSTROM HATS No. 4 MISSION ST., near East, SAIN FRANCISCO 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

530 HAIGHT ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 
JOHNJ.BAGLEY&CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 

•JH ^o Issued by tncAulhiTntu ol the • -->- ag 
|T0BATOW0RMIl5,^fI|feK INTERNATIONAL I UINIOIN 

X^^^^^^&^Jf^SiA MADE 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



22K, 18K AND 14K WEDDING RINGS IN STOCK 



$100 

<>r more can be safely invested by 
placing monthly savings in small 
amounts so that they will bring 
nt urn-, individually and al 
low the 

Wage Earners 

of San Francisco to take part in 
supplying funds to rebuild the city. 

Pot particulars address: 

SAN FRANCISCO BOND and 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

30 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1889 

Temporary Address, No. 775 Twenty-Second Street. 
Via Key Route. OAKLAND, CAL. 

This well-known school will occupy modem apartments and be fitted 
with all modern nautical appliances, Watch this paper for a special notice 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. P. 



THE NATIONAL. 

WANTED— 150 nun to sleep in 
our new and clean beds; 25 and 50 
cents per night. 217 East street, 
between Washington and Jackson 
streets, San Francisco. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXI, No. 2. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1907. 


Whole No. 1042.. 



THE TWO JAPANS. 



THE glamor of the Japanese apparition is 
fading; the critics are beginning to inves- 
tigate, to explain and predict. A series of 
notable books, dealing with Asia, has just ap- 
peared, and from them we may understand a lit- 
tle clearer the extraordinary and menacing posi- 
tion upon our Northern threshold. The point 
emphasized again and again in these works is 
that there are two Japans. Hitherto we have 
been too preoccupied by the almost perfect Japa- 
nese military machine; but out of sight, behind 
that machine, we can divine the uncivilized Asi- 
atic. Watson's "The Future in Japan" does not 
deal with the old Japan of Hearn, all color and 
iridescence, "the Japan of cherry-groves trans- 
planted from Paradise." He shows us that Japan 
is not exceptional, that she, like all other States, 
lies within the range and operation of the laws 
that govern the action of the human mind in 
every age. He finds that Japan has to offer us 
no new conception of religion, no new philoso- 
phy, no new principle in politics, no new theory 
of progress, no new interpretation of life. But 
he makes clear to us an extraordinary achieve- 
ment — the creation of a modern State, not by a 
nation, but by a group of national leaders, who 
continue, to this day, in defiance of the constitu- 
tion bestowed by them, to control this movement. 
The revolution that made modern Japan is unique 
in that it began from the top: 

"The Japan of to-day is but an inchoate experi- 
ment — a new structure in process of erection upon 
the site of an old which has not been wholly re- 
moved." 

So we have the two Japans — the official and 
modern Japan, the Japan of the Japanese leaders; 
and the unofficial and traditional Japan, the Japan 
of the Japanese people. The one produced the 
Japanese fighting machine, the other inherited 
from their ancestors the utterly anachronistic in- 
dustrial and manufacturing machine. And be- 
tween the precocious leaders and the reactionary 
led there is a remarkable abyss. The leaders are 
honest diplomats; the led, "in their commercial 
methods, remain wedded to the tradition of con- 
cealment, device, art and maneuver." 

Watson doubts whether such a top-heavy revo- 
lution can inspire a nation of forty-eight millions 
to continue in the path of this effort: 

"In joining the 'march of progress' Japan is 
moving toward an era of perplexity which must 
conduct her into the very dilemmas that consti- 
tute the crisis of our own disjointed time. . . . 
Japan, in fact, to Europe is but a note in the 
great diapason of history; she is not that diapa- 
son, nor is she even a chord. ... If she offers 
Europe a lesson, it is a lesson which, in the very 
act of adopting European civilization, she is her- 
self unlearning — the lesson of simplicity, psychi- 
cal, intellectual, political." 

Yet the remarkable docility, almost servility, of 
the Japanese people may, for a time, span the 
abyss that yawns between the twentieth-century 
leaders and the fifteenth-century led. No people 
in any civilized State is further in the rear of 
its leaders; none is more easily controlled by 
them. In no other State is there this enormous 
gulf in education, thought, practice and efficiency. 
The Japanese General Staff has its own Arisaka 
field-gun and its own Shimose powder. Yet Japa- 
nese agriculture is served by ox-plows with 
wooden coulters; the grain is threshed by the 



hand-flail, and winnowed by throwing it up in 
the air. Despite the brilliant success of the Japa- 
nese fighting machine: 

"It is certain that the Japanese, as a nation, are 
as yet relatively inefficient in European indus- 
tries, and that even in the purely indigenous 
manufactures there are defects of organization, of 
morale, and of method which, were industrial 
competence or manufacturing capacity the sole 
measure of national power, would condemn Japan 
to quite a humble place among contemporary 
States." 

Thus we see that the Japanese navy is only in 
a limited sense typical of Japanese achievement. 
Compare that navy, for instance, with the shock- 
ingly mismanaged Japanese national railways, 
and Japan is one of the poorest of the States of 
the World: 

"The materiel of her industries — buildings, ma- 
chinery, equipment — is almost always meager, 
their organization and general economy defective, 
and the methods of employers and employed 
often primitive and wasteful." 

And only one-tenth of the area of Japan is cul- 
tivable, and the poorest classes can not afford to 
eat the "best quality" rice that they grow. They 
export it here and elsewhere, and buy inferior 
qualities from China, Korea and India. 

First, let us look at the war-machine. In his 
eminently readable "Truce in the East," Putnam 
Weale discloses the enormous expansion of her 
war strength that Japan, sheltered by the truce 
afforded her by the Anglo-Japanese alliance, has 
had the opportunity to carry out. That Japan rec- 
ognizes — as Russia recognizes — that the peace is 
merely a truce is apparent by her creation, in a 
time of peace, of what is practically a new army. 
During the term of the Alliance, the Japanese 
army will reach a mobilization strength of one 
million men, with reserves equaling a second mil- 
lion. In ten years' time her war-strength will be 
exceeded only by Russia, Germany and France. 
(Recent cables indicate that Japan's orders to 
Krupps for 12-inch guns are so enormous that 
work will be given at Krupps to thirty thousand 
additional men.) As to her navy, probably only 
the British navy could dispatch a superior battle- 
fleet to meet it. France, Germany, or the United 
States would have to employ their entire naval 
strength to meet Japan during the next few 
years. America, however, is going to "look-see." 

Meantime, what is Japan's inveterate antago- 
nist doing? Weale tells us that at the conclusion 
of the war Russia was still an unbeaten power— 
and the Japanese generals knew it. Russia had in 
the field at that moment 12,500 officers, 917,000 
men, 270,000 horses and 1600 guns; her forces, 
strongly entrenched, exceeded by a few thousands 
the massed Japanese armies. The White Man is 
difficult to convince. The loss of Port Arthur 
and Lower Manchuria has strengthened Russia 
enormously. She can never be surprised again. 
She is now practically impregnable in Central 
Manchuria, and, without any dangerous coast- 
line to protect, all her energies, enormously aided 
by the doubling of the Siberian line, can be de- 
voted to taking up the positions held by Linic- 
vitch at the time of the truce. Russia still holds 
three-quarters of Manchuria. And the great sys- 
tem of railways which she is projecting is com- 
pletely isolated from the life of the country 
through which the lines pass; these are simply 



war-channels for the quick conveyance of armies. 
And enormous forces have been distributed in 
the Pacific and Amur provinces, and in the Baikal 
territories, while colonization by ex-Russian sol- 
diers is being strenuously promoted: 

"Thus Russia will possess permanently in the 
Far East twice as many armed men as she ever 
had before the war; and if her colonizing plans 
are given effect too quickly, that strength may be 
quadrupled in less than ten years." 

But enough of the obvious mailed fist; let us 
examine the muscles behind it, the life-blood that 
sustains its menace. Japan, though it possesses 
a somewhat noisy parliament, has hardly a ves- 
tige of a popular constitution. The voters num- 
ber less than a million in forty-eight millions. 
Japan is governed by its informal council of Elder 
Statesmen, responsible not to the people, but to 
their Emperor, who proceed on their way quite 
unmoved by the fact that the Parliament is 
against them. The Japanese M. P., who, since 
the Alliance, is apt to ask rude questions about 
the efficiency of the British army— about which, 
of course, he has every treaty right to be con- 
cerned — has little importance as a party man, be- 
cause party government is not in force, and he 
has little dignity as a representative of public 
opinion, because there is no educated public opin- 
ion in the country. The House of Representa- 
tives in 1903 carried a unanimous vote of cen- 
sure against the Government in its policy with 
Russia — and was promptly dissolved; and Weale 
details the ugly riots of the mob that demoralized 
Tokio for two days at the announcement of the 
peace terms. Count Okuma admits that Japan's 
"mental and moral education has not kept pace 
with her material progress"; and Baron Iwasaki 
apologizes: 

"It must, unfortunately, be admitted that the 
good moral tone of old Japan has altogether dis- 
appeared, and what we have lost in the process of 
transition we have not yet succeeded in replacing 
by the moral tone of European countries." 

And Watson cites one of the various public 
scandals as a proof "that Japan is almost in a 
class by herself in point of administrative venal- 
ity." From the published utterances of Japanese, 
Watson is confirmed in his opinion: 

"That subordinate sections of the administra- 
tive class are often venal, the political class un- 
usually corrupt, and the commercial class com- 
monly given to indirect and evasive methods and 
practices." 

Japan's efficiency in war has been purchased at 
the cost of chaos in her moral ideas and disorder 
in her political system. Douglas Story, whose 
book is rather a journalist's impressions than an 
historian's analysis, aptly remarks with reference 
to the truism that Japanese commercial morality 
is lax, that the Japanese Government is itself a 
partner in every great concern in the country: 

"It is impossible to discover where the Govern- 
ment interest begins and where the private con- 
trol ends in such great enterprises as those of 
the Mitsuis, the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the rail- 
way companies, and the mining ventures in Man- 
churia and Korea." 

If Japan must go the way of empire, she must 
conquer or find colonial territories. So far we 
have two colonizing or administering experi- 
ments, Formosa and Korea. The case of the 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CONVENTION CALL. 



American Federation of Labor, Head- 
quarters, 423-425 G Street N. W.. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

September 18, 1907. 

To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: 
You are hereby advised that, in pursuance 
to the Constitution of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the Twenty-seventh Annual 
Convention of the American Federation of 
Labor will be held at Norfolk, Virginia, be- 
ginning ten o'clock Monday morning, 
November 11, 1907, and will continue in ses- 
sion from day to day until the business of 
the convention has been completed. The 
first day's (Monday) session will be held at 
the Auditorium Building on the grounds of 
the Jamestown Exposition. All sessions 
thereafter will be held at the Armory Hall, 
in the city of Norfolk proper. 
Representation. 

Representation in the convention will be 
on the following basis: From National or 
International Unions, for less than 4000 
members, one delegate ; 4000 or more, two 
delegates; 8000 or more, three delegates; 
16,000 or more, four delegates; 32,000 or 
more, five delegates ; 64,000 or more, six 
delegates ; 128,000 or more, seven delegates, 
and so on ; and from Central bodies and 
State federations, and from local trade- 
unions not having a National or Interna- 
tional Union, and from Federal Labor 
Unions, one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to representa- 
tion, must have obtained a certificate of 
affiliation (charter) at least one month prior 
to the convention; and no person will be 
recognized as a delegate who is not a mem- 
ber in good standing of the organization he 
is elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wage workers, who are not 
members of, or eligible to membership in 
other trade-unions, are eligible as delegates 
from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor immediately 
after election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
convention unless the tax of their organi- 
zations has been paid in full to September 
30, 1907. 

The importance of our organizations and 
our movement, the duty of the hour and for 
the future, demand that every organization 
entitled to representation shall send its full 
quota of delegates to the Norfolk conven- 
tion, November 11, 1907. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 
in selecting your delegates. Be fully repre- 
sented. 

Be ably represented by your best, most 
faithful, and experienced members. 

Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original credentials 
must be given to the delegate-elect and the 
duplicate forwarded to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor office, 423-425 G Street North- 
west, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor six days previous to the open- 
ing of the convention, and will report im- 
mediately upon the opening thereof at Nor- 
folk ; hence Secretaries will observe the ne- 
cessity of mailing the duplicate credentials 



of their respective delegates at the earliest 
possible moment to Washington, D. C. 

Grievances. 
Under the law no grievance can be con- 
sidered by the convention that has been de- 
cided by a previous convention, except upon 
the recommendation of the Executive Coun- 
cil, nor will any grievance be considered 
where the parties thereto have not pre- 
viously held conference and attempted to 
adjust the same themselves. 

Railroad Rates. 

Application was made to the railroads to 
grant delegates and friends attending the 
Norfolk convention of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor a reduced fare. The railroad 
companies replied that the rates conceded 
visitors to the Jamestown Exposition at 
Norfolk, Virginia, can not be further re- 
duced. Hence delgates and their friends at- 
tending the American Federation of Labor 
convention can avail themselves of the ex- 
position excursion rates when making their 
purchases from their local ticket agents. 

Hotel Rates — (Rooms Only). 

Fairfax, $1.50 per day, two in room, ca- 
pacity 300; Lynnhaven, $1.50 per day, capac- 
ity 250; Princess, $1.50 per day, capacity 50; 
Atlantic, $1.50 per day, capacity 200; Neddo, 
$1.50 per day, capacity 200; Meyer, $1.00 per 
day, capacity 150; Henry Seelingers, $1.00 
per day, capacity 20; Colonial, $1.00 per 
day, capacity 150; Terminal Hotel and Cafe 
Co., 75c per day, capacity 50; New Glad- 
stone, $1.00 per day, capacity 250; Savoy, 
$1.50 per day, capacity 100; Lennox, $2.00 
per day, $3.00 per week per person, 2 in 
room, capacity 410. 

Rate for rooms with private families, $1.00 
per day for each person, for room and break- 
fast. Delegates wishing to make arrange- 
ments for themselves and families may do so 
by corresponding with W. H. Scott, 71 City 
Hall avenue, Norfolk, Va. 

Headquarters of the Executive Council 
will be at the Fairfax Hotel. 

Delegates should notify chairman of the 
Arrangements Committee, H. S. Scott, 71 
City Hall avenue, Norfolk, Va., stating time 
of their contemplated arrival at Norfolk, and 
over which road they will travel. 

If there be any further information regard- 
ing the convention, or the arangements for 
the convenience of the delegates, it will be 
communicated in a later circular, or through 
the American Federationist. 

Samuel Gompers, President. 

Attest: Frank Morrison, Secretary; 
James Duncan, First Vice-President; John 
Mitchell, Second Vice-President; James 
O'Connell, Third Vice-President ; Max Mor- 
ris, Fourth Vice-President; D. A. Hayes, 
Fifth Vice-President ; Daniel J. Keefe, Sixth 
Vice-President; Wm. D. Huber, Seventh 
Vice-President ; Jos. F. Valentine, Eighth 
Vice-President; John B. Lennon, Treasurer; 
Executive Council American Federation of 
Labor. 

Secretaries will please read this call at 
first meeting of their organization. Labor 
and reform press please copy. 



WASHINGTON LABOR SPEAKS. 



A new $1,000,000 distillery is to be con- 
structed at Winnipeg to meet the demands of 
the growing market of the Canadian North- 
west. The buildings will cover thirty-five 
acres, 200 men will be employed/and 500,000 
to 600,000 bushels of grain will be consumed 
annually. 



The following resolutions were adopted 
on September 9 by the Central Labor Union 
of the District of Columbia and vicinity and 
submitted to the labor press for publication: 

Whereas, The Constitution of the United 
States, section 8, Article I, has empowered 
Congress with authority to regulate com- 
merce with foreign nations and among the 
several States; and 

Whereas, The Constitution, section 8, 
Article I, has further empowered Congress 
to establish post-offices and post roads ; and 

Whereas, the present system of teleg- 
raphy is but a modern development of the 
postoffice, and it has been decided by the 
Supreme Court of the United States that 
telegraph companies are engaged in inter- 
state commerce; therefore be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of the Cen- 
tral Labor Union of the District of Colum- 
bia that the greed and avarice of the tele- 
graph companies of the United States are 
the immediate cause of the present unfortu- 
nate strike of the telegraph operators, which 
interferes with the dispatch of public and 
private business and social correspondence ; 
and as it is the desire of this body to strike 
at the root of the evil, be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the President of the United 
States, requesting him to declare in favor of 
Government ownership of the telegraph, 
and to urge upon Congress the importance 
and necessity for the same, in order to avoid 
a repetition of the present troubles in this 
regard. 

Whereas Charles A. Stillings, United 
States Public Printer, has violated the Eight 
Hour law, is an advocate of the "Open Shop" 
policy, and has been active in promoting the 
same, and as his attitude in this respect is a 
blow aimed at the cause of trade-unionism, 
with the avowed purpose of overthrowing it, 
thereby humiliating its members; and 

Whereas, The said Charles A. Stillings has 
reduced the wages of many faithful and 
competent public servants under his charge, 
and increased the salaries of already well- 
paid officials, including himself; and 

Whereas, He has sought to disrupt labor 
unions in general and the Bookbinders' 
Union in particular, by dismissing from pub- 
lic service some of its most earnest and 
hardworking officers, and all for the pur- 
pose of intimidating them as members of 
their Union and humiliating them in the 
eyes of the public, which conduct brands 
him as an enemy of union labor; therefore 
be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of the Cen- 
tral Labor Union of the District of Colum- 
bia, assembled, on the 9th day of Septem- 
ber, 1907, that the said Charles A. Stillings 
is a pronounced enemy of organized labor 
and has used his high office as a weapon to 
annoy and oppress its members, and destroy 
unionism itself; therefore be it further 

Resolved, That we request the President 
of the United States to remove the said 
Charles A. Stillings from the office of Pub- 
lic Printer by reason of his lawlessness, in- 
efficiency, injustice and hostility to organ- 
ized labor and its members, and that a copy 
of these resolutions be sent to the President 
of the United States, requesting his removal 
forthwith. 



Demand the union label on all products ! 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions) 




COMPULSORY EDUCATION. 



In a recent debate in the Belgian Cham- 
ber, the following interesting statistics were 
cited concerning the proportion of illiterates 
in countries where education is compulsory: 

In Italy and France the application of the 
law with regard to compulsory education is 
so disregarded that Rome, with a population 
of 507,000 inhabitants, has only 30,000 pu- 
pils in her primary schools, whereas she 
should send 70,000. About 20,000 of the 
pupils attend the public schools. In Paris, 
out of 225,000 children to whom the law 
should be applicable, 20,000 receive no in- 
struction. This state of affairs led to the 
recent introduction of a motion in the 
French Chamber to fine parents who evade 
the law. It appears to be the practice in 
many French communities to "inscribe" 
children who are withdrawn from their 
classes to work in factory or field. 

Prussia is cited as enforcing the law for 
compulsory instruction. In Norway, Swe- 
den, Denmark, and Switzerland all soldiers 
are said to know how to read and write, and 
in England illiteracy is decreasing. The 
law in Holland has been in force only since 
1901 and Amsterdam shows the following 
increase in the percentage of children at- 
tending school : In 1898, 36 per cent of the 
population; in 1900, 44 per cent; in 1901, 
70 per cent. The compulsory law brought 
about a quick increase of 24 per cent. 

In the argument in the Chamber for the 
adoption of a law for compulsory instruc- 
tion in Belgium, the statistics of 1904 bear- 
ing on instruction of military recruits were 
cited as follows: 17.52 per cent of almost 
absolutely ignorant recruits; 11.44 per cent 
only had excellent primary instruction, 
while 71.02 per cent had only the most ele- 
mentary schooling. The following figures 
were also cited concerning the proportion 
of illiteracy in two groups examined in 
1906, of 100 men each : The first group had 
30 completely illiterate, 24 able to write 
their names, and 46 able to read, write, and 
calculate. The second group had 19 com- 
pletely illiterate, 21 able to write their 
names, and 60 able to read, write and cal- 
culate. In the first group of young men 54 
per cent were absolutely without education, 
and in the second 40 per cent. The school 
reports between the years 1899 and 1902 
were quoted to prove that only 14.65 per 
cent of Belgian children received complete 
primary instruction, a large per cent leav- 
ing school with only rudimentary knowl-. 
edge. The conclusion reached was that the 
number of children figuring in the scholar 
lists was no proof of the education of the 
masses, but rather of the sterility of a non- 
compulsory school system. 



There is every evidence of very prosperous 
conditions prevailing in Australia at the pres- 
ent time. The deposits in the banks of the 
Commonwealth increased last year from $508,- 
983,599 to $541,289,076, or by nearly $32,500,- 
000. This increase is exclusive of the savings 
bank of the State of Victoria, the depositors in 
which number 486,018, with over $58,000,000 
to their credit, showing an increase of over 
$5,000,000. 



CHINESE EMIGRATION. 



It is reported from Vladivostok that dur- 
ing the year 1906 a strong tide of Chinese 
immigration from Shantung has been one 
of the great features. It is estimated that 
at least 40,000 have arrived at that city from 
Tsingtau and Chefoo. Vladivostok is now 
said to have the appearance of a semi-Chi- 
nese town. The Governor of Kiaochow has 
been greatly handicapped in securing work- 
men for the various governmental improve- 
ments, owing to the increase of emigration, 
notwithstanding the fact wages are from 
100 to 200 per cent higher than in the Shan- 
tung hinterland. There is a call now for 
laborers on the road and in the forestry de- 
partment, and the Governor states that he 
could use four times as many laborers as 
he is able to secure. 

The higher wages paid in Siberia and in 
the Amur provinces seem to be attracting 
the Chinese, and travelers on the Trans-Si- 
berian Railway say that men from this prov- 
ince are seen continually at every station of 
the railway as far inland as Irkutsk, being 
engaged as truck and fruit farmers and com- 
ing to the train to dispose of their produce 
to passengers. Much of the money made by 
these people is remitted to their relations in 
Shantung, and as it is a custom with Chi- 
nese never to write home without forward- 
ing some gift, and the postal money order 
system now furnishes a safe and easy means 
of transferring money, undoubtedly consid- 
erable amounts are being gradually trans- 
ported to the colony and the Province of 
Shantung from Manchurian and Siberian 
points. 

An increase of 40,000 in one year to the 
Chinese population of Vladivostok alone, 
coming entirely from the Province of Shan- 
tung, shows that there must be some par- 
ticularly attractive business there to interest 
the exceedingly keen business men of that 
territory. 



FACTS WORTH KNOWING. 



To prospective purchasers of pianos, or- 
gans or other musical instruments the fol- 
lowing facts, gleaned from the officials of 
the Piano, Organ and Musical Workers' In- 
ternational Union of America, may prove of 
great value. 

1. All union-made pianos, organs and 
musical instruments bear the label of the 
Piano, Organ and Musical Instrument 
Workers' International Union. 

2. Dealers representing instruments 
minus the union label as union-made are 
seeking to deceive. 

3. Any responsible dealer no matter 
where located, can secure union-label instru- 
ments. 

4. The label of the Piano, Organ and 
Musical Instrument Workers' Union is 
granted free of charge to all manufacturers 
operating union factories. 

5. Union label instruments are guaran- 
teed by the organization to be superior to 
those not bearing the label. 

The officials assure us that any additional 
information desired will be cheerfully fur- 
nished upon application, address 40 Semi- 
nary avenue, Chicago, 111. 



ALCOHOLISM IN FRANCE. 



France enjoys the reputation of a tem- 
perate country. It has often been cited as 
an example in favor of Jefferson's general- 
ization : "No nation is drunken where wine 
is cheap, and none is sober where the dear- 
ness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the 
common beverage of the people." As 
against Spain, and even as against Italy, 
France enjoys the further advantage that 
her wines are of less alcoholic strength than 
theirs. 

Recent investigations, however, indicate 
that France is losing absolutely, if not rela- 
tively, its enviable reputation for sobriety 
and is increasingly taking to "ardent spir- 
its." It seems that the cities of the north 
are those in which the demand for strong 
drink is greatest. Rouen, Caen, Cherbourg, 
Boulogne lead the list. The consumption 
of absolute alcohol in them varies from 10 
to 13 liters a year a head. But the Midi 
itself, the winegrowing district, is by no 
means exempt. While Paris in 1904 con- 
sumed 123,521 hectoliters of spirits, little 
Toulon took 5519. At Marseilles, to a con- 
sumption of 951,831 hectoliters of wine was 
added, in 1906, that of 46,000 of beer and 
23,000 of "alcohols." These latter consist 
largely of absinthe, doubtless one of' the 
most pernicious of spirituous liquors of 
which no fewer than nine varieties are 
recognized and classified. The municipality 
of Marseilles has made several effc ! 
close the bars in which the sale of spirits 
is the chief industry. But these havi thus 
far proved futile. At any rate, it is clear 
that Jefferson's saying is not without its 
exceptions even in a region where wine is 
so cheap that the cheapness of it has just 
given rise to a huge, widespread and dan- 
gerous revolt among the winegrowers. — 
New York Times. 



According to statistics recently published 
with regard to primary education in the Bra- 
zilian State of Minas Geraes by Dr. Carvalho 
Britto, Secretary of the Interior, it appears 
that this year the number of matriculations 
in the schools has doubled and is now about 
100,000, whereas in previous years it has never 
touched 50,000. This great increase is said by 
the Brazilian Review to be due to the prudent 
laws which reformed education in the State 
and adopted methods generally in vogue in 
other countries. It is expected that in a short 
time public instruction in Minas Geraes will 
have reached a very high level. 



Work upon the development and extension 
of the Trans-Brazilian Railway, formerly 
known as the Sao Paulo and Rio Grande Rail- 
way, which has been purchased by Canadian 
and American interests at a cost of £1,000,000 
($4,860,000) cash and the assumption of 
£3, 500,000 indebtedness, is being pushed under 
the direction of John Egan, constructor of 
many railroads in the western portion of the 
United States. The building of the portions 
of the great north and south system of Brazil, 
now planned, represents American capital, 
American materials and equipment, and an 
American railroad system generally. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Home News. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



It is reported that William J. Bryan 
will Shortly announce himself as a can- 
didate for the Democratic Presidential 
nomination. 

President Roosevelt has announced 
mat he will approve the Oklahoma 
Constitution, notwithstanding his per- 
sonal opinion of the document is "not 
tit for publication." 

The Grand Jury at Jackson, Miss,, 
has reported true bills against every 
railroad in the State for their alleged 
failure to file statements showing the 
number of passes issued and to whom, 
as the law directs. 

Warrants for the arrest of fourteen 
persons involved in the Pennsylvania 
State Capitol scandal were issued on 
September 18 by two Harrisburg Al- 
dermen on information furnished by 
Attorney-General Dodd. 

Twenty-live excursionists returning 
from Canada met death and many 
more were injured on September 15 in 
a head-on collision on the Concord di- 
vision of the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road about four miles west of Canaan 
Station, Vt. 

Food Commissioner Johnson, of 
Nebraska, has ordered proceedings 
brought against the South Omaha 
packing-houses for alleged violation 
of the Pure-Food law. It is asserted 
that short weight is given in packages 
of ham and bacon. 

In eight years, from 1899 to 1906, 
inclusive, the Standard Oil Company 
earned profits of $490,315,934, or at 
the rate of more than $61,000,000 a 
year. It distributed to its share- 
holders in the same period $308,- 
359,543. 

The proposed new charter for Chi- 
cago, 111., authorized by the State Leg- 
islature at the last session, was defeat- 
ed at a special election held on Sep- 
tember 17 by a majority of over 62,- 
000. Little more than half of the reg- 
istered vote was cast. 

In the Federal Court at Omaha, 
Neb., on September 26, the injunction 
asked for by the Nebraska railroads 
to prevent the enforcement of the law 
reducing grain rates by the State Rail- 
way Commission was denied and the 
restraining order was dissolved. 

Dr. Munro, Chief Dominion Gov- 
ernment Immigration Inspector in 
Vancouver, B. C, announced on Sep- 
tember 25 that the Government had 
instructed him to allow no more Japa- 
nese to land in Vancouver unless they 
had passports made out directly to 
Canada. 

Fear of an epidemic of beri-beri, a 
disease with which twenty Japanese 
laborers of Alvo are afflicted, has 
prompted City Physician Slattery, of 
Lincoln, Neb., to order an inspection 
of the Orientals in that city, and he 
will endeavor to have it extended to 
the entire county. 

The returns of the election in Okla- 
homa show that the Constitution has 
been adopted by 3 to 1 ; that Prohibi- 
tion has carried by at least 30,000 and 
that the whole Democratic State 
ticket, headed by Charles N. Haskell 
of MusKogee, has been elected by a 
majority of more than 20,000. 

Brigadier-General Barry, command- 
ing the army of Cuban pacification, 
recommends in his annual report an 
increase in the pay of officers and en- 
listed men, the reorganization of the 
mobile army, and immediate increase 
of the infantry by twenty-four regi- 
ments, the increase of the term of en- 
listment from three to five years, and 
also the sale of beer and light wines in 
the post exchanges. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS. 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
1 "istilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



'^GISTEH^ 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cat. 
Dealers in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



BUY A LOT IN SAN PEDRO 

It will make you rich some day. 
Call on 

PECK & ANDERSON, 

Next door to the Postofflce. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer In 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street. 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



FRED SVENDSEN 
• ■»«■*> • 

UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, -906 Absolonsen, Ole M. 

Andersson, A. H. Andersen, Gustaf 
Askerlund, Daniel O. Aaqulst, Thorvald 
Anderson, S. Arnesen, Karl A. 

Andersson, Adolf Albertaen, Johannes 
Ardelean, J. Andersen, P. -858 



Andersson, -1229 Kamp, G. H. 

Antonsen, Marius Kulman, G. H. 
Anderson, -988 (Registered letter) 

Anderson, -897 Kristensen. Peter 

Anelsson, Karl B. Kennedy, J. 

Anderson, Charles Kishl. Hans 
Anderson, V. -1240 Karlson. Gustaf 

Andersen, -1305 Kcrmagoret. Anatel 

Anderson, Albin Kick, Albert 
Anderson, -1118 Llndow, E. 

Andersson, Patrick Lukkima, Mr. 

Brusbard, 1402 Lind, Gus A. 
Behrens, F. J. utter, Franz 

Bortrom, Wm. Lindholm, Nestor 

Bade, Alex. Luckman, Thorwald 
Benson, Ray Larsen, Alf. 

Bouton, Eugene Larsen, P. -1179 
Blom, Ch. A. -1166 Larsen, Eivind 
Bedford, Arthur l.ouis. Coadon 

Bundesen, Jens I.ouncke, A. -1321 
Brander, W. -138»Lewis, John 

Brag, John K. J.arsen, Axel 
Bee, Colin Lindholm, C. 

Bergersen, Alf. Lorentzen, Hilmer 

Benreu, John E. Lundstedt, C. 

Bjorkholm, G. A. Lindroos, Askar A. 

Bergstrom, Franti Laine, Frank 

Blom, Filip Le Goff, Sylvian 

Brussel, Edward Maack, Hans 

Bringager, A. H. Markman, H. 

Bprgh, Borge -Martinson, August 

Carlson, G. A. Martin, John B. 
Carlson, C. E. -903Malmberg. Robert 
Christiansen, LudvigMiller, James 

Christensen, M. Alahring W. 

Cohrt. Herman McDonald, N. 

Collberg, Chas. Maibohm, Hans 

Christoffersen, A. Munroe, H. G. 

Coccine, Louis McLeod 

Christiansen, -901 Mikkelsen, B. -1445 

Cooley, J. H. B. Mannitrom, W. 

Cone, Pierre Mattson. J . 

Carnaghan, Wm. Miller, James 

Cook, Harry Magel, Fred 

Carlson, Aksel Malmqvist, J. 

Christensen, Christ Martyn, Leroy 
Carlson, Waldemar Mi^mussen, Carl E. 

Chamberlin, L. C. Mikkelsen, Peter 
Christensen, Ludwig Monterus, John 

I'unielsen, Hans H. Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Damdani, Alesandro Nass, Paddy 

Dittmer, Otto ..ilson, Daniel 

Danlelaon, Gustav Niison, -737 

Dunwoodie, H. Nilsen, N. A. -888 

Dahlberg, J. Nilsen, N. A. -734 

Eiiasson, Edward Neilsen, George 

lakeland, Sigurd Nilsen, Peter 

Biggere, John Neerheim, Th. P. 

Edelhagen, P. F. Nordin. M. 

Ericson, Johan Neilsen, W. 

Folvig. J. A. Nystrom, Ragnar 
l'rioclrikson, Andrew Osterhais, R. 

Porstrom, Oskar Olsen, Guttorn 

Fernberg, Gustaf Olsen, N. 

Garder. Oscar Olsen, Olaf 



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COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The French bark Rochambeau, which was for 
some time on the overdue list, arrived at San 
Francisco on September 27. 

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's new 
steamer Governor was given a trial trip on San 
Francisco Bay on September 27, with a large 
party of invited guests on board. 

W. E. Pierce, San Francisco manager for 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, has re- 
signed his position, with the intention, it is said, 
of entering a new line of business. His succes- 
sor has not yet been appointed. 

The Norwegian steamer Tellus, coal laden, 
from Nanaimo, B. C, to Portland, Or., went 
ashore on North Spit at the entrance to Gray's 
Harbor on September 21. On the tollowing 
morning she broke in two and will be a total 
loss. 

The fishermen who were shipwrecked on the 
ship John Currier at Nelson Lagoon in the Arc- 
tic Ocean, and after being marooned there for 
thirty-four days were rescued by the revenue- 
cutter McCulloch, arrived at Astoria, Or., on 
September 26. 

The Board of Health of Monterey, Cal., has 
passed a resolution requiring all vessels arriving 
from San Francisco to show certificates from a 
United States Quarantine Officei stating that the 
Quarantine regulations have been complied with 
before being permitted to load or discharge cargo. 

The brigantine Galilee which is in the service 
of the Carnegie Institution expedition for the 
study and charting of magnetic variations in the 
Pacific Ocean recently went into dry dock at 
Honolulu, T. H., for an overhauling. She sailed 
on September 21 for a cruise in the South Pa- 
cific. 

Captain Jones of the gasoline schooner Delia 
has reported to the Branch Hydrographic office 
at Portland, Or., that he recently sighted a 
derelict, about three miles southwest of Cape 
Meares light. The derelict appeared to be about 
forty feet long, and stood about four feet out of 
the water. 

W. A. Coulter, the well-known marine artist, 
who has just returned from a lengthy trip to 
the South, has been engaged in making studies 
of the ship Aryan, lying at Howard street wharf, 
San Francisco, with a view to making a painting 
of tne last-built wooden vessel of her class to be 
launched in the United States. 

The overdue ship Jessomene, which left Wal- 
laroo, Australia, for Falmouth, over five months 
ago and which was on the overdue list, has 
been spoken. The Jessomene was 163 davs on 
her voyage and should have reached port at 
least one month ago. No news has been re- 
ceived as to the cause of her delav. 

Efforts are being renewed to secure the estab- 
lishment of a time-ball in Honolulu, T. H. At 
present and for many years the Territorial Sur- 
vey office has kept standard time corrected by 
daily observations, and this has been announced 
for the benefit of shipping by a whistle. But this 
method is not as accurate or satisfactory as a 
time-ball. 

A cablegram from Punta Arenas to London 
conveys the intelligence that the steamer A. J. 
Lindsay, bound from Baltimore to San Fran- 
cisco, arrived there on September 22 in a dis- 
abled condition. It has been ascertained that 
when some distance off the Straits of Magellan 
her crank pin was broken. With some difficulty 
the Lindsay was taken into Punta Arenas. 

The well-known schooner Vine, of San Fran- 
cisco, is likely to become a total wreck. The 
Vine, which left San Francisco on June 26 for 
Point Hope, was blown ashore during a gale at 
Deering, Kotzebue Sound, some time prior to 
September 21. At the time she had on board a 
large amount of freight for Kotzebue and 
Point Hope. 

The steam-schooner Scotia is to have a new 
stern. The Scotia, which is owned by Russell 
& Rogers, sustained serious damage when in 
collision with the British tramp steamer Cape 
Corso at Long Wharf, Oakland. A survey shows 
that her stern was badly injured in the collision. 
She will be placed in the Sixteenth-street drv 
dock and her repairs will be carried out by the 
Moore & Scott Iron Works. 

The dredger Monarch, of the North American 
Dredging Company, which has the contract for re- 
moving about 30.000 yards of sand from the 
outer bar at San Diego, Cal., arrived at that port 
on September IS, and will at once begin the work. 
Several years ago the Government cut a channel 
200 feet wide through the bar to a uniform depth 
of thirty feet at low water. The Monarch will 
go over this work and widen the cut to 275 feet 
and all of the same depth. 

A harrowing tale of starvation and ill treat- 
ment was told in the United States District 
Court at San Francisco on September 23 bv three 
seamen who went into the ice-bound Arctic on 
whaling vessels. The men were Frank Miller, 
George Johnson and Alfred Healey. Their testi- 
mony was given in a suit to recover wages and 
damages against George E. Plummer & Co., 
owners of the whalers Olga and Hanson. The 
hearing was postponed until November 18 in 



order to secure the attendance of Captain Mc- 
Kenna, of the Hanson. 

The most powerful light in the whole Light- 
house Service of the United States will be the 
one which will be put in service at Makapuu 
Point, on the Island of Oahu, and at a distance 
of about fifteen miles from Honolulu, T. H. A 
light at this point will protect vessels from the 
dangers that overtook the Manchuria a year ago 
and led her on the Walmanalo Reef. This light 
will be thrown out through a hyper-radiant lens, 
the original cost of which is $26,000. On a clear 
night it will be visible for over fifty miles at 
sea, and will pierce a moderate fog for a dis- 
tance of twenty miles. 

Two hundred and fifty-three thousand tons of 
coal, exclusive of that to be shipped in Govern- 
ment colliers, will be required to get the At- 
lantic battleship fleet to the Pacific Coast and 
properly coal it at San Francisco, according to 
the estimates made by the equipment bureau 
of the Navy Department, which has called for 
proposals for supplying the necessary fuel. Of 
this aggregate 133,000 tons are semi-bituminous 
and the remainder Welsh coal. The former is 
to be shipped from Atlantic ports in vessels 
either of American or foreign register, accord- 
ing to the terms. 

In an official communication to Captain Emil 
Franke, who was commander of the Great 
Northern liner DaKOta, wrecked on Kiukone 
Reef, coast of Japan, March 3 last. George Uhler, 
Supervising Inspector-General, Steamboat In- 
spection Service, severely censures him on ac- 
count of loss of the ship. Captain Franke's ap- 
peal from the findings of the local Inspectors at 
San Francisco, suspending him from command, 
was denied. After January 1, 1908, Captain 
Francke may be licensed as chief mate of ocean 
steamers and after having served two years as 
chief mate he may be again licensed as a master 
of ocean steamers. 

A final and successful effort to raise the 
Pacific Mail liner Acapulco, at San Francisco, 
was made on September 12. T. P. H. Whitelaw, 
the contractor who undertook the work, after 
having patched up the leaks in the sunken 
steamer, set the pumps in work again at 6 
o'clock in the morning. By 9 o'clock the gain 
made by the pumps on the water in the hold 
was distinctly noticeable and by about 10:30 
o'clock the the big hull began to rise out of the 
water. She was afloat shortly afterward. The 
Acalpulco is the 157th ship raised by T. P. H. 
Whitelaw. He states that owing to the age of 
the vessel the job has been the worst he has 
ever undertaken. 

Captain John Berrringham. Supervising In- 
spector of Steam Vessels at San Francisco, has 
exonorated the captain of the Santa Rosa, which 
grounded off Point Vincente early on the morn- 
ing of September 11. He sums up the affair in 
the following language: Captain Alexander 
testified that as master he has made more than 
800 round voyages between San Francisco and 
San Diego, about 750 of which were on the Santa 
Rosa, without a mishap in his navigation — a 
wonderful record of his skill previous to the voy- 
age under consideration. That mishap was not 
attended with serious results; possiblv it might 
have been averted bv a freer use of thj lead. 
Nevertheless, I do not believe I would be iustified 
in suspending his license for negligence or un- 
skillfulness in the matter of the grounding of the 
Santa Rosa. 

Following is the^reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on September 27: Shin Guiana, 
193 days from Mobile for Bahia Blanca. 90 per 
cent; ship Cresington, 164 days from Iquique for 
Falmouth, 6 per cent; Celtic Chief, 162 davs from 
Hamburg for Honolulu. 8 per cent; La Tour 
d'Auvergne, 118 days from Rochester for San 
Francisco, 8 per cent; Medea, 209 days from Stet- 
tin for San Francisco, 26 per cent; Rajore. 139 
days from London for San Francisco, 6 per cent; 
iimla, 157 davs from Port Pirie for Falmouth, 
21 per cent; Inverlyon, 141 days from Wallaroo 
for Falmouth, 6 per cent; Thomasina, 149 days 
from Port Pirie for Falmouth, 6 per cent; Had- 
don Hall, 147 days from Geelong for Falmouth, 
6 per cent; Craigisla, 113 days from Newcastle, 
Australia, for Mollendo, 10 per cent; Kenilworth, 
at Rio Janeiro for San Francisco, 11 per cent; 
Silberhorn, 107 days from Newcastle, Austra- 
lia, for Pisagua, 60 per cent; Louise, 109 days 
from Bremen for San Francisco. 11 per cent; 
Dumfrieshire, 170 days from Shields for Port 
Los Angeles, 8 per cent. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards, 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1V4A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches! 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



CLEVELAND, 
CHICAGO, 111., 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
, 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



\V. MACARTHUR, Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Mgr. 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months. ----- $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
44-46 Bast street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
pul lislied in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1907. 



CONGRESS AND EXCLUSION. 



Washington, D. C, September 21. — State De- 
partment officials have little courage for renew- 
ing efforts to secure a Japanese Exclusion treaty. 
A demand from California for some further ac- 
tion toward Exclusion is expected this winter. 
Reports have reached here that Representative 
Hayes is coming to Washington determined to 
stir the National House by the presentation and 
agitation of Exclusion bills. Those reports, 
however, are not causing much uneasiness. It 
is difficult for a single Congressman to create- 
much ruction in official Washington. Generally 
a statesman of that character can be called off 
by party leaders, after he has given a few intcr- 
views and deposited his bill with the desk clerk. 

If the entire California delegation however, 
should come demanding Exclusion and be ready 
to fight for it, with assurance of re-enforcements 
from the Oregon and Washington State delega- 
tions, the situation would be more serious. They 
could cause a lot of embarrassment in Senate and 
House. The Administration hears that there is 
no prospect of any such concerted demand. 
Whether the disturbances in Vancouver will en- 
courage the State Department to try once more 
t<> persuade the Japanese authorities to draw a 
new treaty with an Exclusion clause therein can 
not be stated yet. Secretary Root is not taking 
up any important work yet, and will not for sev- 
eral weeks, when he has returned from his visit 
to Mexico. 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor Straus has 
almost openly espoused the side of the opposi- 
tion to Exclusion. As a member of the Presi- 
dent's Cabinet his influence in that role will be 
considerable, for lie is claiming that considerable 
business interests on the Coast welcome the pres- 
ence of the Japanese. 

The foregoing, from the Washington corre- 
spondence of the Sacramento Bee, casts an 
interesting light upon the prospects of Exclu- 
sion legislation in the coming Congress. Rep- 
resentative Hayes will presumably push the 
bill introduced by him at a previous session, 
which measure proposes to extend the provi- 
sions of the Chinese Exclusion Act to all 
classes of Asiatics. The Hayes bill, it will be 
recalled, was by tacit consent permitted to lie 
in abeyance pending the result of the settle- 
ment (?) made by President Roosevelt and 
embodied in the Immigration Act. The ac- 
knowledged failure of the Root-Roosevelt set- 
tlement ( ?) leaves the way clear for a revival 
of the only plan that promises a real settle- 
ment of the issue, namely, the passage of a 
Japanese Exclusion bill. The failure of the 
attempt to compromise with the question has 
accomplished good in at least one respect ; it 
has demonstrated the fatuity of attempting to 
deal with a fundamental question by super- 
ficial means. 



Concerning the probable attitude of the 
California delegation to Congress, it may be 
taken for granted that the gentlemen will fall 
into line as soon as they have heard from 
"home." The difference between the activity 
of Representative Hayes and the comparative 
inactivity of his colleagues is due mainly to 
the differing degrees of activity in Exclusion 
sentiment in different parts of the State, not 
to any actual disagreement among the people 
upon the subject itself. Political considera- 
tions alone may be depended upon to stir the 
delegation to action. When we speak of "po- 
litical considerations" we refer to the fact that 
representatives generally are naturally dis- 
posed to defer to that sentiment which is 
backed by the largest number of votes, which 
is simply another way of saying that represen- 
tatives are disposed to act in accordance with 
the majority sentiment of their respective con- 
stituencies. Sooner or later, probably sooner, 
the entire California delegation, and indeed 
the entire Western delegation, will move upon 
Congress for the passage of legislation to pro- 
tect the West from the East — that is, from the 
Orient. As the Bee's correspondent suggests. 
such a situation "would be more serious." 
Such a situation need cause no embarrassment 
in Congress, unless indeed Congress should de- 
termine to oppose the interests of the country. 
We hardly anticipate any difficulty upon that 
score. Congress is from Missouri ; when 
it is "shown," it will act. 

The pro-Japanese attitude of Secretary 
Straus need bother no one. Intellectually that 
gentleman speaks for the element that regards 
the question from the abstract standpoint of 
"human brotherhood" ; politically, he speaks 
for the element that regards the question from 
the "practical" standpoint of cheap labor. 
These elements, even when combined, do not 
constitute any considerable proportion of the 
people ; further, they are a rapidly diminish- 
ing quantity. In all human probability Secre- 
tary Straus himself will be found on the side 
of Exclusion within a year; otherwise, he is 
apt to be found standing absolutely alone in 
his pro-Japanese attitude. 



HELP THE TELEGRAPHERS! 



The appeal for financial aid issued by the 
Commercial Telegraphers' Union, and in- 
dorsed by the American Federation of Labor 
(see page 11), should meet with a prompt 
and generous response on the part of organ- 
ized labor throughout the country. Strenu- 
ous efforts have been made by the telegraph 
companies to obscure the issue between them- 
selves and their employes. The attempt to 
prejudice the case of the Telegraphers has 
failed in face of the notorious fact that the 
telegraph companies, constituting as they do 
a practical monopoly, have imposed upon their 
employes all the burdens and oppressions 
within the power of the strong to inflict upon 
the weak. The list of grievances related by 
the Telegraphers reads like a story from the 
age of barbarism. The fact that the condi- 
tions of overwork, underpay, espionage and 
other features of the Telegraphers' employ- 
ment should exist in an industry that stands 
pre-eminently characteristic of our "high civ- 
ilization" is at once consistent and inconsis- 
tent with civilization, high or low. It is con- 
sistent in that civilization is proverbially un- 
heeding of justice, and inconsistent in that the 
Telegraphers, although standing high among 
the activities of industrial life, are forced to 
submit to conditions that would be spurned 



by the humblest and most obscure workers in 
the industrial army. The explanation of this 
anomaly lies in the general condition of the 
telegraph industry — i. e., in the condition of 
monopoly. 

It is this condition of monopoly that the 
Telegraphers are contending against. Organ- 
ization among the Telegraphers is, of course, 
a necessity to successful resistance upon their 
part. The telegraph companies, knowing and 
fearing the power of organization, are deter- 
mined that that power, so useful to them- 
selves, shall not be brought to bear upon them 
by their employes. In a word, the Telegraph- 
ers are fighting for relief from the burdens im- 
posed upon them by the monopoly, while the 
latter is fighting to destroy the only power 
that can compel that relief, the Telegraphers' 
Union. It is an eminently just cause. The 
lines are clearly drawn. Organized labor 
should in duty to itself respond to the appeal 
of the Telegraphers in order that the Western 
Union and Postal Telegraph companies shall 
be forced to make honorable terms of settle- 
ment. 



STRIKERS SENT TO PRISON. 



According to a recent decision of the New 
Zealand Court of Appeals, strikers who violate 
the Arbitration Act may be sent to prison in the 
event of failure to pay fines assessed by the 
Court. Before this decision it was not possible 
to punish strikers, because rarely did they pos- 
sess property which could be seized in payment 
of fines. On the other hand, tines assessed 
against employers could be collected for the rea- 
son that levies could be made against their prop- 
erty. 

They have compulsory arbitration in New Zea- 
land. Opinions differ as to the benefits derived 
from the system by organized labor. Imprison- 
ment for striking may seem harsh treatment, but 
it must be remembered that imprisonment only 
follows failure to pay fines. And, so long as the 
Arbitration Act is in force, and the unionists ex- 
pect employers to be amenable to its terms, they 
must not object if they, too, are punished for vio- 
lating the Act. 

The workingmen of New Zealand are respon- 
sible for the passage of the Arbitration Act. 

Strikes in New Zealand are very rare, and of 
late there have been only two, the largest being 
at Wellington, when the Dtitchers struck at a 
time when there was heavy slaughtering of sheep 
for shipment to England. The butcners struck 
against the wage award of the Arbitration Court, 
and were fined for so doing. — New York Evening 
Journal. 

The foregoing overlooks one very impor- 
tant defect in the Compulsory Arbitration sys- 
tem. To say that because the New Zealand 
Act imposes fines upon employers, the work- 
ingmen must not object if they, too, "are pun- 
ished for violating the Act," is to ignore the 
radical difference, not only in degree but in 
kind, between the punishment inflicted upon 
employer and employe, respectively. Both 
employer and employe are subject to fine, but 
if the employe be in the nature of things un- 
able to pay the fine and must therefore go to 
jail, the practical effect of the law is that the 
employer is punishable by fine and the em- 
ploye by imprisonment. Undoubtedly, the 
workers have a right to object to any system 
which, however equitable in theory, works to 
their disadvantage in practice. 

After all, the objection here noted is a minor 
one. The important objection to compulsory 
arbitration rests upon fundamental ground, 
namely, that the liberty of the worker to work 
or quit is inalienable, as the basic element of 
all human liberty. The man who is forced to 
work against his will is a slave in all that the 
word implies. The manner in which that force 
is exercised, whether by fines or by imprison- 
ment, is immaterial. Compulsory arbitration 
is involuntary servitude, an anachronism, and 
therefore a failure. The only hope of success 
in that system lies in the possibility that some 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



day the revolution that is forever going on in 
society will change its course, and go back- 
ward. 



Much as we respect the Japanese, much as we 
detest the usual phenomena of racial and color 
prejudice, we are bound to say that in the last 
resort we can not wonder that the self-governing 
English-speaking communities of the Empire are 
determined to remain white men's countries, 
with all that that involves, and will not run the 
risk of letting the land they live in and the land 
they love be made the ground for an experiment 
which has never before been tried in history — 
the experiment of a community of mixed Euro- 
pean and Asiatic blood, founded on a mixture of 
the social, religious and moral ideals of the two 
continents. — London Spectator. 

These views are in themselves the strongest 
evidence of the irresistibility of the movement 
for Asiatic Exclusion. Much as the Spectator 
and other publications respect the Japanese, 
and much as they detest the "prejudice" that 
would exclude that race from the "white 
man's country," they are forced to acknowl- 
edge that "prejudice," in this instance, is sim- 
ply another name for human nature. "Racial 
and color prejudice" is but racial and color 
instinct, and as such it is bound to triumph 
over all obstacles and dangers. 



The call for the annual convention of the 
American Federation of Labor rightly lays 
stress upon the importance of choosing men 
of experience and ability as delegates to that 
body. Labor should be represented in the con- 
vention by its big men, not by its "good fel- 
lows." The convention isn't a smoker, a pic- 
nic nor a mass-meeting. 



Read "The Two Japans," in this issue. It 
contains a fund of information on many un- 
familiar aspects of the question. 



THE TWO JAPANS. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



Formosans, a semi-barbarous people, is claimed 
as a good example of Japan's administrative 
power. We will give Japan credit for Formosa. 
But Korea must be placed on the other side of 
the ledger. The Koreans have a hatred six hun- 
dred years old for the Japanese; and the manner 
in which the bayonet was pointed in order to ex- 
tort the signing away of Korea's independence — 
the preservation of which was the sole reason 
given to the world by Japan for entering the lists 
with Russia — can not help to diminish'that hatred. 
The Koreans and the Japanese do not intermarry; 
and the country — a poor State — is being ex- 
ploited by the conquerors in a way that will not 
conduce to friendly relations between the Ko- 
reans and their military masters. Putnam Weale 
shows that Japan has not the smaPest intention 
of "colonizing" Korea. His account of the post 
bellum happenings in that distressful country is 
well worth attention: 

"In Korea the limitations of the machine are 
startlingly manifested — limitations which are the 
result of the national characteristics rather than 
of any inherent defects in the machine itself." 

Douglas Story, too, devotes much attention to 
"the case of Korea." He publishes an autograph 
letter from the Emperor, obtained with exceed- 
ing difficulty, owing to Japanese espionage, in 
which that unhappy individual exposes the tac- 
tics by which that "treaty" was obtained. Wat- 
son inquires what capacity Japan has shown 
that she could govern an empire? "Her methods 
in Korea," he concludes, "do not seem promis- 
ing. 

There are three questions of the future in the 
answer of which Australia is vitally interested. 
These are: Which of the two Japans is to hold 
the balance of power within that country? What 
is to happen to the Anglo- Japanese Alliance? 
What is the logical end of the strangely stirring 
nationalism of Asia? 

As to the two Japans, Watson sees every in- 
dication of the old Japan, the uneducated medie- 
val populace, taking charge. Tn pre-modern 
times government was a universal despotism 
slavishly accepted; and the dissolution of this 
terribly rigid authority will be followed by a re- 
bound equal to the tremendous strain. In the 
day of its discredit, authority will be scorned 
and repudiated in proportion as it is accented in 
the fast-closing day of its infallibility. To-day 
the House of Representatives is. to an excessive 
degree, turbulent and truculent, and Japanese 
leaders, whose names are daily dragged in the 
mire by their own press, in every grave crisis 
may expect at least a threat of assassination. 



The Japanese people bear their leaders a grudge 
for having kept them in the dark for a millennium 
or so. It is only the inherited fiction of the 
sacro-sanctity of their Emperor which, according 
to Watson, prevents them from hanging their 
Emperor's statesmen. It is a dangerous thing, 
as Russia has found, to turn up the soil of minds 
that are still medieval. And the Japanese are 
destined some day to discover that their god- 
emperor is merely mortal. And what then? 

Meantime Japan is valiantly making the at- 
tempt to supply her industrial deficiencies. The 
import of a hundred European manufactures, 
ranging from matches to umbrellas, has been 
changed into a flourishing export. And there is 
actually talk of Factories Acts. The extent and 
strenuousness of that effort is indicated by Put- 
nam Weale: 

"With a powerful government gathering every- 
thing into its hands and assuming control of all 
the productive works; with a policy of entrench- 
ing being carried on night and day in Korea and 
Southern Manchuria; with a great army and a 
powerful navy rising as if by magic; with ship- 
ping subsidized and organized, and every industry 
and bank closely overseen; Avith every incentive 
being given to the Japanese people to fall in with 
this grand idea — Japan marches on her way, per- 
fectly secure for nine years, thanks to the Anglo- 
Japanese Alliance." 

Which brings us to our second interrogation. 
First, we must notice that the Alliance has been 
of almost incalculable value to Japan. Nay, it 
saved her from extinction. If England, Weale 
asserts, had refused to renew the Alliance on its 
present terms, Japan would have been forced to 
continue the war, or would have laid down arms 
only to be exposed to the danger of having to 
take them up again at a moment's notice. Eng- 
land has stepped in with a ten-years' truce, and 
Japan is not wasting a moment of her lucky 
breathing-space. The Portsmouth peace was 
really made in London. Each of these volumes 
under review brings an array of facts to support 
Weale's assertion that the progress of the war 
was arrested in a manner dangerous to tne future 
welfare of the British Empire. Story's conclu- 
sions are: 

"A doubt of the wisdom of alliance with an 
Oriental Power, an anticipation of racial animosi- 
ties, consequent upon the growth of a national 
spirit in the hitherto moribund nations of the 
East, and a belief that the commerce of Great 
Britain will suffer in competition with rivals she 
has herself fostered." 

The nation that is Britain's ally is, owing to 
that Alliance, fast becoming a commercial Power 
that is Britain's strongest antagonist. Col. Mur- 
ray states that Japan will undoubtedly secure the 
carrying trade of the whole Asiatic Pacific. Mur- 
ray's book, "Imperial Outposts," furnishes, in it- 
self, a striking sidelight upon the Alliance. The 
excellent maps and photographs add interest to 
a readable account of the strategic aspects of the 
long chain of Imperial outposts on the road be- 
tween England and . . . Australia? No; 
Japan. Murray's primary purpose was to exam- 
ine the conditions under which communication 
along the main highway round the Empire cap 
be maintained with Japan in the event of a mari- 
time war. The Alliance has marte it necessary 
to keep the road clear between the two parties. 
Australia does not He on that highway. Col. 
Murray does not mention Australia. 

The Alliance must cease some day. And then? 
Putnam Weale is explicit: 

"The moment is fast arriving when either a 
complete Russian entente will have to be ar- 
ranged, or permanent harm will be done to the 
British Empire." 

And the White Man in Asia — the entrenched 
White Man with the military railways — does not 
seem somehow quite convinced that he is not 
going to stay there. This fact Japan, harassed 
with internal chaos and poverty, will have to 
learn — that the White Man takes a lot of con- 
vincing. 

But all these analyses of the Asiatic_ situation 
end with the same conclusion. There is a won- 
derful and alarming stirring of the Asiatic hive. 
The new spirit of nationalism is abroad. China 
for the Chinese, Japan for herself and as much 
of Siam, Korea and Manchuria as she can get; 
Egypt for the Egyptians. Siam for the Siamese, 
Arabia for the Arabians— passive resister, or hos- 
tile trade antagonist, the aim is the same. Asia 
is growing self-conscious. It is time to look to 
our defenses. 

Ample evidence is afforded by our writers of 
the growth of a modern China, a China with a 
modern army and a new navy, a China that will 
be able to look after herself. At Shanghai the 
foreigner lives only on sufferance: "the_ yellow 
peril" is a living force of dangerous possibilities. 
Hongkong the Chinese intend to take by a flank 
attack; they will sap the trade of the greatest 
port in the world by establishing a rival Chinese 
free, port between it and Canton, the terminus of 
an immense system of railways netting the whole 
of China. At the termination of the Anglo-Japa- 
nese Alliance. China will be no longer a negligi- 
ble factor; she will be possessed of the power, 
not only of passive resistance, but of hostile 
action. The problem of China can only be solved 
by China; and indications point to its solution 
by the matter-of-fact means of an army and a 
navy. 

Meantime, we have eight years to get ready— 
a short eight seconds, before the referee calls 
"Time'"— The Bulletin, Sydney, N. S. W. 




SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 30, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., H. G. Lundberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. Nominations were made 
for delegates to the Convention of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America, to be held at 
Chicago, Dec. 2, 1907. The election will be held 
at the reguiar meetings held at Headnuarters and 
Branches on Oct. 28. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; few members ashore. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping prospects 
fair; men scarce. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping fairly good; prospects poor. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 16, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 26, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Win. Brisco in the chair. Nomina- 
tion for delegate to the Convention of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America will be 
made at the regular meetings held at Headquar- 
ters and at Branches on October 10, 1907. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 19, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 19, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping good. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, 111., Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

V. A. OLANDER, Sec'y pro tern. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping good. 

R. H. WALKER, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 18, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
l^A Lewis St. 



DIED. 

Alex Cosien, No. 854. a native of Germany, 
atrod 62, died at San Francisco, Cal., on Sept. 
2d, 1907. 

Claus Ludvig Clausen, No. 793, a native of 
Denmark, aged 27, drowned from the barkentinc 
John Smith, at sea, on Sept. 8, 1907. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







WEATHER BUREAU REPORT. 



A report just issued by the United States 
Weather Bureau shows that no less than 
250 lives were lost on the Great Lakes and 
connecting rivers during the 1906 season of 
navigation, and 229 vessels met with dis- 
aster during the season. Of this latter num- 
ber forty-nine were total losses. 

The monetary losses for the season of 
1906 amounted to $2,043,850, apportioned as 
follows: Total losses, $1,250,950; partial 
losses, $792,900. The aggregate loss during 
the season was greater than in any season 
for twelve years up to 1906, for which data 
are given, except 1905, when the loss in 
shipping destroyed in whole or in part was 
$4,055,250. 

Lake Superior's losses in 1906 were more 
numerous than those of any other Lake, 
amounting to $691,000. Lake Erie followed, 
with $428,000; Lake Huron third, with 
$412,000; Lake Michigan fourth, with $324,- 
000, while Lake Ontario's record was $34,- 
900. On the connecting rivers the losses 
amounted to $153,150. 

The total loss to vessels and vessel prop- 
erty in 1906, due to fog, amounted to $663,- 
400, and the greatest amount of damage 
from this cause in any one month was in 
June, $217,000. In August fogs were re- 
sponsible for losses to the extent of $161,000 
and $75,500 in May. The greatest loss from 
stress of weather was $471,750 in December. 

While the Weather Bureau report shows 
that 250 persons lost their lives on the Lakes 
and connecting rivers during the season of 
navigation, only eighty of them were lost 
through stress of weather, the remaining 170 
falling victims to other causes, the exact na- 
ture of which is not given. The greatest 
number of deaths occurred on Lake Erie, 
being 85 ; Lake Huron is second, with 47 ; 
Lake Michigan, 39; Lake Superior, 27; and 
Lake Ontario, 12. 

The worst single fatality was the loss of 
the Canadian passenger steamer J. H. Jones, 
which foundered off Cape Croker, Lake Hu- 
ron, on November 27, with all on board, 
twenty-six persons going to the bottom. 



BURNING OF THE MAJESTIC. 



Captain Hugh Hagen, of the steamer Ma- 
jestic, which was burned to the water's edge 
recently, says of the disaster : 

"A member of my crew discovered the 
fire, and at once reported to the mate. I 
was asleep in my bunk at the time. The 
mate called me, and immediately I ordered 
all hands to turn to and fight the flames. We 
went to our task without delay, but the fire 
had obtained too much of a hold on the ship, 
and despite our efforts we were beaten 
gradually back, and the flames got beyond 
our control. Seeing that further fighting 
was useless, I ordered my crew to lower 
the lifeboats. The Majestic was light, and 
I am unable to account for the origin of the 
fire. The Majestic is a total loss, and we all 
had a close call." 



It is understood that the City of Glasgow 
will be repaired before coming down the 
Lakes again. 



AGREEMENT WORKS WELL. 



The season of 1907, now rapidly draw- 
ing to its close, has been a most prosperous 
and peaceful one for the vesselowners and 
their employes. The wage agreement for 
1907 between the vesselowners and the sea 
men, firemen and cooks has, in the main, 
proven more satisfactory than any previous 
one. This speaks well for the fairness not 
only of our employers and our own mem- 
bers but of the executive officers of the ves- 
sels also. Trouble, the bugbear of the dele- 
gates, is a rare thing, and the "kicker" ap- 
pears to have emigrated. There are rare ex- 
ceptions of course, but these only serve to 
remind us that you can't please everybody 
all the time. The watch-and- watch for all 
hands has become an institution on the 
Lakes, and with very few exceptions it is 
granted by the officers without protest, and, 
what is far more important, without objec- 
tion. Say what you will, we all know that it 
rests with the officers as to whether the ves- 
sel will have a happy, satisfied crew, or not. 
We know that the old saying, "the mate 
makes the boat" is true ; he can make her a 
good job or a bad one, simply as he feels 
friendly or otherwise toward the men who 
make up his crew. This, of course, is true 
also of the chief engineer and all officers. 
This is the beauty of Section 6 of the agree- 
ment. Few of the officers find any objection 
to it, and therefore it works smoothly. 

The policy of the Lake seamen's unions, 
that of peace and good will, has proven to 
be the proper one, and as a result we are 
now members of the best union in the world, 
one of the largest and one of the richest. 
Our members are loyal and true and the dis- 
gruntled fault-finder, who has predicted dis- 
aster and ruin each winter and each sum- 
mer is now out of a job. May he never 
appear again, and may we continue in the 
same course of prosperity and peace for 
many, many years. 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



The United States Lake Survey steamer 
General Williams, engaged in sweeping in 
the west end of Lake Erie, has re-located the 
wreck of the steamer Grand Traverse, lying 
one and one-tenth miles north and five- 
eighths of a mile west of Colchester light- 
house. The hull lies in thirty-five feet of 
water and the least depth found on it was 
twenty-two feet at the present stage of Lake 
Erie. The wreck has been temporarily 
marked by a white flag with a red center, 
with the name, "United States Lake Survey" 
printed on it. 



\\ ork lias been begun marking off the new 
channel across St. Louis Bay, connecting the 
north channel at the Mesaba dock with the 
Wisconsin channel, and it is expected that 
the lighthouse people will put up the lights 
in a few days. News that this channel is 
being finally marked by the Government will 
be good to the masters who make the Mesa- 
ba docks. After the lights are installed it is 
expected that the channel will be used gen- 
erally by vessels going to the ore docks 
either in the daytime or at night. 



MORE NEW LIGHTHOUSES. 



Congressman William II. Ryan returned 
to Buffalo recently from a three weeks' in- 
spection tour of the lighthouses in Lakes 
Michigan and Superior. Mr. Ryan, with 
Congressmen Mann, of Illinois, and Esch, 
of Wisconsin, comprise the sub-committee 
on lighthouses. Accompanied by Com- 
mander Orchard, Inspector of Lighthouses, 
they visited a number of important houses 
on the Upper Lakes in the Lighthouse ten- 
der Sumac. The trip started and ended at 
Chicago. 

It has been decided by the committee to 
recommend the erection of a lighthouse on 
the White Shoal at the entrance of the 
Straits of Mackinaw now marked by a light- 
ship. The new lighthouse will cost $250,- 
000. There will also be erected a lighthouse 
at the western extremity of Isle Royale, in 
Lake Superior, over the ownership of which 
there is now some controversy between the 
American and Canadian governments. 
North Manitou Island will get a new light- 
house, which will have to be built in seven- 
teen feet of water, the existing one, half a 
mile nearer shore, to be abandoned. 



ASHTABULA GETS 600-FOOTER. 



The period of 600-footers has arrived in 
Ashtabula, the first ship of that class to 
visit that port being the steamer Edward 
Y. Tovvnsend, which arrived on September 
8 and was unloaded at the new Lake 
front docks of the Pennsylvania company. 
She brought in 11,472 tons of ore, the larg- 
est ever unloaded there. As these docks and 
several of the big steamers are handled by 
the M. A. Hanna Company, it is expected 
that the Townsend and like boats will here- 
after be regular traders there. 

Owing to sharp bends in the river and ad- 
jacents slips, it has never before been pos- 
sible to unload a boat of that class at Ash- 
tabula, but with the installation of the new 
machines on the straight river front the har- 
bor is in shape to handle anything that may 
come its way. 



Canadian shipping on the Great Lakes has 
had its most active year in the grain trade 
thus far. From Fort William and Port Ar- 
thur from the opening of navigation, April 
30, to July 31, the following grain shipments 
were made: Wheat, 22,275,141 bushels ; oats, 
7,061,650 bushels; barley, 619,717 bushels; 
flax, 281,410 bushels. The bulk of this was 
carried in Canadian vessels. Foreign vessels 
carried 5,838,069 bushels of wheat, 969,518 
of oats, and 38,521 of barley. Shipments to 
Montreal were 18,656,805 bushels, and to 
Buffalo 8,607,506 bushels. 



Blame for the collision between the tugs 
M. D. Carrington and Walton B., at the In- 
terstate bridge, September 7, has been 
placed upon the pilots of the two vessels, 
and their pilots' licenses have been sus- 
pended fifteen days each. They are John H. 
O'Meara, of the Carrington, and T. R. Cart- 
land, of the Walton B. At the investigation 
both men admitted having violated the har- 
bor regulations. 



k 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



Two ordinary-seamen were fined at Con- 
neaut recently for shipping on steamers to 
get meals, eating those meals and deserting 
the boat. 



The floating drydock at Bay City, owned 
by James Degrace, and which was operated 
for years by F. W. Wheeler, has been sold to 
James Demarest, of Toledo. 



Last season, from August to December, 
inclusive, vessels moved 57,028,580 bushels 
of grain of all kinds from the Head of the 
Lakes. Present indications are not bright 
for a repetition of so large a movement this 
year. 



Comrade Frank Kelly, ordinary-seaman, 
who was hurt at Conneaut in the fall of 
1906, and who spent some time in the Gen- 
eral Hospital there, will please communicate 
with W. H. Jenkins, Conneaut, regarding 
his case, which has been settled. 



The new package freight steamer Roch- 
ester, being built at Ecorse yards for the 
Western Transit Company, will be launched 
the last of the present month. The Roch- 
ester is 408 feet over all, and will carry 
5000 and 7000 tons of freight. 



The Frontier Steamship Company is the 
name of the company that has placed an 
order with the Great Lakes Engineering 
Works for two boats. The company was 
incorporated in New York State in July 
with a capital stock of $630,000. 



Word comes from Superior that the body 
of a man found floating in the slip of the 
Great Northern dock at that place has been 
identified as that of George Meyers, oiler of 
the steamer Niagara, from Buffalo. He was 
an Odd Fellow, a member of the Firemen's 
Union, and is said to have a left a wife and 
two children at Buffalo. 



Lake men now believe that the old hoodoo 
that followed the steamer Peerless, still 
hovers over that vessel under her new name 
of City of Muskegon. The boat was released 
recently after being thirty-six hours stuck in 
shallow water near the city dock on White 
Lake. As the Peerless, the steamer a short 
time ago broke an eccentric rod five miles 
out from Muskegon. 



The Lake Survey steamer General Wil- 
liams reports the discovery of a wreck in 
thirty-six feet of water two miles north 
and east of Colchester light. It lies close to 
the track of boats bound for Detroit River, 
and taking the north side of Colchester light. 
It has twenty-three feet of water over it at 
the present stage, but in stormy weather 
would be a dangerous obstruction. 



The steamer Crete was launched at the 
Lorain yards of the American Shipbuilding 
Company on September 7. The Crete is 
built for the Lackawana Steamship Com- 
pany and is the third of eight which will be 
constructed. She is 500 feet over all, beam 
fifty-two feet -and depth thirty-one feet. She 
will be fitted with Scotch boilers and Ameri- 
can Shipbuilding Company's engines. Cap- 
tain F. B. Huyck will take the Crete out 
within five weeks. 



NO UNNECESSARY WHISTLING. 



Managers of some of the prominent Lake 
fleets are giving the matter of unnecessary 
whistling close attention. The first to take 
action was General Manager Schantz, of the 
D. & C.-D. & B. lines, who will instruct the 
captains of the combined passenger fleet 
that in the .future there must be no unneces- 
sary whistling of any nature. The captains 
will be instructed not to answer compli- 
.mentary salutes from other vessels, as such 
whistling is in violation of the Government 
rules, and is regarded by the company as a 
dangerous proceeding, particularly where a 
large number of vessels are constantly pass- 
ing, as is the case in the Detroit and St. Clair 
rivers. 

It is settled that the Steamboat Inspec- 
tors, who have no option, will enforce the 
ruling covering the matter of unnecessary 
whistling. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 
ville. 



Robert Reesor, No. 5174, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with 
G. O. Reesor, 103 Fuller street, Toronto, 
Canada. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE. WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT., CANADA Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA (Box 96) King Street 



We Don't Patronize. 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
theim & Schiffer, of New York City; Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Flour — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Valley City Milling Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

Whiskey — Finch Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 
Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. ; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Henry H. Roe- 

lof & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y. ; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y. ; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printing — Hudson, Kimberiey & Co., printers, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond, Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, 111.; Corning Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement — Portland Peninsular Cement Company, Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 
Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Baily & Co., Am- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Brown & Sharpe Tool 
Company, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden, N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville. 111.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company). Rutland. Vt.; Erie City Iron 
Works. Erie, Pa.; Singer Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.; Pittsburg Expanded Metal Co.. Pitts- 
burg, Pa.; American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul, 
Minn.; Standard Sewing Machine Company, Cleve- 
land, Ohio; Manitowoc Dry Dock Company, Manito- 
woc, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo.; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; Home Stove 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, Circle- 
viUe, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; O. Wisner Piano Company. Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumbei — Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash.; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolis, 
Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Raymondsville, N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper — William Bailey & Sons, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., TToboken, N. J. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany, Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth— Thos. E. Gleeson, East Newark. N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Bill Posters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co., and New York Bill Posting Co., New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddlngton Hotel. Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

'*.•. Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry. Indianapolis. Ind. 
Thomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grnpo Nuts and Postum 

Cereal. Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A QUESTION OF RACE. 



There was another slight eruption from 
the volcano that underlies the western and 
northwestern shores of America at Belling- 
ham. Wash., and spread to Vancouver, B. C. 
Ever since the Burlingame treaty with 
China the causes for these eruptions have 
Steadily grown, and now the situation has 
become so acute as to threaten the world's 
peace. Many superficial writers and pub- 
licists carry the idea that these outbreaks 
are merely over a question of wages and 
that labor unions foster them from selfish 
reasons. There could not be a more erro- 
neous idea. The question of race and re- 
ligious supremacy, the ideals of Christianity 
and of civilization, governmental standards 
and of the progress of the white race, are 
the underlying causes. 

In the days of Dennis Kearney those with 
selfish interests to conserve gave out to the 
world that the antipathy to the Chinese 
arose from a question of wages alone. The 
truth was, and is, that it was the habits, the 
standard of living and the environments 
which the Asiatic brought with him that 
aroused the white working people. They 
did not desire to be reduced to the level of 
wharf rats for homes for their families. 
Neither did they wish to raise families in 
such surroundings. They did not desire 
their girls and boys to be reared in familiar- 
ity with ferocious vices of the Tongs. And 
they made that protest heard and heeded. 

Now the people on the Pacific Coast have 
two other brands of the same type to con- 
tend with, the Hindoos and the Japanese. 
The same things that caused the outbreaks 
against the Chinese are the same that impel 
the Canadians, the Australians and the peo- 
ple of our Pacific States. The time has 
come when there will be an armed clash be- 
tween those of the Occident and the Orient, 
between the followers of Christ or Buddha, 
for white or yellow supremacy, and it is beg- 
ging the question to argue that it is due 
alone to wages or labor conditions, though if 
that is to be the one discussed by the pro- 
ponents of Asiatic and servile labor gen- 
erally who allege that the white, free labor- 
ing man of the United States cares for noth- 
ing but high wages and short hours. 

But that is reducing the question to ma- 
terial ground and away from the lofty ideals 
of Christianity and civilization, which are 
the things really involved. It is not as some 
assumed the Saxon against the Slav, but the 
Saxon and the Slav against race and re- 
ligious extinction. The Caucasian race can 
not uplift the Mongolian to its plane ; the 
history of the Mongolian race is a history 
of the subjugation and the absorption of 
every other race to the Mongolian's ideals 
and race with which it came in contact. And 
these conflicts on our Western Coast are the 
first symptoms of rebellion of the white man 
against extinction and absorption. Just as 
the red man could not withstand the con- 
tact with the white man so neither can the 
white man withstand the contact with the 
yellow man. An apt instance of this can be 
found in the Sandwich Islands. Governor 
Dole, who first welcomed the Japanese to 
Hawaii, only last week declared that the 
Island was to all intents and purpose a Japa- 
nese colony, and that every steamer carried 
white people from the Island because they 
could not abide under Japanese conditions. 
The same is true in various portions of Cali- 
fornia, Washington, Oregon and Texas. Just 



as Australia has shut the door against the 
Jap it will be shut in the United States, 
Africa and Canada. It is either that or a 
Mongolian supremacy in these countries. 
One or the other must and will go. 

When the armed struggle comes for su- 
premacy there will be no doubt of the issue, 
and future historians will eulogize the now 
much despised trade-unions and point out 
that it was through their efforts that Chris- 
tianity and civilization were saved, and some 
spot on the Pacific will bear the same rela- 
tion to the struggle that the heights of Val- 
my bear to the conflict that saved Europe 
from Moslem domination. — United Mine 
Workers' Journal. 



TYPOTHETAE ATTENDS FUNERAL. 



International Typographical Union, Office 

of the President. 

Indianapolis, Indiana, Sept. 12, 1907. 
To the Membership of the International 

Typographical Union : 

The United Typothetae of America was 
in convention in Niagara Falls, Canada, on 
the 10th and 11th of this month. 

I am in a position to state positively that 
not more than thirty delegates were in at- 
tendance upon this convention. 

The sessions covered only two days, ap- 
proximately a total of only twelve hours. 

President Berry, of the International 
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, 
appeared before the convention and re- 
quested a modification of the contract be- 
tween the International Printing Pressmen 
and Assistants' Union and the United Typo- 
thetae of America on the "Closed Shop" 
question. His request was turned down by 
the remnant of the Typothetae. I understand 
that President Berry will recommend to his 
organization, on a referendum proposition, 
that immediate demand be made for the 
eight-hour day and "Closed Shop." 

My information is also to the effect that a 
more disconsolate, disgusted, and utterly 
routed relic of a once great organization 
never met in convention than the United 
Typothetae of America in its Niagara Falls 
session this week. 

Claim was made in the newspapers in an 
inconspicuous item that 150 delegates were 
in attendance at the Typothetae convention. 
But I reiterate, and am prepared with evi- 
dence to sustain the statement, that not 
more than thirty delegates were in attend- 
ance, and that the convention was an abso- 
lute, abject failure. 

If any further evidence were needed that 
we have won the greatest industrial battle 
of modern times, that beyond peradventure 
we have established the eight-hour day, that 
we have contributed most materially to the 
universal shorter workday, it was furnished 
by the pitiful exhibition of the United Ty- 
pothetae of America in annual session in 
Niagara Falls this week. 
Fraternally, 

James M. Lynch. 



Since the adoption of the present Chinese 
Immigration Act in January, 1904, providing 
for a poll tax of $500 on every Chinese laborer 
who enters Canada, only forty Chinamen have 
been added to the population of Montreal, add- 
ing $20,000 to the revenue of the Dominion 
Government. There are now 1,700 Chinamen 
in the local colony at Montreal, and with a tax 
of $500 a head on laborers its growth is prac- 
tically prohibited. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, Wash., 3004 Mr-Carver St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 'Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. Or., 51 Union Ave. 
ET'REKA, Cal.. P. O. Box 327. 
PAX PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT7 E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Or., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



2), 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Dietrich Doerflin, born 1861, is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco, Cal. 

Ludwig Luhrs, a native of Altona, Germany, is 
inquired for by the German Consul at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

August Ferdinand Johansen is inquired for by 
his brother, Otto Wilhclm Johansen. Address 
British ship Craighal!, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Bror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derhults, Forsamlin, Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martell, a native of Finland, aged about 
47, last heard of on the Pacific Coast about 15 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg, Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago, is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing his present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Fcrndale, Wash. 

Ivar Walter Lindblom, native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address. 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis, Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years, 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 









COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



APPEAL FOR TELEGRAPHERS. 



General Offices, Monon Building, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Chicago, September 16, 1907. 

To Organized Labor — Greeting: 

The Commercial Telegraphers' Union of 
America is now engaged in a tremendous 
struggle with the Western Union and Postal 
Telegraph Companies and the Associated 
Press. The fight was not of our seeking, but 
came as a result of a lack of good faith on 
the part of the employers in negotiations 
with our representatives. 

Over 80 per cent of the Commercial Teleg- 
raphers are on strike, and over 90 per cent 
of those directly employed by the two com- 
panies and the Associated Press. Our mem- 
bers reported to the strike call unanimously, 
and 90 per cent of those telegraphers' who 
were not members walked out, and are still 
out. 

We are contending for principles vital to 
every trades unionist, and we believe a de- 
feat for us would be a setback to the entire 
labor movement. 

Our demands are : 

An eight-hour day. 

Equal pay for equal work by men or 
women. 

Fifteen per cent increase. 

That the companies furnish typewriters. 

We are now in the fifth week of this 
struggle and sooner or later victory may de- 
pend on our ability to give financial assist- 
ance to the strikers. 

Our treasury contained a creditable 
amount at the beginning of this trouble, but 
the drain has already proven a heavy one. 

For more than a month the strikers have 
presented a solid front, reiterating day after 
day and week after week their determination 
to remain out until an honorable adjustment 
is had. The employers, on the other hand, 
"stand pat" and say to the press "the strikers 
will return to work once their pockets and 
stomachs become empty." 

It comes to us from reliable sources that 
the Board of Directors of the Western Un- 
ion, at their meeting a week ago, decided to 
continue the fight for a limited time, or so 
long as the public will tolerate the demoral- 
ized condition in which the telegraph service 
of the country is now in. 

Feeling that we can not with honor to our- 
selves, and in justice to our fellow-workers 
and those in sympathy with the trade-union 
movement surrender to the telegraph trust, 
we make this appeal for financial assistance, 
in order that we may care for our members 
while the strike lasts. Our fight is won now 
so far as the sticking of our membership is 
concerned, but we must have outside assist- 
ance in order to win. 

Men and women can not be expected to 
long contend for their rights upon hungry 
stomachs ; to provide at least the absolute 
necessities of life is essential, and to secure 
these we require your financial assistance. 
We therefore ask your aid. We trust we 
will hear favorably from you and assure you 
that your aid will be appreciated. 

Fraternally yours, 

S. J. Small, President. 
Attest : 

Wesley Russell, 

General Secretary-Treasurer. 

N. B. — Make all checks or money orders 
payable to Wesley Russell, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Room 930, Monon Building, Chi- 



cago, 111., and notify S. J. Small, President, 
same address. 



Office American Federation of Labor. 
Washington, D. C, September 18, 1907. 
To Organized Labor : 

The appeal of the Commercial Teleg- 
raphers' Union for financial assistance has 
the full indorsement and approval of the 
Executive Council of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

Realizing the tremendous importance and 
the vast interests involved, the Executive 
Council tendered its good offices to both the 
organization and the companies. The or- 
ganization accepted the offer, both the com- 
panies spurned it. It is evidently the policy 
and hope of the companies to not only crush 
the Telegraphers' organization, but their 
spirit and aspiration for a brighter and better 
day. While we do not aim at the humiliation 
of the companies, yet labor and its friends 
can not permit the men being ridden over 
roughshod. 

An honorable adjustment of the contest 
can be attained, if the companies understand 
that the telegraphers can not be starved into 
an unconditional surrender. To accomplish 
this purpose labor must come to the financial 
assistance of the telegraphers. 

All unions are urgently requested to at 
once donate and voluntarily contribute as 
generously and promptly as possible and to 
forward same to Wesley Russell, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Room 930, Monon Building, Chi- 
cago, 111., and notify S. J. Small, President 
same address. 

Fraternally yours, 

Samuel Gompers, 

President American Federation of Labor. 
Frank Morrison, Secretary. 



GERMAN LABOR MARKET. 



According to the following statistics Ger- 
man industries are in a flourishing condi- 
tion : For the months of May and June, 
1907, there were for every 10Q open posi- 
tions for skilled and other labor 100.7 and 
94.4 persons, respectively, against 101.5 and 
105.1 persons during the same months of 
1906; 119.7 and 113.4 persons in 1905, and 
172 and 167.8 persons looking for employ- 
ment in the respective months of May and 
June, 1902. The over-supply in the labor 
market has disappeared and a scarcity of 
help has set in. Such a condition has not 
existed in Germany since the year 1900, and 
only in the year 1899 was the scarcity in help 
felt more than now. In the iron industry 
the business for the month of June was still 
heavier than for May, and nearly all impor- 
tant iron industrial centers report scarcity of 
help. The building branch alone suffered a 
relapse in activity, which is mainly due to 
inclement weather, stiffness in the money 
market and the many strikes in that branch. 
The mining business has improved so much 
that although quite a number of men from 
the building branch were employed in the 
mines, the demand for skilled labor in the 
mines could nowhere be sufficiently sup- 
plied. In many textile and clothing manu- 
facturing districts the lack of tailors is much 
complained of. The scarcity of female serv- 
ants is greater than ever. Help for the 
agricultural districts, although far from suf- 
ficient, is somewhat easier to get this year 
than last. 



VANCOUVER'S PECULIAR IDEA. 



Nearly 1,000 Hindoos, 149 Chinese, and 
114 Japanese arrived at Vancouver, B. C, 
by the steamer Monteagle on Wednesday. 
Strange to say, the loyal British subjects 
who have made their homes in Vancouver 
neither welcomed the Chinese, nor the Japa- 
nese, though the subjects of England's ally, 
nor even their fellow subjects from Hindoo- 
stan. 

In fact, so much popular distrust of "the 
little brown brothers" has been shown in 
Vancouver of late, and so much was dis- 
played on this occasion, that Mayor Bethune 
felt constrained to inform the captain of the 
Monteagle that he could not guarantee the 
Oriental visitors a pleasant or even a peace- 
able reception. 

However, the ingenuity of Mayor Bethune 
has suggested a method of dealing with 
the situation which may serve to bring home 
its meaning to those really responsible for 
it. The method is that the citizens of Van- 
couver do more than was asked of them for 
their Oriental visitors, and charter a special 
train to convey them to Ottawa, the seat of 
the Dominion Government, there to be dis- 
posed of according to Government wisdom. 

To show his faith by his works Mayor 
Bethune headed a public subscription with 
$100, and the latest reports from Vancouver 
indicate that the sum required will be raised, 
and this contingent of "brown brothers" 
added to Ottawa's population instead of to 
Vancouver's. 

Mayor Bethune's plan seems to possess 
several merits. If carried out it would, in a 
way, give to the Dominion officials an object 
lesson whose effects might be salutary. 
Furthermore, as most of the persons with 
whom it is to be applied are British subjects 
they should be as welcome in Ottawa as Ot- 
tawa thinks they should be in Vancouver. 

It is to be hoped that the white men of 
Vancouver will carry out their plan for the 
entertainment of the Oriental visitors. Send- 
ing them to Ottawa may have the effect 
of a trephining operation upon certain Gov- 
ernmental skulls there and in London. It 
may wake up some Governmental minds 
there and in London to the truth that the 
prejudice of white men against living with 
yellow men is something that can not be 
argued down or sentimentalized away. 

It is equally to be hoped, however, that 
San Francisco will not imitate Vancouver by 
sending on to Oyster Bay the next shipload 
of Japanese that arrive. The Japanese are 
not American citizens, nor even the subjects 
of a power with which the United States 
Government has an offensive and defensive 
alliance. 

Hence, Mr. Roosevelt, despite the admira- 
tion that he has expressed for the Japanese 
as a people in a message to Congress, could 
hardly be expected to take a lively personal 
interest in a thousand or so of them, dumped 
into Oyster Bay all at once, and might find 
their presence embarrassing. — Inter Ocean, 
Chicago, 111. 



The new immigration plan in the State of 
Sao Paulo, and more or less in Brazil in gen- 
eral, is to found colonies of people of one na- 
tionality. Hence the Secretary of Agriculture 
at Sao Paulo is making arrangements to es- 
tablish several German colonies at once. At 
present the 1,500,000 Italians constitute the 
dominant nationality. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






World's Workers. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



News comes from the sugar districts 
of Australia that white labor is work- 
ing splendidly, and there is no scar- 
city of men. 

Sawmill employes at Lismore, New 
South Wales, have secured through 
their union, a substantial increase in 
wages, the eight-hour day, and pref- 
erence for unionists. 

It is reported that a large number 
of the French priests who lost their 
livings owing to the Separation law 
are having recourse to manual labor 
in order to earn their living. 

The New Zealand waterside work- 
ers are urging the Parliament of that 
country to limit the size of coal 
baskets to five to the ton; carrying 
baskets twelve to the ton; and grain 
sacks to not more than 200 pounds. 

Labor leader Bath, of Wesl Aus- 
tralia, condemns the amended Arbi- 
tration Act introduced by the Gov- 
ernment of that State, as a primitive 
measure aimed at trade-unionism, and 
actuated by the worst manifestations 
of party bias. 

The temperance question was dis- 
cussed at the Social Democratic Con- 
vention in Essen, Germany. Only 
one vote was cast against a resolution 
whose main feature was an expres- 
sion of opposition to the use of 
alcohol in any form during working 
hours. 

Recently the Colonial Sugar Re- 
finery Company, at Aloomba, Cjueens- 
land, insisted on five drivers, who 
had been on non-agreement for 
five weeks, signing the company's 
cast-iron agreement, and because they 
refused five Japs were put on in their 
places. 

Great Britain is on the eve of a 
vast railway strike, possibly the 
greatest the world has ever known. 
The employes want the committee of 
directors officially to meet a com- 
mittee belonging to their union to 
discuss their alleged grievances, with 
a view to amicable settlement. 

The Adelaide (Australia), Ware- 
housemen, Shop Assistants, and Clerks' 
unions have recently become affiliated 
with the local Trades and Labor 
Council. Queensland clerks have no 
union, and the respect in which they 
are held by employers can be meas- 
ured by the low wages they receive. 

In giving his decision in the Arbi- 
tration Court in connection with the 
claims of the Sydney (Australia) Shop 
Assistants' Union. Judge Heydon 
pointed out that the establishment of 
a fair wage might cause loss to some 
employers, but as a whole the in- 
dustry was prosperous, and to wait 
until no one was injured would be to 
wait forever. 

Seven workmen and two girls were 
executed at Lodz, Russia, on Septem- 
ber 23 by shooting without trial for 
participating in the murder of Marias 
Silberstein, owner of a large local 
cotton mill, who was killed by his em- 
ployes on September 13 because he 
refused to pay them for the time 
they were out on strike. Police and 
troops made a sudden descent on the 
mill and arrested 800 of the employes. 

The joint board of the Parlia- 
mentary Committee of the Trade- 
Union Congress, the General Federa- 
tion of Trade-Unions, and the Labor 
party of Great Britain have issued a 
report on unemployment, in which it 
is recommended that trade-unions be 
urged to abolish overtime, and that 
where this is not wholly possible, it be 
restricted to the narrowest limits, and 
that when worked, it be penalized to 
the fullest extent. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Succcor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots, Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe-$2.00 to $5.00~Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered and shipped 
to any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Lit- 
tle Beauty,' the "Princess" and 
other high grade unlon-madeclgars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period If 
not called or sent for. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 

Board and lodging. $5 per week. Single 

meals, 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 

322 First St., between D and E. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAIIAMSEN, Prop. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 

Neatest and Cleanest Place In Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

Union Label Goods. 

A. ROSENSTEIN, Prop. 

23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore. 

Phone Clay 685. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Arras, Morltz 
Andersen, -1550 
Anderson, A. 
Andersen, Frltjof 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bergh, Edw. 
Bawens, Edemon 
BJorkas, Herman 
Boose, Paul 
Bluhm. Peter 
rialton, Thos. H. 
Eliassen, O. E. 
Elving, Gust 
Ehlers, Henry 
Eriksen. E. 
Enzbretsen. Dan. B. 
Gordlad. Arthur 
Gustafson, E. A. 
Goethe, Victor B. 
Griel. B. 
Hartman. Karl 
Helms, Wm. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Harrald 
Irera, John 
Jaensen, Hans 
Jacobsson, John 
Johannessen, Hani 

H. 
Jansen, -1728 
Janson. Oscar 
.Tohanson, A. J. 
Jorgensen, Ernst 
Krlstoffersen, Emll 
Kaderhecht, Alf. 
Karlsson, A. M. 



Kaufold. E. 
Lyche. H. M. 
Lettve, Honore 
Lang, G. 
Llndstrom, 



Emll 



Llndeman, A. 
Le Fever, Louis 
Maack, Hans 
Nordstrom, Knut 

Olaf 
Nurml, E. W. -865 
Nurmlnen, J. V. 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen, Albert 
Ordlg, Bruno 
Petersen. Ed. 
Pettersson, G. E. 
Petterson, Harald 
Petterson, Mauri tz 
Raetz. Aug. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Russell, Ed. 
Svendsen, Thorval 
Selander, Gust 
Swanson, Ivar 
Smith, Max 
Schmidt, E. 
Staaf, Louis 
Thomson, John 
Tyrholm, Johan 
Udd. John 
Vincent, Joseph 
Walter. M. 
Westln, John 
Wllsen, And«ri 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St.. next to Commercial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND. WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton flannel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Adams, Joseph 
Aga, Johan 
Akesson. H. 
Allendsen, H. 
Albers, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 
Amnell, A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
Anderson, H. M. 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Victor 
Anderson, L. T. -735 
Anderson, Hjalmar 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen, -1520 
Apps, P. 

Appelqulst, O. T. 
Arnesen. Martin 
Aspen, K. D. 
Austin, M. M. 
Bateman, S. J. 
Berg, Albert 
Bernard, S. 
Belin, Erik 
Bensen, F. 
Bernert, F. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bensen. J. E. 
Berg, H. M. 
Bee. Colin 
Berkelund, R. 
Bindseil. W. 
Billington, J. M. 
Bjornholm, H. 
Biecka. A. 
Blomberg, G. 
Botgereist, L. 
Boose. P. 
Bratrud. O. M. 
Braa, P. O. 
Brunstrom, G. 
Bronelew. W. 
Brewer. W. 
Brown, F. 
Brynlng, W. 
Brown, James 
Burk, C. 
Buoktman. F. 
Bundersen, Jens 
Carlson. Jacob 
Carlsen, Hans 
Capello, H. 
Carlson. A. 
Carlson. R. -656 
Carlson. J. -861 
Chotard, Emll 
Clewlev. James 
Clark. S. D. 
Clauson, C. L. 
fortes, P. 
Cook, H. 
Cori. V. 
Craig. C. A. 
Christensen, O. 
Danlelsen. David 
Daniels, C. 
Danlelsen. Ernest 
Dennett. J. 
Deboth, Paul 
Doran, Eugene 
Dorest, A. C. 
Dohman, F. 
Duncure, Y. 
Dudler, H. 
Ed son, F. 
Edvardsen, J. 
Ekeland. S. 
Elllngsen. H. 
Eltman. H. 
Englund. R. 
Englund, L. F. 
Engberg, O. 
Erikson, Olav 
Erlksen, Allen 
Erlksen. Viktor 
Eriksen. Konrad 
Eriksen, Aug 
Eskola, H. 
Evans. S. 
Ferraris. J. 
Fernandez, D. 
Fitzgerald. H. 
Fisher. T. 
Flvnn. P. 
Karlsnn. G. -622 
Frlvold. J. J. 
Fredrlksen, W. 
Frlcke. C. 
Frankenberg. V. 
Oarhers. H. 
Old. V. 
Camber. .Tas. 
Oerner. Hans 
Oenstrom. F. 
nnerke E. 
nndt. W. 
("Jrower Alton 
Ornnbolk. J. 
Irppn. J. 
^nnnason. J. 
Onndorsen. O. 
"Iimther. Rleharl 
Onndersen. And. 
OiKJtnfsen Karl 
^ntmnn. H. 
r-Tansen. "Fred 
"«n«»n TT -1723 
tt.,,. t*r _f|7<) 
TTarker. TTfl. 
Waker. Max 
Wartnett. W. 
TTf»TiQ*»Ti. Maurice 
"icnn. C L. 
"anem. TT. C 
TTanaon. N. 
TTa^-e A. 
TT*]*or!» O. 
TTardv. W. 
TTan°en. .Albert 

TTTneori. TV. 
TTnrto'er. "R. 

TJopmn T. E 
TTTlroTiflPn John 
TTolmc W 
TTp^ nn Kprr, O. 
TnrminBpn_ JP. 
Henrlks. G. 



F. 



Helenius, K. 
Henning, L. 
Hlkellct, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg, W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holtl, J. W. 
Honde, P. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustide, H. 
Hultberg, E. J. 
Ingebretsen. John 
Ingebretsen. Karl 
Ingalls, W. L. 
Iversen, S. B. 
Isaksen, I. 
Ivarsen, I. 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen, J. A. 
Jacobs, W. M. 
Jacobsen, Johan 
Jacobsen, H. M. 
Jacobsen, John 
Jack, P. 

Jacobsson, Johan 
Jensen, P. -1431 
Jensen. E. -1298 
Jensen, J. G. -1668 
Jensen, P. -748 
Jensen. J. G. -686 
Johansen, T. B. 
Johansen, A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johnsen, Aug. -1451 
Johnsen. Fr. 
Johnson, C. J. -1666 
Johnson, N. G. 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson. H. L. 
Johnson. Tim 
Johnsson, John A. 
Johnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 
.Tonsson. A. J. 
Jones. Fred. 
Jorgensen, Alf. 
Jorgensen, Th. 
Jorgensen. J. A. 
Jurgenson. John 
Jordt, P .-1737 
Jurgenson. Ernest 
Kahlbetzer. P 
Karison, J. A. -388 
Kanford. Ed 
Karlstrom, C. 
Karslmer. N. J. 
Kermagoret, A. 
Kelly. P. 
Kittelsen, K. 
Kinloch. W 
Klemettllla. H. 
Kloes. W. O. F. 
Klemensen, C. 
Knoff, H. 

Kristensen, E. -901 
Krause, E. 
Kreutz, C. 
Kristensen. K. D. 
Krager, H. 
Kristensen, G. 
Kroemke. N. 
Krouschet. A. T. 
Kristoffersen, Emll 
Kummerlowe, O. 
Laix, N. E. 
Laine. W. E. -1414 
Larsen, H. -957 
Larsen, K. H. 
Larsen, H. -1195 
Larsen, Mathlas 
Larsen. Eingal 
Lemerle, C. 
Lepp. p. 
Le Fevre, L. 
Lersten, J. 
Lldgett. J. A. 
LInd. H. E. 
Lie. L. 

Linden. H. Vanden 
Llndeman, II. 
Lie. J. L. 
Lorho. M. 
Lunde. O. 
Lundgren. R. 
Luherk. R. A. 
Lvsell. Geo. 
Matt son. F. 
Martinsen. K. 
Madson. O. F. 
Mathlsen. M. 
Marthinsen, Kr. 
Mayers, P. M. 

Mnhan. W. F. 
McKenzie, A. 
Mens. J. 
Mostrand. O. 
Mietenan. J. 
Mldlo. A. 
Miller, r. W. 
Mfkkelsen. Kr. 
Monchy, ir. 

Merken. J. L. 
Muller. P. 
Muller. IT. 
Munby. J. W. 
Nass. Axel 
Nesbltt, James 
Nielsen. N. -751 
Nilsen. Edwin 

Nllsen, B. s. -731 

Nielsen, Anders 
Nilsen, Olans 
Nllsen. C. L. 
Nielsen. N. K. V. 
Nllsen. K. C. -972 
Nilsen, C. V. 
Nilson. C. J. -885 
Norris, J. E. 
Nolan. James 
Nvhagen. Julius 
Nystrom, Ragner 
Oextiger. O. 
Olsen. Ludvlg 
Olson. Harry 
Olsen. Oscar 
Olsen. fhrlst 
Olsen. Ravnvald 
Olssen. Johan 
Olson. K. E 
Olsen. TT. M. 
Olsen. Just. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT," OWNED BY A. 

M. BENDETSON, CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

UNION MADE HATS 

UNION MADE SHOES 

UNION MADE COLLARS 

UNION MADE SUSPENDERS 

UNION MADE GLOVES 

UNION MADE OVERALLS 

UNION MADE SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



BURNETT BROS, 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & 

G STREETS, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



GRIGGS' HARDWARE STORE 

SHIP CHANDLER 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street 

ABERDEEN, - - - WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 
EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



THE HUB 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING STORE 
L. FOGEL, Prop. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubebr Boots 
to a Talior-made Suit. 

405 HERON STREET. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Olsen, Leip. Sayland, A. 

Olsen, Ernst Solie, I. 

Osterberg, J. Sovig, M. 

Ossis, A. Senderman, G. 

Petersen, A. W. Soheland, O. N. 

Petersen, Paul Stenberg, Alt. 

Otto, L. Sten, Ivar 

Overland, T. Stervik. Louis 

Parkhurst, Thos. Sterr, W. T. 

Paulson, Hans Stuhr, H. M. 

Petersen, Ch. -990 strandquist, Louis 

Pettersen, Axel Steine, I. L. 

Pedersen, L. Stickles, L. A. 

Petersen, Peter stein, A. -1883 

Pederson, K. -980 Stewart, F. 

Pederson, John Sveerd, S. H. 

Pendville, N. Swanson, Hugo 

Peterson, Mauritz Svensson, G. A. -1295 

Penosch, P. Taylor, A. 

Plummer, Karl Tereutt M 

Prescott, F. F. Thomsen, P. -1432 

Pohler, Joseph Thomas, Wm. 

Polge, Louis Thun, E. H. 

Rahm, Carl Thomassen, K. 

Rasmussen, C. -551 Titus, Ed. 

Rasmussen, R. -525 Tipp,' Joseph 

Reuter, Ernest Tolaas, K. 

Remmel, T. Tornquist, M. 

Reimann, Carl Torqusen, K. 

Rikkartsen, H. -597 Tonnesen, John 

Richard, Andreas rp,,„-_ t> tj 

Rosen, Frank L. T T T ^ ne £,£- 

Rosen, E. H. ™ John 

Rose, W. H. Unruh, Paul 



Ryberg, S. 



Vougt, C. 



Quetski, Herman S e r, ich Vv, R i- G - 
Savage, R. Wallrath, K 

Sampson, C. -2137 Wassemus, S. 



Sarin, K. 



Watts, E. K. 



Samuelsen, H. -ISOlWahlstedt, R. -778 

Schwartsloze, F. ^ a ™ p ' £• P ' 

Scherlan, R. S eb f r i °t„£u 

Scott, E. G. Westad, Johan 

Schroeder, Aug. Westerholm, A. W. 

Schieman, E. -1744 Wikhlad, Otto 

Schaffer, P. Wennick, And. 

Schoffler, A. Westin, C. O. 

Sebelin, C. Wenniche, Haldor 

Selander, J. Westbroch, Joe 

Shane, J. Wilhelm, H. 

Simmonds, A. E. Wiking, Aug. 

Sikemeyer, W. Willert, L. 

Sjoquist, G. Woadhull, C. 

Smith, Ed. Wurzbach, W. 

Smith, J. S. WulfC, M. 

Sorensen, H. -1106 York, J. 

Sohst, A. Zacko, K. 

Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Encbom, Carl R. 
Eliassen, C. E. 
Evans, Stanley 
Grew, Jorgen 
Heine, C. 
Helms, William 
Hartman. Karl 
KnopfE, Fritz 



Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, L. K. 
McLennan. Donald 
Olsen, Alfred 
Stachenssen, C 
Syvertsen, Syvaret 
Sande, Anton 
Tugland, Karl 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 



EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m. except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 

BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia ots., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonaple prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., or Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 



812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire-Latimer Block. Seattle, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713 

Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 
Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 



CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 



Principal 



Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



WHEN IN BALLARD 
Visit the 
BOSTON CLOTHING HOUSE 
E. Goddman, Prop. 
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil- 
skins, etc., etc. 




Understand 



BROTHER 
UNIONISTS 



That the best made shoes — the shoes made under the best manu- 
facturing conditions — the shoes that best stand wear — bear the Union 
Stamp, as shown herewith. 

Ask your dealer for Union Stamp shoes, and if he cannot supply 
you, write 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS* UNION, 

246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. ^^ 



£-*+ _ M jf~^. f >• w ^rx £-> See that this label (in light blue) 
%^ l^/l C 3 l^fcw I * i^t ^^^ »PP ears on tne box f rom wn ieh 



you are serred. 



Issued by Authority of uie Cigar MaKers - International Union 

Union-made Cigars, 

(JrUS fjpltifif? ll«< U» CIojm contained intW* bo* hm lam mad 

aMUIKFtOF THE OCAfl HAXEKJ 'imLRMIIOKAl MM o( AMriu. in mu 
UKUOl ol the MORALMAIOHAlmd INIEUECIUAI WlllARt Of THE (HAn. 
then Cigars to all smoker* Umnnout IK* world. 

Ml InliinqtmaflU upon ttiii Labtl wif bo pureed iccofdiftq 'olaW 



by.ndfeWoftaan, 

izrtion devoted to tf» ad 

TtartforlwOffleoraiKDl 



F«C 
**« SIMILE 






if America 



Labor News. 



A strike of Greek laborers em- 
ployed by the Southern Construction 
Company at San Diego, Cal., occurred 
recently, owing to their refusal to 
work with Mexicans. 

A general strike of boiler-makers 
on the Chicago Great Western, Great 
Northern, Northern Pacific and Soo 
railroads was called on September 14, 
and it is expected that the shops of 
the entire systems of those roads will 
be tied up. 

Thirty-eight girls employed in the 
factory of the Capital Candy Com- 
pany at Sacramento, Cal., went on 
strike on September 18. They de- 
mand a nine-hour day. They have 
been compelled to work nine and one- 
half hours. 

It was announced that several 
boiler-makers from the East have 
left St. Paul for Brainerd to reopen 
the big Northern Pacific boiler shops 
at that plant, which have been closed 
by the strikes. The strikers assert 
that the imported men are unskilled. 

A dispatch from Honolulu, T. H., 
says that the Spanish immigrants 
brought to that city some months ago 
are giving satisfaction in all parts of 
the Islands where they have gone. For 
the most part, too, they have re- 
mained on the plantations where they 
went to work first. 

A dispatch from Fall Fiver, Mass., 
says that cotton spinners who former- 
ly earned as low as $8.50 a week are 
now making $18 to $21 in the same 
time. Weavers are now earning as 
high as $18 a week, and improve- 
ments in machines have made the 
work much easier. 

An appeal signed by President 
Small, of the Telegraphers' Union, 
and President Gompers, of the Am- 
erican Federation of Labor, to organ- 
ized labor throughout the country for 
financial assistance to striking teleg- 
raphers was issued from the Federa- 
tion headquarters on September 17. 

George A. Pettibone was unable to 
appear in the District Court at Boise, 
Idaho, on September 17 to have his 
case set for trial. An affidavit of the 
attending physician states that Petti- 
bone is suffering from ulceration of 
the bladder, which, unless soon 
checked, will prove fatal. 

The Brotherhood of Engineers in 
Kansas City, Mo., asserts that as a re- 
sult of a vote recently taken, 97 per 
cent of its members on the Missouri 
Pacific railway favor a strike because 
of the company's refusal to make cer- 
tain concessions involving the round- 
housing of locomotives at the end of 
the runs. 

Operating officials of the five rail- 
ways involved in the strike of the 
boilermakers — the Great Northern, 
Northern Pacific, Chicago Great 
Western, Chicago, St. Paul, Minneap- 
olis and Omaha, and the Minneapolis, 
St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie — have 
formed an organization to meet strike 
conditions. The organization will at 
once proceed to fill the places vacat- 
ed by strikers. 

A general order issued by the War 
Department on September 17 is cal- 
culated to put an end to the long- 
drawn-out controversy between or- 
ganized labor and the Army engineers 
over the question of enforcing the 
eight-hour day on all Government 
work. The labor unions win decis- 
ively, for the new order is in the shape 
of an amendment to the Army regu- 
lations making the Eight-Hour day 
general. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 










San Francisco Letter List. 



The Czar of Russia has ordered the 
formation of a regiment of picked 
men to attend upon and protect him. 

It is semiofficially reported in Tokio 
that Viscount Aoki will be succeeded 
Embassador at Washington by 
Ban ii Kaneko. 

It is reported from London that the 
United States Navy has placed an 
order for 100,000 tons of coal with 
Welsh firms. 

An earthquake during the night of 
September 22 and 23 damaged many 
houses and churches at Guatemala. 
The coffee district was not affected. 

It is generally acknowledged that 
the second International Peace Con- 
ference, now in session at The Hague, 
will be barren of any result making 
for peace between nations. 

The total number of recruits who 
will be called out for service in the 
Russian army this year is 463,050. Of 
these the government of St. Peters 
burg will furnish a quota of 3782. 

Over 177.1)00 British and Irish emi- 
grants went to the United States and 
Canada during the past year, accord- 
ing to a British Board of Trade re- 
turn recently issued. The total is 
greater than that of any year since 
1887, 

Three revolutionists recently at- 
tacked and wounded the chief of the 
rural constabulary in his village at 
Zhitomir, Russia, and wounded six 
peasants who pursued them. The 
peasants finally caught the revolution- 
ists and lynched them. 

The British Admiralty has decided, 
i! is said, that all the vessels of the 
Dreadnought class now building shall 
be armed with eight new-type 13.5- 
inch guns, so disposed that all can be 
fired on either broadside. The new 
weapons will be over fifty feet long. 

A newspaper states that Professor 
Joly has completed a geological ex- 
amination of specimens of the strata 
collected from the borings for the 
Simplon Tunnel. He found rich 
traces of radium, indicating larger de- 
posits than any hitherto discovered in 
Europe. 

The transatlantic liner Princess Yo- 
lando was launched at Genoa, Italy, 
on September 22, but turned over and 
sank as soon as she reached the water. 
The Princess Yolando is of 10,000 
tons and 450 feet long. She is valued 
at $200,000. Divers are endeavoring 
to ascertain the extent of her damage. 

Intense indignation has been 
aroused in Belgium and England by 
King Leopold's trick of making him- 
self concessionaire of the Congo 
Crown Domain, which virtually pre- 
vents annexation of the Free State by 
Belgium. There is talk of sending a 
British fleet to blockade the mouth of 
the Congo River. 

Arrangements are rapidly progress- 
ing for the entertainment of the 
Kaiser and Empress of Germany in 
England toward the middle of Octo- 
ber. The Imperial visit is expected 
to last a week, and will be marked 
by great official and social events in 
Buckingham Palace, the Guildhall and 
Windsor Castle. 

Ratification of the Anglo-Russian 
convention took place at St. Peters- 
burg on September 23. The Anglo- 
Russian convention regulates the re- 
live interests of Great Britain and 
Russia in Thibet, Afghanistan and 
Persia. Each of the contracting 
powers agrees not to endeavor to ob- 
tain any advantage in Thibet and 
Afghanistan which might be to the 
disadvantage of the other. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 



Aarnio, John Erik 
Aasen, Alfred 
Abrahamsen, John 

iiison, Carl 
Ahlborg, R. W. 
Albrecht, Emil 
Albright, Emil 
Allen. Fred 
Allen, -14S5 
Amundson, F. A. 
Andersen. Prank 
Andersen, Oscar 
Andersen, A. S. 
Andersen, j. ivlartin 
Andersen. -1156 
Andersen, -1274 
Andersen, -1234 
Anderson, Knut 
Anderson. Cans K. 
Anderson, Albin 
Anderson, -1449 
Bade, Alex 
Ballhorn, Clir. N. 
Basberg, Ft. If. 
Bauer, Frank 
Bausback, -1511 
Baxter, W. J. 
Relin, Erik 
Bellng, i >sc-ar 
Benson, John E. 
Berg, A. C. 
Berggren, V. 
Berglund, Nils P. 
Bergstrom, Frank 
Beyerle, R. 
BJordal, Gunder 
Bjork, Algot 
Bjorkhoim, G. A. 
Bjorklund, E. S. 
Bio.iistad, N. M. 
Blind! cim, O. C. 
Bogdon, Wm. 
Caldwell, Wm. M. G. 
Canning, Jons 
Carlsen, Th. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Edvard 
Carlson, Hans 
Carlson, Conrad 
Carlsson, -1132 
Carron, Edw. 
Casey, Larry 
Christiansen, M. F. 
Christiansen, -605 
Christiansen, Bernt 
Christiansen, -545 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Ualgaard, -1042 

I am. Otto 
I'annevig, M. 
I 'avis. Fred 
He Baere, Henry 
I >empster, J. 
Dlsnhler, Feter 
Edelmann, G. 
Edler, Carl 
lOkman, Carl 
Elliott, John 
Kabricius, H. 
Fagerberg, Albin 
Panning, Chris 
Ferraris, Joseph 
Fichter, Philip 
Fleek, -1888 
Follls, Geo. 
Polts, Frank 
Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gabrielsen, C. W. 
Gad, Sophus 
Gadd, Ernst 
Gartz, Wm. 
Gibbs, Harry 
Gillholm, A. 
Gjerdahl, Soren 
i hi, loren 
Goedhoop, II. 
Gorjussen, G. T. 
Gower, John 
Greiner, R. 
Hadberg, if. 
Hagln, B. o. 
i laglund, Mr. 
Haldorsen, Adolf 
Hall, Wm. T. 
i [alvorsen, Gus 
Kalvorsen, Olaf 
Halvorsen, -595 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Halvorsen, -1418 
Halvorsen. M. 
Hana. Olaf O. 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, -1606 
Hansen. Frithjof 
Hansen, -1250 
Hansen, -1090 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, -1769 
Hansen. -1729 
Hansen, A. C. 
I lansen. L. P. 
Hansen, Hjalmar 
Hansen, -896 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hansen, -1609 
Hansen. -1906 
Harbeck, Theo. 
Harrison, John T. 
Hartmann. G. 
Hartwig, Kurt 

Isaai son, G. E. 
Isaacson, Isaac 

Jackson, C. L. 
Jacob, Ambros 
Jakobsen, -1341 
Jacobsen, -1686 
Jakobsen, N. S. 
Jakobsen, Ole 
Jamieson, Joe 
.lansen, K. 
.lansen. -944 
Jarvie, W. 
Jasperse, Jan 
.i. risen, -1618 
Jensen, Henrik 
Jensen, -1733 
Jensen, -1578 
j Jensen, -132k 
Jensen, Iver 
Jepson, Axel 

.lei sell, W. 



Anderson, -1229 

Anderson. Emil 

Anderson, Ernest 

Anderson, Simon E. 

Anderson, Henry 

Anderson, Andrew N. 

Anderson, -1447 

Anderson, F. A. 
Anderson, -1026 
Andersson, -1514 
Anderson, -1109 
Andersson, -1232 
Andersson, E. F. 
Andreasen, O. L. 
Andreasen, Mogens 
Andresen, E. L. 
Arbanen, V. E 
Arnesen, isat» 
Arntsen, Julian 
Aspen, Knut 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Bono, Viktor 
Boreng, J. F. 
Borresen, Niels 
Boss, L. A. 
1 >.strom, -643 
Brandt, Otto 
Brandt, Gus 
Braun, Wm. 
Bredesen, John 
Brenner. Ludv. 
Brose, J. A. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Brox. Henrik 
Bruce, J . 
Brumlinger, Paul 
Bryde, C. M. 
F.urkhard, Geo. 
Burmeister, S. 
Burno, Frank 
Burns, F. B. 
Byl, Jacob 
Christiansen, 

Hjalmar 
Christensen, Chr. 
Christensen M. H. 
Christensen, N. F. 
Christensen, H. K. 
Christiansen, Ferd. 
Claus, J. R. C. 
Clementz, Ole 
Cougher, Alex 
Cox, H. 
Crisp, E. 
Curtis, R. H. 

Dixon, John 
Domnisk, H. 
Donovan, L. 
Dowling, S. Q. 
i ioyle, W. 
Drager, Otto 
Dunn. C. W. 
Dunne, Joseph 
Ellsen, Fred 
Eluefr, Robt. H. 
Englund, R. 
Erlcksen, Karl H. 
Forstrom, Sivert 
Frederiksen, -532 
Freiberg, P. 
Froberg, Fred 
Frose, Elias 
Frost, Hans 
Furlong, Wm. 

Gronros, Viktor 
Grosman, R. 
Gundersen, John 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gundersen, L. S. 
Gundersen, Ole 
Gunnarsson, Geo. 
Gustavson, Robert 
Gulliksen, M. 
Guthre, Raymond 
Guthre, R. 
Guzak, B. 

Hassan, G. 
Hawkins, M. 
Hedlund, -1726 
Heesche, Heinrich 
Heicke, Paul 
Helander, H. 
Hellesto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Helstrom, Chas. 
Helmer, Fritz 
Henhusen, Peter 
Honge, Arthur 
Henrichsen, K. H. 
Henriksen, A. G. 
Henrikson, Peter 
Hermann, Helge 
Hermansen, L. 
Hermanssen, -1622 
Hill, Gus. 
Hinner, Paul 
Hirst, G. 
Hjorth, Knud 
Holm, T. W. 
Iiolste. Willv 
Holstein, R. 
Hornberg. G. P. 
Hoting. H. 
Howell, Alb. S. 
Hoyer, J. 

Hufthouse. K. J. L. 
Hull. Hendrik 
llnsby, Lars 

Isberg, E. G. 

Johansen. -1705 
Johansen, 1677 
Johansen, -1 :>:>_: 
Johansen, -1821 
Johansen, Emil 
Johanson, E. R. 
Johanson, Fred 
Johanson, Edw. 
Johanson, C. 
Johanson, -1334 
Johannesen, -1441 
Johansson. K. H. 
Johnsen. T . P. K. 
Johnsen, -1343 
Johnsen, -1300 
Johnsen, Andreas 
Johnsen, Hjalmar 
Johnson, 1300 
Johnson, -1283 



Johnson, -1834 
Johnson, John A. 
Johnson, Einar 
Johnsen, C. H. 
Johnson, -1451 
Johnson, A. A. 
Jordan, Gus. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, Emanuel 
Johnson, Ivar 

[Cahlsen, -1198 
Kalnischke, Otto 
Kane, Geo. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Karlson, Nestor 
Karlstrom, R. 
Kask, R. 
Keedel, Chas. 
Kimeral, H. 
Kirst. Hans 
Klahn, Chas. 
[Clausen, Karl 
Klemo, Alf. 
Kiesow. Paul 
Klingenberg. John 

Laakonen, J. V. 
Lagerhamm. I'. 
Lahs, John 
Laine, -441 
Laine, -1391 
Landborg. C. W. 
Lang, i 
l.ange, Fred 
Lannqvist, O. 

I.arsen. A. P. 
I.arsen, Einar A. 
I.arsen, -1290 
I.arsen. -1658 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, Karl Chr 
Larsen. -1287 
Latsching, Evald 
I. a u, Gus 
Lauritsen, Geo. 
Laws, Harry 
Lelno, Gust. 
Leishman. J. T. 
l.emmel, Chas. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lersten. J. 
Lettre, Marius 
Levsen, R. J. 
I. (wis. Walter 
Lewis, Geo 

Madsen. ThoroU 
M arisen. J. G. 
Uagnussen, Jorgen 
Mahsing. W. 
Malmgren. Wm. 
Mardisson. A. 
Martin. C. S. 
Martens. Jules 
Martinson, D. 

Mathiesen, Ludv. 

Mathews, -1740 
Mathiesen, T. L. 
Mathiesen, Harry 
Mattson. Renhold 
McArthur, L. 
MeFadden. Wm. 
McFall, Fred L. 
McGoldrick. Jas. 

Naumann. Alf. 
Nelson. G. 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nelson, M. P. 
Nelson. -906 
Nelson, -641 
Nelson, Ole 
Nesblt, T. 
NfStor. Wilson 
Nicoln. D. 
Nielsen, A. C. 
Nielsen. -754 
Nielsen, -871 
Nielsen, -973 
Nielsen, George 

Oberg, -790 
Oedekoven. Franz 
Ohlsson. Bertel 
Ohman, Aug. 
Olsen. -511 
Olsen. Pet. 
Olsen, Ole. C. 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen. -836 
Olsen, -812 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, -534 
Olsen, -966 
Olsen, Aksel 
Olsen, Albert 

r.iajinen, .lohan 
Pankhurst, Thos. 
Paul, Alex 
Paulsen, Einar 
Paulsen, -920 
Payne, R. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, John 
Petersen, Jens O. 
Pedersen, Edward 
Pedersen, Bertel 
Petersen, -920 
Pedersen, Alf. L. 
Pedersen, -1136 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pedersen, Laurits 
Persson, H. W. 
Petersen, Hans 
Petersen. -782 

Haahange. J. F. 
Rajala. Viktor 
Randolf, D. W. 
Rantanen, W. 
Rask, Hjalmar 
Kasmussen, Marcus 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Hans P. 
Raymond, M. L. 
Reese, -685 
Reilley. J. W. 
Reponen. Anton 
Reynolds, Thomas 
Klehelsen, P. 



Jorgensen, R. W. 
Jorgensen, Theo. 
Jorgensen. A. P. 
Jordt, -1737 
Juelsen, Ed. 
Juliusen, Jens 
Juliusen, Carl 
Jurgensen. Fred 
Jurgensen. Wm. 
Jury, Chas. C. 

Knudsen. Oscar 
Kofoed. Andreas 
Koop, J. F. O. 
Korneliusen. Ben 
Kosel, H. W. A. 
Knopf. Fritz 
Knudsen, Rangoald 
Krandsen, Niels 
Kreutzer, Karl 
Kristiansen. A. 
Kristophersen, Jacob 
Kragstad. E. 
Krohnert, Alb. 
Kullman, Karl 

Lewzey, Geo. 
Liliestrom, Gosta 
Land, Gus A. 
Linde, O. B. 
i.inde. Bertel 
Linrtebery, Ernst 
Llndeman. O. F. 
Lindhal, Michael 
Lindholm, A. B. 
Lindholm, Erik 
Lindholm. -1274 
Lindkvist. A. I. 
Lindman, Artur 
Lindstrom. A. John 
Lohle, Martin 
Lofman, K. 
Lokce, Allck 
Long, Harry 
Lorho, M. 
Lubeck, R. A. 
Luckman, Ewald 
Lund. J. W. 
Ltindberg, K. J. 
Lundberg, Carry 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Lundberg, Jacob 
Lundgren, A. 
Lundln, Anders 
Lungren, L. 

McLean, John 
McLeod, John A. 
Meland. Ingvalt 
Melander, C. G. 
Melart, Rolf 
Melin, Einar 
Meyer, -1648 
Meyer, Paul 
Mever. Fred 
Meyer. Frank 
Mikkelsen. A. S. 
Mikkelsen. E. C. C. 
Mikkelsen. Axel M. 
Milander, Karl 
Mills, Geo. 
Moe. John M. 
Mohle, Otto 
Mulley, Jas. 

Nielsen, Otto 
Nielsen. Fritz 
Nielsen. Sivert 
Nielsen. -717 
Nielsen, Henri 
Nilsen, Edvin 
Nilsen, H. 
Nilson. Johin 
Nilsson. Carl 
Nord. Ben. 
Nordlof. S. 
Nordstrom. Emil 
Norrman, P. W. 
Nyberg, Oscar 

Olsen. Ingval 
Olsen, Olaf S. 
Olsen. -677 
Olson, Harold 
Olson. -597 
Olson, C. 
Olson, -978 
Olson, -562 
Olson. M. P. 
Olsson, Albin 
O'Neill. F. J. 
Orchard. S. H. 
Ortiz, John 
Osen, Aksel 
Osmundsen, R. 

Petersen, -1223 
Petersen, Carl G. 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen. -709 
Petersen, -1088 
Petersen, -1164 
Petersen, Jens 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, Axel 
Petschow, W. 
Petterson, -1923 
Petrow, F. 
Pheiffer, Karl 
Pheiffer. M. 
Pietschmann. Geo. 
Pontynen, -1054 
Porrier. S. J. 
Prinz. Chas. 
Probst, R. 

Richter, -756 
Rlntzo, John 
Rono, Victor 
Rosbeck, Gus 
Roscheck, Paul 
Rosengreen, A. 
Rosengren. Frans 
Rosenholm, O. 
Rosenstrom, Frank 
Roth. Svend T. 
Rottol. A. S. 
Rudberg. C. 
Ryden, A. Oskar 



Saari, K. G. 
Sanders, Frank 
Sarten, Chris 
Sauer, Emil 
Schelenz, Hans 
Schmalkuche, Fr. 
Schmidt, H. 
Schmuhl, Wm. 
Scholz, -1888 
Selm Us, Albert 
Schroeder. Freu 
Schuler. Ed. 
Schultz, Albert 
Scott, Emil G. 
Selander. G. 
Selander, W. 
Sellen, Geo. 
Sexon, Chas. 
Staemmler, Hugo 
Stange, Anton 
Stangeland, O. B. 
Stein. G. 
Stervik. Ingvald 
Straehle, Karl 
Strokark, Paul 
Suikow, Franz 
Stone, S. W. 
Sundberg, Conrad 

Taylor, Jas. W. 
Teigland, Knudt 
Tennant, Thomas 
Tergesen, Tom 
1 liompsen, Th. 
Thorman, H. 
Throndsen, Hans 
Thorne, Gus 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thornton, Boyce 
Thorsen, Johan 
Thoresen, Petter 
1 horsen. Torger 
Tiller, J. 

Udbye, Harold 

Vesterman, F. 
Vidot, Wm. 
Vongehr, Ewald 

Wagner, Claude 
Wahlers, W. 
Wahlstedt, -778 
Wahlum, Gus. O. 
Wallace, Geo. 
Wasenius, S. 
Wehde, Fritz 
Werner, Paul 
Westerman, Jacob 
Westin, John 
Wieehmann, Aug. 
Wilde, Herman 



Shawl, W. M. 
Slkowski, A. 
Simpson. Lewis C. 
Simonsen, Fred 
Slmonsen, G. 
Sjogren, -330 
Siewertsen, Martin 
Skold, C. A. 
Smith, J. S. 
Smith, John A. 
Smith, John V. 
Sodergren, -1972 
Soderman, M. 
Sorensen. -1822 
Soto, Pedro 
Speer, Kurt 
Spin, Knud A. 
Stremmel, Harry 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundkvist, Chas. 
Svansen, Andrew 
Svendsen, -1903 
Svensen, Anker 
Svensson, -1188 • 
Swanson, -1386 
Swensen, Otto 
Swensen, 1 Litis M. 
Swenson, -1932 

Todal, M. E. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Tollefsen, A. 
Torkllsen, Marius 
Torvig Olaf 
Torvig, Olaf 
Freder, Eugene 
Trendl, Ludv. 
Turn Rudolf 
Tuominen, A. 
Turner, Willy 
Turner, M. A. 
Turner, Ted 

l.'rsin, Kasper. 

Von Versen, E. 
Vortman, Wm. 
Vucic. V. 

Wikman. Peter 
Wlllmann, W. 
Winkel, A. 
Wlscheropp, Fred 
Woker, Herman 
Wold. S. 
Wold. Haakon 
Wren, Mr. 
Wulff, Martin 
Wurzbach, -941 
Wychgel, -970 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Sam 
Albertsen, F. 

Ahlquist, A. 
Armstrong, Fr. 

Anderson, G. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, -1235 
Antindsen, O. 
Bowman, C. 
Bailei, W. 
Bjurk, A. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Budenditsh, G. 
Benson, C. 
Himense, Y. 
Danberg, R. 
Dupon, J. 
1 'ahldorf, D. 
Easton, R. W. 
Eliason. E. 
Ldelman, G. 
Planning, K. 
Fox. E. J. 
Flathead, C. 
Guthrie, R. 
Gullacsen, H. 
Gjerund, B. 
Gismervid. C. J. 
Hansen, C. B. 
Holmstrom, Ch. 
Hawkins, M. 
Henriekson. M. 
Heart, Ch. 
Harbeck, Th. 
Hanson, G. 
Jensen, G. L. 
Johannesen, H. 
.isaaksen, G. 
Josephsen, F. 
Joransson, P. J. 
Johnson, -1451 
Klintbom, M. 
Knudsen, H., -419 
Ketola, II. 
King. J. A. 
Lundin, A. 
Lauritson, G. 
Lampo, N. 
Lundblad, E. 
Lunde. O. 
Ludlow, J. 
Maibohm, H. 
Mortensen, Wm. 
Miller, J. 
N\ strom, E. 
Nordman, V. 
Nielsen, A. 
Nelson, -906 
Olsen, E., -515 
Olsen, J. 
Prager. H. 
Poison, J. 
Pedersen, N. C. 
Porter, Ch. 
Palmroth, C. E. 
Roy, J. A. 
Svensen, B. 
Squires, J. 
Simonsen, F. 
Smith, C. 
lurnquist, E. 
Wikblad, Otto 
Wells. L. 



Aasprong, G. 
Andersen, A.. -853 
Anderson, John 
Arnold, Er. 
Andersen, A., -1057 
Anderson, C. 
Almeida, J. C. 

Bartholomew, W. 
Brander, W. 
Brucklond, E. 

Boe. D. 

1 uttgereit, L. 

Deising, E. 
Dittmeier, C. 
Dream, Joe 
De Groot, J. 
Emanuelson, A. 
Erickson, M. 

Fuchs, J. 
Forstrom, O. 

Gasman, G. 

Gundersen, O. 
Goddard, M. 
Qraugard, L. 
Haaland, J. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubenette. J. 
Hervig, J. 
Holten, O. J. 
Hicks. J. 

Johnson, Car! 
Jorgensen, J. P. 
Johansson, -1518 
Jensen, J. M. 
Jansen, J., -1555 

Kalsen, C. 
Koso, P. 
Klover, H, -463 

Lomquist, O. 
Lundin, C. 
Littorin, B. 
Lehtonen. W. 
Larsen, E. A. 
Larsn, K. J. 
Mulley, J. 
Melland, O. 

Nilsen, Ed. 
Nyman, A. 
Nystrom. R. 

Olsson, Johan 

Peed, J. 
Perkins, D. 
Pierson, A. 
Passon, B. 

Rislaksen, O. 
Swanson, J. 
Svensson, S. 
Swanne, II. 
Schmidt. Fr. 
Thogersen, T. 
Waring, H. 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Between King and Berry Streets, San Francisco. 

GENTS', BOYS', AND YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats. Caps. Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price, give us a call. do 
not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

509 Golden Qate Ave., Cor. Polk. 

Phone Market 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



SULLIVAN'S SHOES 

(Established 30 years.) 



For 

SEAMEN'S 
Use 




Union 

Made and 

Strong • 

MARKET STREET near 8th 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Sur- 
plus % 2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in 
cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 38,156,931.28 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Bmil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



DON'T WAIT FOR YOUR SHIP 
TO COME IN, 

But Begin Now to Save. 

$2.00 is enough to start with, then 
every opportunity, deposit your spare 
change. 

Your account will grow rapidly and 
you will be encouraged — ere you know 
it you will have a snug sum laid by. 

You will not only have what you 
save, but we will make what you save 
earn 3 l / 2 %, compounded semi-annual- 
ly. 

We are open Saturday evenings. 

The Market Street Bank 

Market and Seventh Sts. 

Open Saturday afternoons and 
evenings. 

Safe deposit boxes $2.50 a year and up. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411, San Francisco] 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 



JOHN REGNIER 

EXPRESSING 

Stand, 44-46 East Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 
CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



CAPT. CHRISTEINSEIN 

( POLORES 
Inventor of CHRISTENSEN'S \ SOLAR AZIMUTH COMPASS 

( DISTANCE FINDER 
Has opened a School of Navigation at 82 MARKET STREET, ROOM 22, 
where practical navigation for passing U. S. examinations for steam and sail 
will be taught. 

Terms on application. 




Domestic and Naval. 



CHARLES LYONS of London 



IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

SUITS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

OVERCOATS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

TROUSERS TO ORDER FROM $5.00 UP 

731VANNESS AVE! f SAN FRANCISCO 95S BROADWAY. OAKLAND 



Established 1866 




United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Room 3 



J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters 
Boss of the Road and Can't Bust 'Em Overalls, 75 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR WALK OVER SHOES 




Established 1877 



VON SHOEN'S 

Navigation 
School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE, 
Steuart St. - - - Near Folsom 

Masters, Mates, Pilots and Engineers prepared to pass EXAMINA- 
TION for United States License. 

SHIPS' COMPASSES ADJUSTED. 

Bedrooms in the Institute $6 and $8 per month. Baths. Officers' 

Sitting Room. 



Elaborate and beautiful ceremonies 
marked the observance of Robert Ful- 
ton Day at the Jamestown Exposi- 
tion on September 23. 

The Philadelphia-New Orleans line 
project, which is being strongly ar- 
gued by merchants of the Crescent 
City, is receiving careful consideration 
by the Philadelphia Trades League. 

For the first time in the history of 
ocean travel the police of New York 
City and the transatlantic steamship 
companies have united in a war on the 
gamblers who ply their trade on the 
ocean liners. 

The heaviest gale reported in forty 
years swept the Newfoundland coast 
on September 19. Eleven fishing 
schooners and ships were driven 
ashore at various points or foundered 
at their moorings. 

Should the investigation of agents 
sent to South America by Philadelphia 
capitalists prove that the undertaking 
is feasible, a direct steamship line will 
be inaugurated shortly between the 
former port and Brazil. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 124 vessels of 57,205 gross tons 
were built in' the United States during 
August, 1907. The largest steam ves- 
sel included in these figures is the 
William M. Mills, of 7962 gross tons, 
built for the Weston Transit Com- 
pany. 

Captain George B. Hunter, of Dela- 
ware, has sold to Captain Charles E. 
Risley, formerly of the schooner Paul 
Palmer, the Philadelphia schooner 
Madeline Cooney, formerly in the 
coasting coal and lumber trade. Cap- 
tain Risley will take command of the 
Cooney. 

Engineers employed by the Mer- 
chants and Miners' Transportation 
Company have virtually assured their 
employers that they would ignore the 
order of the Marine Engineers' Union 
and would not insist on the enforce- 
ment of a higher wage scale after 
October 1. 

Secretary of the Navy Metcalf has 
awarded the contract for the construc- 
tion of five torpedo boat destroyers, 
provision for which was made by the 
last Congress, to the Cramps, Bath 
Iron Works and New York Shipbuild- 
ing Company. Turbine engines of 
the Parsons type are to be installed 
in the boats. 

The schooner Decorra, from New 
York for Eastport with coal, which 
was abandoned by her crew of six 
men in the Bay of Fundy on Septem- 
ber 6 in a sinking condition, has been 
stripped of her stores, ropes and fit- 
tings, presumably by wreckers. By 
order of the receiver of wrecks the 
vessel has been stripped of her sails. 

Preparations for the defense of the 
America's Cup have begun by the 
New York Yacht Club. At least one 
syndicate is being organized to build 
a yacht to defend the trophy and 
there may be a second, perhaps more. 
There seems to be only one opinion 
as to the management of the de- 
fender. Every one appears to agree 
that it will be vested in E. D. Mor- 
gan. 

That New York shippers realize the 
possibilities of commercial relations 
with ports in South America was 
shown recently in the announcement 
of an additional line of steamships to 
the west coast, which will make Val- 
paraiso, Iquique, Callao and other 
large ports along the Coast its des- 
tination. The line will be opened 
with a six weeks' service, with the 
operation of six vessels. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



At the Intelligence Office. — '"I want 
a plain cook." 

"Well, you'll find plenty here. This 
ain't no beauty show." — Baltimore 

American. 



She Wanted to Know. — He — 
"Brains are not needed to win suc- 
111 these days." 

She — "Is that an acknowledgment 
or a boast?" — Chicago Record-Herald. 



Miss Screecher — "I am saddest 
when I sing." 

Mr. Collier Down (absently) — "I 
should think you would be." — Brook 
lyn Eagle. 



A Hint. — Sandy — "Don't you love 
to hear the music of those bells com- 
ing over the water?" 

Mandy — "Yes, I adore anything that 
has a ring connected with it." — Chi- 
cago News.. 



The Truth of It. — She — "I always 
think of motoring as the poetry of 
motion." 

He — "Yes, until the machine breaks 
down. Then it becomes blank verse." 
—Puck. 



Sleeping in a Church. — -Rector 
(showing a stranger the church mon- 
uments) — "My grandfather has slept 
in this church for eighty years." 

Stranger — "Is he living?" — -Yonkers 
Statesman. 



Not a Disbeliever. — "I suppose," re- 
marked the dear girl, "that you do not 
believe in love at first sight?" 

"Oh, yes, I do," rejoined the old 
bachelor. "If men were gifted with 
second sight they would never fall in 
love." — Home Magazine. 



All the Leading Brands 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 
/. 5. U. of A. Button* For Salt 

GUS. HOLMGREN 

154 EAST ST. San Francisco 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



LVNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

530 HAIGHT ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 
JOHNJ.BAGLEY&CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturer! 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 



-<o Issued Sjn ieAiitl nnty ol the <^>- og 
IT0UODWWMIU>geWfcklHTERNftTl()NAL I UIVIOIN 

&rr™&2 ^^J^atl MADE 




A $20 Suit 
for $15 



Every retail clothier, as you 
know, buys of the wholesalers 
or manufacturers except S. N. 
WOOD C& CO. We are manu- 
facturers and sell direct to you. 

If you buy a suit here you may 
save that profit which the retailer 
is compelled to make. In short, 
you buy for the same price as any 
retail clothier pays. 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 



UPTOWN STORE 



DOWNTOWN STORE 



OAKLAND STORE 



Fillmore and Ellis Sts. 730 Market St. Washington and 11th Sts. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 
THE MERCHANTS r NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON SA VINGS DEPOSITS 

Authorized Capital $ 800,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 360,000 

Total Assets 2,200,000 

Money forwarded to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CHAS. NELSON, President. HENRY WILSON. 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President. ALBERT SUTTON. 

L. M. MacDONALD, Cashier. MARTIN SANDERS. 

J. C. ESCHEN. W. H. LITTLE. 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 
AGENTS FOR 
STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 
UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 
HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 
FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 
No. 4 M1SSIOIN ST., near East, SAIN FRANCISCO 




SORENSEN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

For lO Years 6th and Mission Sts. 



715 MARKET STREET. Near Third 
1255 FULTON STREET. Near DevUadero 
2593 MISSION STREET. Cor. 22nd Street 



THREE STORES 

Phone Connections for all Stores 



JAMES A. SORENSEN 

PRtS. AND TREAS. 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



22K, 18K AND 14K WEDDING RINGS IN STOCK 



%: 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1889 

Temporary Address, No. 775 Twenty-Second Street. 
Via Key Route. OAKLAND, CAL. 

This well-known school will occupy modern apartments and be fitted 
with all modern nautical appliances. Watch this paper for a special notice. 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 

Tin-; 

United States Nautical College. 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD - Principal 

The oldest navigation Bchool on the 
Pacific Coast (established 1875) offers you 
advantages that can not be obtained else- 
n here. 

Our methods are short, thorough, con- 
cise and practical; the pi Ices are ni 
ate. and you are assured of a "square 
deal." 

Terms on Application. 

Sailors' Home. San Francisco. 



ISSUED BY AUTHORITY Or 




Union Made 

Pants 
2.00 to 5.00 

With a guarantee of a new 
pair free if they don't wear 

Wallenstein & Frost 

VAN NESS AND GOLDEN GATE AVES. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

W. L Douglas 

SHOES 

ALL STYLES AT THE 

Union Outfitting Co. 

Complete Men's Outfitters From 

Top to Bottom. 

26 EAST STREET 

BETWEEN MARKET AND MISSION. 



$100 

or more can be safely invested by 
placing monthly savings in small 
amounts so that they will bring 
large returns individually and al- 
low the 

Wage Earners 

of San Francisco to take part in 
supplying funds to rebuild the city. 

For particulars address: 

SAN FRANCISCO BOND and 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

30 MONTGOMERY STREET 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANITAC TURtRS 
133 Hartford St., S. r. 

THE NATIONAL. 
WANTED— 150 men to sleep in 
our new and clean beds; 25 and 50 
cents per night. 217 East street, 
between Washington and Jackson 
streets, San Francisco. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXI, No. 3. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1907. 


Whole No. 1043. 





TAFT AND THE INJUNCTION. 



SINCE the announcement that Secretary Wm. 
H. Taft is an avowed aspirant for the 
Presidential nomination, it has been ar- 
ranged that he should deliver a number of ad- 
dresses on his way westward, making a visit to 
the Philippines, Japan, and China, and do such 
"other things" as will tend to further his aspira- 
tion. He recently delivered the first formal ad- 
dress at Columbus, Ohio, and then at different 
points, reaching Oklahoma City, and thence to 
Seattle. In each speech he discussed several im- 
portant questions of general or local character. In 
the last few addresses he devoted considerable 
of His time and attention to the subject of in- 
junctions, and to this we desire to call especial 
attention. 

One of the reasons which he gave for advising 
the people of Oklahoma to reject the Constitution 
was that, in his opinion, it contained a bad and 
dangerous limitation upon the power of the courts 
to grant and enforce writs of injunction. Mr. 
Taft, it appears, was very "strong" and "out- 
spoken" in his handling of this question. 

The injunction, he declared, was one of the 
most valuable, beneficent, and essential instru- 
ments of law and justice. It was even more neces- 
sary for the protection of the poor than of the 
rich, and to limit it in any way would put more 
power in the hands of rich criminals and op- 
pressors. 

The provision to which he so seriously objected 
did not, however, limit the power to issue injunc- 
tions. It only limited the power of judges to 
punish alleged violators of injunctions, to send 
them to prison for alleged contempt of court with- 
out trial by jury. It is to the intervention of a 
jury between the injunction and the sentence for 
contempt that the Secretary took exception. 

It does not appear that he was in a humorous 
mood. He seemed wholly in earnest, he argued 
that it is essential to the protection of the poor 
man that judges should have the power to find 
men guilty of contempt and give them prison 
sentences without referring the facts of the case 
to a jury of the defendant's peers. 

Now, we do not think it necessary to enter into 
any prolonged controversy with Mr. Taft on this 
point. Organized labor is quite competent to 
judge how much the power of judges to declare 
men guilty of contempt and condemn them to im- 
prisonment has, in the past, benefited the poor 
man or is likely to benefit him in the future. The 
idea that the rich would derive advantage from 
the limitation of this power suggested by the 
Oklahomans (a limitation made necessary by the 
developments of the last 10 or 12 years) will ap- 
pear to all intelligent workmen as a solemn joke — 
which it is. 

The argument, however, becomes interesting in 
connection with Mr. Taft's aspirations in the 
political field. It shows that he has not changed 
his position since his campaign in Congressman 
Littlefield's district last year. Now, as then, he 
ignores all the fundamental and vital objections 
to the abuse. of the injunction and the consequent 
abolition of trial by jury in labor cases. He still 
seeks to evade the issue, to find sophistical reasons 
for upholding a monstrous abuse. He has learned 
nothing and forgotten nothing on the suhject since 
his career as a judge of the Federal Circuit Court. 



He was one of the early injunction judges, and as 
statesman and politician he is evidently deter- 
mined to defend his record. 

Even when he was a judge of an inferior Ohio 
court — the Superior Court of Cincinnati — he ren- 
dered a sweeping decision denying the legality of 
a perfectly peaceable boycott of what has been 
called the "secondary" kind. A union had de- 
clared a boycott against a certain firm for good, 
sufficient, and admittedly legal reasons. When 
other firms, upon request, refused to stop dealing 
with the boycotted employer, the latter in turn 
were quietly and peacefully boycotted. Judge 
Taft not only declared that men had no right to 
institute such "secondary" boycotts — that is, to re- 
fuse to give their patronage to firms dealing with 
their enemies — but he indulged at some length in 
reflections and dicta which implied that even 
"primary" boycotts, no matter how peaceable, are 
illegal when they are the result of combination 
and are intended to "coerce" the persons boy- 
cotted. The opinion contained some glittering 
generalities about the right to organize and to 
strike, even in large numbers and for "doubtful" 
reasons, but it held that unions which declare and 
maintain boycotts, even of the primary order, be- 
come malicious and oppressive combinations, dan- 
gerous to the peace and well-being of the com- 
munity. In other words, men who quietly trade 
with those who are friendly to them, and who 
refrain from patronizing, and ask their friends to 
refrain from patronizing, those who are hostile to 
them, directly or indirectly, are malicious dis- 
turbers of order and liable to punishment. 

An apologist tells us that Judge Taft did not 
make the law, but only declared and applied it, in 
rendering this radical decision. Yet the same 
apologist admits that "the case has been a leading 
one" ever since, and that Judge Taft "brilliantly 
applied old principles to new situations." The dis- 
tinction between judicial legislation and making 
novel or brilliant applications of old principles, 
and thus establishing precedents — is about as sub- 
stantial as that between tweedledee and tweedle- 
dum. 

As judge of the Federal Circuit Court, Taft had 
to deal with some far-reaching injunction and 
contempt cases. In the Toledo and Ann Arbor rail- 
road case he decided that the locomotive engineers 
of certain roads had no legal right to refuse to 
handle the freight of another road that was in- 
volved in a strike and employing non-union labor. 
Though, he said, the relation between the roads 
and the engineers was one of free contract, and 
the latter might strike for any reason, they could 
not, while holding their positions, discriminate 
in the handling of freight. A refusal Jo handle 
certain freight would amount to a violation of the 
Interstate Commerce law and a conspiracy 
against the Government, as well as against the 
railroads employing them. This decision com- 
pelled the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers 
to abrogate one of its rules and change what it 
believed to be a perfectly legal method. 

In the Phelan contempt case of 1894 Judge Taft 
decided that a union official had no right to "in- 
cite" a peaceable strike among the employes of a 
railroad in order to help striking employes of 
another road or carrier. Phelan was adjudged 
guilty of contempt for violation of an omnibus 
injunction against "interference" with a certain 
railroad. If he had urged the men to strike for 
higher wages, the judge held, he would have been 



within his rights; but as he had urged a purely 
sympathetic strike, he had committed a crime, for 
a sympathetic strike was a boycott, and a sympa- 
thetic boycott was a conspiracy. This case has 
also been "a leading one" and has often been cited 
by anti-labor attorneys seeking injunctions against 
sympathetic strikes and peaceful boycotts. 

The opinion of Judge Taft contained some ex- 
pressions that were favorable to organization and 
to "selfish" strikes; but these were not, and have 
not been, of any value. It is too late in the day 
to attempt to make all strikes criminal or to pro- 
hibit combinations of labor. What the militant 
plutocrats now want is the outlawing not only 
of sympathetic but all strikes under any circum- 
stances and of all boycotts, direct or indirect, 
primary or secondary. The Taft decisions have 
furnished them with ammunition and weapons. 

Secretary Taft is not above seeking to influence. 
Congress adversely on pending legislation de- 
manded by labor. He has nothing to say with 
reference to any measure aimed, or rather that 
should be aimed at corporate extortion and other 
ills that afflict the people. The fear that the 
power of the courts may be curtailed in their 
attempt to usurp legislative powers and paralyze 
labor in any dispute with capital (with the labor 
side absent and unheard) appears to be next his 
heart, or on his nerves. 

After the expression of a superficial and erron- 
eous view as to what should, and what should 
not, constitute property, he says: 

"So you see Mr. Gompers' proposition lacks jus- 
tice at the foundation. See what the effect would 
be. It would make a favored class of wrongdoers 
among the workingmen." 

So that labor's position on the subject of the 
injunction abuse may be clearly understood, we 
set forth some of the fundamental principles of 
equity upon which labor bases its claims. 

The writ of injunction was intended to De exer- 
cised for the protection of property rights only. 

He who would seek its aid must come into 
court with clean hands. 

There must be no other adequate remedy at law. 

It must never be used to curtail personal rights. 

It must not be used ever in an effort to punish 
crime. 

It must not be used as a means to set aside 
trial by jury. 

We protest against the discrimination of the 
courts against the laboring men of our country 
which deprives them of their constitutional guar- 
antee of equality before the law. 

The injunctions which the courts issue against 
labor arc supposed by them to be good enough 
law to-day, when there exists a dispute between 
workmen and their employers; but it is not good 
law, in fact, is not law at all, tomorrow or next 
day when no such dispute exists. 

Injunctions as issued against workmen arc 
never used or issued against any other citizen of 
our country. 

It is an attempt to deprive citizens of our 
country, when these citizens are workmen, of the 
right of trial by jury. 

It is an effort to fasten an offense on them 
when they are innocent of any wrongdoing. 

It is an indirect assertion of a property right in 

men when these men are workmen engaged in a 

lawful effort to protect or advance their natural 

rights and interests. Injunctions as issued in 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



OLD BILL. 



Old Bill, as he was familiarly called by 
the boys when discussing — or "cussing" — 
his peculiarities among themselves, was 
what, in the vernacular of the forecastle is 
known as "a cure" — "a bloomin' old bug- 
house," some of the more inconsiderate 
ones dubbed him, but this opinion I am 
hardly prepared to indorse. His official 
appellation, by the way, was "Air. Wal- 
lace"; and this fact, coupled with just the 
faintest trace of broadness in his accent, 
was, I suppose, responsible for the gener- 
ally current impression that he had first 
seen the light of day in the "Land o' Cakes." 
I say "impression," because no one had 
ever been known to become intimate 
enough with Old Bill to find out anything 
about his antecedents from himself. "Cock- 
ney" Bob and "Buck Frenchy," who had 
sailed with him off and on during many 
years, told us that they had heard a rumor 
years ago to the effect that he had been 
jilted by the young daughter of a ship- 
owner in whose employ he then was; but 
this, as I said, being only a rumor, which 
I have never succeeded in having con- 
firmed, I give it here merely for what it 
may be worth to some reader of the Jour- 
nal, who, perchance, may have known Old 
Bill in days when the adjective "old" 
didn't fit him quite as well as it did when 
I sailed with him. 

And, in good sooth, he was a strange 
creature when looked at from the view- 
point of the average here-to-day-and-there- 
to-morrow sailor. Twenty years he had 
sailed as second-mate of the bark 'Nellie 
Hawkins, and in all that time he had never 
absented himself from her more than an 
hour or so each trip for the purpose of re- 
plenishing his sea-stock. When the vessel 
came home after having completed a voy- 
age, and all the rest of the crew were paid 
off and sent ashore, Old Bill always re- 
mained on board and "kept ship." When 
she went into the graving dock to be cop- 
pered and otherwise refitted, he it was who 
personally saw to it that no leak was over- 
looked by the caulkers, or dent left un- 
touched by the carpenters. When the 
riggers were busy with her tophamper his 
experienced eye followed them everywhere, 
suggesting here and lending a hand there; 
and it's a matter of record that as long as 
he sailed in her scamp work and the Nellie 
Hawkins never came even within bowing 
acquaintance of one another. At sea he 
fussed around the deck all day, and it was 
quite generally believed that if he slept at 
all he did so with both ears cocked and 
only one eye shut. At any rate, no one had 
ever caught him asleep, for even before the 
last note of eight bells had ceased to rever- 
berate upon the night air "Mr. Wallace" 
would invariably be found on deck, either 
peering up at the sails or else into the bin- 
nacle to ascertain how she was heading. 
In short, if he had vowed to cling to the 
Nellie Hawkins "for better or for worse, 
in sickness and in health, until death do us 
part," etc., he could not have been more 
concerned about her goings on than he 
was. It was related of him that on one oc- 
casion, when the vessel's cargo of coal got 
on fire from spontaneous combustion, and 
she was towed into a near-by port and 
there scuttled to save her from total de- 
struction, he camped all alone for nigh 



on two weeks in a rude hut built by himself 
on top of the cabin, although it was mid- 
winter and bitterly cold and the swash of 
the tide at high water frequently threat- 
ened to wash him off his perch. Just why 
he was never promoted by the owners for 
this and hundreds of other proofs of faith- 
fulness to their interests can only be ex 
plained on the hypothesis that though the 
bird in the hand may be worth two in the 
bush, yet the latter are always more alluring 
because more uncertain. Men never waste 
bait on the fish they have already caught. 
And so it is just possible that if Old Bill 
had been more of a kicker and less of the 
"thou good and faithful servant" sort of 
worker his official appellation might event- 
ually have been changed from plain "Mr." to 
"Captain" Wallace. All of which but 
serves to point that paradoxical but, alas, 
ever true moral : Be good and you'll be 
lonely. 

In appearance Old Bill was tall and 
spare-built, with a dour, saturnine counte- 
nance that had never within the memory of 
living shipmate been lit up by a smile. Its 
chief features were a pair of deep-set blue 
eyes under bushy brows, a heavy, grizzled, 
sandy beard, and a nose, Roman in shape, 
but almost Cyrano de Bergerackian in size. 
For the rest he was nearly bald, slightly 
stoop-shouldered, with a decided list to star- 
board in his anatomy, caused, it was said, 
by a badly set leg that had been broken by 
a spare topmast which had gotten adrift in 
a hard gale off the Horn. His voice, though 
low and more or less indistinct when 
keyed to a merely conversational pitch, 
had yet great carrying power ; and it was a 
blowy day, indeed, when Old Bill could not 
make himself heard all over the ship from 
the royal yard down. This one faculty 
probably served more than any other to be- 
get him respect, for few things so exasper- 
ate a sailorman when he is aloft as to have 
to come down on deck for nothing but to 
find out what the mate is trying to tell him. 

In his ways Old Bill was set pretty much 
the same as all other seasoned old seadogs, 
only a little more pronouncedly so. His 
pet aversion was "Irish pennants," and 
whenever one of these was sighted stream- 
ing in the breeze all work was stopped un- 
til the offending object had been cut off 
and stowed away in the shaking barrel. 
His favorite breakfast dish was oatmeal 
porridge — "Scotch pastry," the captain 
called it — and he rated salt horse and 
pickled pork the two most toothsome meats 
in existence, barring none. "Blackball pie" 
came next in his estimation. Grog he 
never drank, but he liked his tobacco. He 
was a past master in the art of keeping the 
sailors going at some kind of work or other. 
When the vessel was homeward bound, and 
was painted, scraped, varnished, tarred and 
rattled down, holystoned, etc., and it 
seemed as though there couldn't possibly 
be anything more for anyone to do, Old Bill 
always had a card up his sleeve that took 
the trick every time. This card consisted 
of sundry short lengths of an old mooring 
chain coiled away down in the fore peak. 
This old junk he would make the men 
haul up on deck, chip the rust off it, and 
paint it with red lead. Our turn at this 
job came one hot, sweltering day, shortly 
after we had lost the Northeast Trades and 
were rolling about becalmed on the glassy, 
weed-bedecked swell of the Saragossa Sea. 



Nothing is so prone to make an old sailor 
growl as the doing of what he thinks is 
unnecessary work, and so, what with the 
heat and the calm, I wasn't greatly sur- 
prised when, presently, I heard "Cockney" 
Bob blurt out: 

"Gawd bli'me, Mr. Wallace, this 'ere is 
the fifth or sixth voyage, Hi don't know 
which, that Hi ham chipping the rust hoff 
this bloomin' chain, han' Hi knows hit will 
never be used -for hanythink. Why the 
bloody 'el don't you chuck the blawsted 
thing hoverboard han' be done with it?" 

".My boy," replied Old Bill gravely, "al- 
ways keep a thing you seemingly may have 
no use for for seven years — and then some 
more — before you throw it away. You can 
never tell when you may need it." 

This advice of Old Bill became a sort of 
standing joke with us fellows forward. 
Whenever a chap was on the point of 
throwing anything, however worthless, 
overboard, some one would be sure to 
holler: 

"Hey, 'vast heaving there, mate ; keep 
that thing seven years — and then some 
more ; you can never tell," etc. 

Well, we kept a-hammering at that blessed 
old chain every day after that, and if noth- 
ing had happened we would surely have 
been at the job yet at the rate we were put- 
ting in our licks. But something did hap- 
pen; something always does happen — es- 
pecially in stories. 

( >ne Sunday morning the news was 
passed forward, via the "doctor," that Old 
Bill had complained to the captain ct "feel- 
ing poorly," and that the captain had given 
him some sort of physic and ordered him 
to his bunk. Anyway, the old man stood 
his own watch on that day, and for many 
days after. Toward the middle of the 
week it was rumored forward that Old Bill 
was getting worse. The captain, so it was 
said, had diagnosed his malady as a compli- 
cation of several diseases, the whole find- 
ing expression in a strong fever, attended 
with occasional spells of delirium. He 
remained in this condition until Saturday 
night, when he became unconscious. By 
now every one on board was prepared for 
the worst, and when the news was given out 
on Sunday morning that Old Bill had 
slipped his moorings for the Great Beyond 
in the early hours of the morning watch we 
felt almost a sense of relief that it was all 
over. After breakfast we were mustered 
aft to carry the body up on deck, where it 
was laid out on an improvised bier at the 
break of the poop and covered with tar- 
paulin. 

On Monday morning bright and early 
"Cockney" Bob and I were detailed to get 
the corpse ready for burial. The mate 
handed us a small bolt of canvas, twine 
and palm and needle and told us to go 
ahead and make the shroud. While I was 
whetting my knife preparatory to cutting 
the canvas, "Cockney" Bob measured the 
corpse so as to get a sort of idea of the 
length of shroud needed. In doing so he 
noticed a tiny blue ribbon around the dead 
man's neck, to the end of which, tucked 
away beneath the bosom of the undershirt, 
was attached a small oiled-silk pouch. 
Opening it he drew forth from it a photo- 
graph carefully wrapped in several layers 
of fine tissue paper. After unwinding the 
tissue paper he looked at the picture long 

(Continued on page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




On the Atlantic Coast, 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions) 




RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. 



In their annual reports to the Interstate 
Commerce Commission, carriers include re- 
turns for all casualties to passengers, em- 
ployes, trespassers, and other persons. The 
following figures therefore are not compar- 
able with details in the Commission's Ac- 
cident Bulletins, based on monthly reports, 
that chiefly relate to casualties to passengers 
and to employes while on duty on or about 
trains : 

The total number of casualties to persons 
on the railways for the year ending June 
30, 1906, was 108,324, of which 10,618 repre- 
sented the number of persons killed and 
97,706 the number injured. Casualties oc- 
curred among three general classes of rail- 
way employes, as follows: Trainmen, 2,310 
killed and 34,989 injured; switch tenders, 
crossing tenders, and watchmen, 147 killed, 
1,026 injured; other employes, 1,472 killed, 
40,686 injured. The casualties to employes 
coupling and uncoupling cars were : Em- 
ployes killed, 298; injured, 3,884. The cas- 
ualties connected with coupling and uncoup- 
ling cars are assigned as follows : Train- 
men killed, 266; injured, 3,590; switch ten- 
ders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 
18; injured, 170; other employes killed, 14; 
injured, 124. 

The casualties due to falling trom trains, 
locomotives, or cars in motion were : Train- 
men killed, 454; injured, 5,215; switch ten- 
ders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 
7; injured, 159; other employes killed, 84; in- 
jured 712. The casualties due to jumping on 
or off trains, locomotives, or cars in motion 
were: Trainmen killed, 130; injured, 4,809; 
switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watch- 
men killed, 7; injured, 119; other employes 
killed, 76; injured, 685. The casualties to 
the same three classes of employes in conse- 
quence of collisions and derailments were: 
Trainmen killed, 693 ; injured, 5,245 ; switch 
tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen 
killed, 3; injured, 69; other employes killed, 
91 ; injured, 888. 

The number of passengers killed in the 
course of the year 1906 was 359 and the 
number injured 10,764. In the previous year 
537 passengers were killed and 10,457 in- 
jured. There were 146 passengers killed and 
6,053 injured because of collisions and de- 
railments. The total number of persons oth- 
er than employes and passengers killed was 
6,330; injured, 10,241. These figures include 
the casualties to persons trespassing, of 
whom 5,381 were killed and 5,927 were in- 
jured. The total number of casualties to 
persons other than employes from being 
struck by trains, locomotives, or cars was 
5,127 killed and 4,905 injured. The casual- 
ties of this class were : At highway cross- 
ings, passengers killed, 3; injured, 8; other 
persons killed, 926; injured, 1,884; at sta- 
tions, passengers killed, 48; injured, 96; oth- 
er persons killed, 566; injured, 647; at other 
points along track, passengers killed, 3 ; in- 
jured, 16; other persons killed, 3,581; in- 
jured, 2,254. The ratios of casualties indi- 
ctae that 1 employe in every 387 was killed 
and 1 employe in every 20 was injured. With 
regard to trainmen — that is, enginemen, 
firemen, conductors, and other trainmen — it 



appears that 1 trainman was killed for every 
124 employed and 1 was injured for every 8 
employed. 

In 1906, 1 passenger was killed for every 
2,227,041 carried, and 1 injured for every 
74,276 carried. For 1905 the figures show 
that 1,375,856 passengers were carried for 1 
killed, and 70,655 passengers were carried 
for 1 injured. For 1895, 1 passenger was 
killed for every 2,984,832 carried, and 1 in- 
jured for every 213,651 carried. With re- 
spect to the number of miles traveled, the 
figures for 1906 show that 70,126,686 pas- 
senger-miles were accomplished for each 
passenger killed, and 2,338,859 passenger- 
miles for each passenger injured. For 
1905 the figures were 44,320,576 pas- 
senger miles for each passenger killed, 
and 2,276,002 passenger-miles for each pas- 
senger injured. The figures for 1895 show 
that 71,696,743 passenger-miles were accom- 
plished for each passenger killed, and 5,131,- 
977 passenger-miles for each passenger in- 
jured. — Interstate Commerce Commission. 



GREAT SALT LAKE. 



GERMAN DEPARTMENT STORES. 



The spread of department stores has been 
relatively much slower in Germany than in 
the United States, and they have awakened 
a much more bitter animosity on the part of 
many of the smaller dealers. The number 
of department stores in the Empire in- 
creased from 82 in 1904 to 90 in 1906, a 
growth of not quite 10 per cent. During 
the same period large mercantile concerns 
(class 1 on the German tax list) have in- 
creased in number from 7,000 to 8,000, or 14 
per cent. Smaller concerns (class 2 on the 
list) have increased from 11,000 to 12,300, 
or over 10 per cent. Department stores are 
now in 62 cities, against 60 in 1904. Not a 
few are evidently distinctly below the rank 
of large commercial undertakings, as some 
11 pay less than $1,200 tax annually. The 
growth of the business of department stores 
is more rapid than the simple increase in 
number, as these establishments paid 28 per 
cent more tax in 1906 than in 1904. Busi- 
ness houses of class 1 show an increase in 
taxation of 23 per cent for the same period. 
Evidently the trend is steadily toward pro- 
portionately greater power and control of 
the commercial situation on the part of the 
larger aggregations of capital. 



SOME ANCIENT MARINERS. 



Denmark claims some interesting speci- 
mens of marine architecture in the five old- 
dest vessels in the world, says Shipping Il- 
lustrated. All are still in active service and 
some even trading to Iceland. The Albert- 
ine was built in 1794; Constance, 1773; De 
Tvcnde Erode, 1786; Emil Hauser, 1786, 
and Marie, 1776. American shipyards, as a 
matter of fact, can go the Danes one bet- 
ter. The 96-ton bark True Love, built at 
Chester, Pa., in 1764, is, or was up to very 
recently, in service as a coal barge on the 
Thames river at London. She has, how- 
ever, been under the British flag for many 
years. 



Bathing in Great Salt Lake is an unique 
experience, says the Travel Magazine. 

Flights of steps lead down into the wa- 
ter from the interminable platform along 
which the bathhouses are situated. The 
water is quite shallow at first, and you find 
a rare enjoyment for a time in wriggling 
your toes about in the salt that forms the 
bottom in place of accustomed sand. You 
are obliged to wade out some distance be- 
fore you experience the peculiar buoyancy 
of the lake. First, you feel your feet try- 
ing to swim out from under you. You find 
it more and more difficult to walk. You 
begin to float in spite of yourself. Then 
you realize you are non-sinkable. You can't 
sink if you want to. Throw yourself on 
your back or sit down or try to swim and 
you bob about like a rocking chair in a 
freshet. You feel as though you had been 
turned to cork. You can't help looking at 
the phenomenon subjectively. You don't 
see that there is anything peculiar about 
the water. It looks and feels like any other 
bathing water until you get some of it in 
your eyes or in your mouth. Then you 
wish you hadn't come. Ocean water is 
sweet in comparison. In fact, the chemist 
tells us it is eight times less salty. 

You can't drown in the lake by sinking, 
but you can be suffocated to death, which 
is just about as uncomfortable and unde- 
sirable. We found signs everywhere 
warning us against being too talkative or 
too frolicsome in the water. 

When we came out we brought with us 
large deposits of salt on our skin. As the 
water evaporated we found ourselves cov- 
ered with white crystals. Only a strong 
shower bath of fresh water or a good clothes 
brush can put you into fit condition to 
dress. 

WIRELESS ACROSS ATLANTIC. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Consul A. F. Dickson, of Gaspe, in Que- 
bec, makes the following report on the new 
wireless telegraph service between the Brit- 
ish Isles and Canada : 

The Marconi Company announces that it 
will be prepared for wireless telegraph serv- 
ice between the United Kingdom and Can- 
ada in September. The messages will be 
transmitted between Clifton, Ireland, and 
Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. The regular rates 
will be 5 cents per word and the Govern- 
ment and press rates 2y 2 cents. Great im- 
provements have been made lately to the 
station at Glace Bay, which has been 
moved to a more favorable situation and 
much enlarged. The station at Clifton has 
also been improved in order to meet the sit- 
uation. The first stations erected were 
found to be too small. For some time past 
the Marconi Company has had communica- 
tion across the Atlantic, and exhaustive 
tests have been carried on. The company 
has been transmitting messages from this 
side to England for some time, but it is only 
recently that the communication from Eng- 
land to Canada was thoroughly successful, 
and now that the tests have proved satis- 
factory the company intends entering the 
commercial field at once. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Fifteen men were killed and a score 
injured, several fatally, in a railroad 
collision at Bellaire, O., on September 
28. 

Upon the commonly accepted basis 
that one voter represents a population 
of live, San Francisco's present popu- 
lation is 425,000. 

After January 1, 190S, clergymen 
wiio have been traveling upon half 
rates on all Western railroads will be 
compelled to pay full fare. 

The Supreme Court of Illinois, on 
October 2, handed down an opinion 
declaring the new Primary Election 
law unconstitutional. 

Sebastian de Magill. a coffee planter 
of Brazil, is in New York raising a 
filibustering expedition with which to 
overthrow the Brazilian Government 
in the State of Minas Geraes. 

United States Senator William E. 
Borah was acquitted at Boise, Idaho, 
on October 2 of the charge of con- 
spiring to defraud the Government out 
of valuable Idaho timber lands, 

Seven more indictments in the liar- 
rishurg (Pa.) capitol prosecutions 
were returned by the Grand Jury on 
October 2. Every man named in the 
prosecutions has now been indicted. 

Nine of twenty-one candidates 
named in Cincinnati, O., at the Demo- 
cratic municipal convention refused to 
accept the nominations on account of 
the boss methods prevailing in the 
convention. 

The annual report of Adjutant Gen- 
eral Ainsworth, dealing with the mili- 
tia, shows that the strength of the or- 
ganized militia is 110,995, out of a 
total of 13,821,696 males available 
for military duty. 

Sir Wilfred Laurier, Premier of 
Canada, has instructed Dr. Monroe, 
Immigration Inspector at Vancouver, 
B. C, to cancel the recent order issued 
by Dr. Monroe against Japanese com- 
ing from Honolulu. 

Chancellor Hicks, at Vicksburg, 
Miss., declared the Gulf Compress 
Company an illegal trust and gave 
the corporation one year in which to 
wind up its business in the State and 
withdraw. He denied the application 
for a receiver. 

Japanese Consul-General Nosse has 
presented to the Dominion Cabinet a 
claim for $6000 damages for broken 
glass in Vancouver. The Government 
decided to pay this immediately. The 
city of Vancouver will be asked to 
make good the amount. 

Governor Curry of New Mexico, 
who spent some time with President 
Roosevelt, said recently: "The Pres- 
ident authorized me to say that he is 
for Statehood for New Mexico alone, 
and will do all he can to secure the 
passage of a Single Statehood bill." 

A monster petition signed by hun- 
dreds of British Columbians has been 
presented to Premier Laurier praying 
that, regardless of foreign countries 
and all sentimental and political con- 
siderations, the Government immedi- 
ately pass such legislation as may be 
requisite to insure the absolute ex- 
clusion of Orientals from the Do- 
minion. 

Frederick L. Hoffman, statistician 
for the Prudential Life, has tabulated 
the available suicide statistics of the 
country, covering sixty-five cities, with 
a total population of more than 
17,000,000. This shows 2919 suicides, 
an average of 18 per 100,000 of popu- 
lation, and a decrease of .8 per cent 
from the average for the last ten 
years. San Francisco leads with 
37.9 per 100,000. 



Cannon's Clothing- Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, -906 Johansson, -1486 

Andersson, A. II. Johansson, li. 
Askerlund, Daniel O. ..'onsen, -1412 



Anderson, S. 
Andersson, Adolf 
Ardelean, J. 

Absolonsen, Ole M. Jansson. K. G 
Andersen, Gustaf Johansen, Carl 
Aaquist, Thorvald 
A i n.sen, Karl A. 



Johansen, 1287 

Jensen. F. 

i Registered letter) 



ison, -1452 
Johanssen, A. -1557 



Albertsen, Johannes Khngstrom, G. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS, 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Andersen, P. -858 
Andersson, -1229 
Antonsen, Marius 
Anderson, -988 
Anderson, -807 
Anelsson, Karl B. 
Anderson, Charles 



K irsteln John 
Kruse, Ed. 
Klinthorn, Martin 
Karsberg, C. 
Karnp, G. II. 

Kulman, G. n. 

we^istered letter) 



Anderson, V. -1240 Kristei 

a in, -1305 Kennedy, J. 

Anderson, Albin 

Anderson, -1118 



Kishl, Hans 
Karlson. Gustaf 



Andersson, Patrick Kcrmagoret, Anatel 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices We buy direct from Kentucky 
1 >istilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Brusbard, 1402 

us, F. 
Bortrom, Wm. 
Bade, Alex. 
Benson, Ray 
Bouton. Eugene 
Blrim, CM. A 



K. • k. Albert 
Lindow, E. 
I.ukkiiiii, Mr. 
Lind, Gus A. 
J. utter, Franz 
Lindholm, Net 
1166 Luckman, '! I 



Bedford. Arthur l.arsen. All". 

Bundesen. Jens l.arsen. 1'. -1179 

Brander, W. -I38j'>arsen. Eivind 



iM 



B RO W IN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 18S6, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want, '"."he San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



*£g,ste^ 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 
Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BUY A LOT IN SAN PEDRO 

It will make you rich some day. 
Call on 

PECK & ANDERSON, 

Next door to the Postoffice. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer In 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS 


. A. 


LUCAS 


Undertaker and Embalmer 




Fourth 


Street. 


Between 


Front 


and Beacon Sts. 




SAN I 


3 EDRO. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



FRED S V END SEN 



UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

21 2-2 1 4 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



FOR FURNISHED CABINS 

GO TO 

ALEX. MUHLBERG 

370 3d STREET, bet. Centre and Mesa 

$1 per Week or $3 per Month and Up 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



ktrag, John K 
Bee, Colin 

i sen, Alf. 
Benreu. John E. 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
Bergstrom, Frame 
Blom, Fillp 
Brussel, Edward 
Brlngager, A. H. 
h, Borge 
il. G. A. 

Carlson, C. E. 



i >ouis, Coadon 
I .c.uncke, A. -1321 
Lewis, John 
1. ;u sen. Axel 
Lindholm, C. 
I.orentxen. Hilmer 
Lundstedt, C. 
Lindroos, Askar A. 
l.aine, Frank 
Le Goff, Sylvian 
k. Hans 
903Markman, H. 



Christiansen, Ludvlg-^artinson, August 



Chrlstensen, M 
Cohrt, Herman 
Collberg, Chas. 
i.'ln istoffersen, A. 
Coccine, Louis 
Christiansen 

. J. H. B. 
Cone, Pierre 
Carnaghan, Wm. 
Cook. Harry 
Carlson. Aksel 

Chriotensen, Christ Miller, James 
Carlson, Waldemar Magel, Fred 
Chamberlin, L. C. Malmqvtot, J. 

tensen, Ludwig Martyn, I.eroy 
Isen, Hans H. Mi.rmussen. Carl 

i mi. Alesandro Mikkelsen, Peter 
Di tinier. Otto Monterus, John 

Ison, Gustav Mikkelsen. A. S. 



.Martin, John B. 
Malmbei g, Robert 
Miller, James 
Mahring \V. 
McDonald, N. 
Maibohm, Hans 
Munroe, H. G. 
McLeod 

Mikkelsen, B. -144S 
Mannitrom, YV. 
Mattson, J . 



Dunwoodie, H. 

Dahlberg, J. 

Eliasson, Edward 

Ekeland, Sigurd 

Eggers, John 

Edelhagen, P. F. 

Bricson, Johan 

Fulvig. J. A. 

Friedrikson, Andrew Nordin, M 

Forstrom, Oskar Neilsen. W. 

Fernberg, Gustaf 

Garder. Oscar 

Gustafson, Oskar 

Goethebeur, Ch. 

Gallen, Paul 



Nass, Paddy 
. .ilson, Daniel 
Nil. son, -737 
Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Nilsen, N. A. -734 
Neilsen, George 
Nilsen, Peter 
Neerheim, Th. P. 



Nystrom, Ragnar 
Osterhais, R. 
Olsen, Guttorn 
Olsen, N. 
Olsen, Olaf 



Gundersen, Andreas Olson, W. -S68 
Olsen, A. -759 
Oysteth, S. 
Osterhuis. J. 
Paulsen, -606 
Petterson, Axel 
Petersen, Charley 
Paris, Walter 
Petersen, C. -721 
Pedersen, L. -1321 
kegistered letter) Pettersen, K. E. -903 

1 1 iul.nritter, Karl Pedersen, -896 
Pettersen, 1943 
Pedersen, Alf 
Penney, Mathem 
Persson, J. L. -921 
Petersen, E. -101 
Person, A. -1192 
I'olge, L. 
Perieny, Emil 



Gallen, R. 
Guerln, Le Port 
Gunmanreu,, John 
Goff, Steve 
Griel, Bernhardt 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Georges, Angela 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Herman, J. G 



i. Karl G. 
Henning. Gustav 
Hansen. Harry 
Haker, Matt 
Hansen, Chas. E. 
Hollti, John W. 
Holman, George M. 
Heesche, Heinrich 



Haldorsen, Herman Porter. Chas. 

[lohman, H. Piedvache, Eniile 

Hansen, -1073 Pederson, John 

Henriksen, Hans Perkins. D. 11. 
'Hansen, Hialmar Pedersen, Jack 

Hohman. Carl -17C7 Rauen, YV. 

Hansen, Christian Runge, Helricn 

iiansen, F. Reulund, Andrew 

gistered letter) Rheinhard, Wllhelm 

Hansen, -1454 Rush, Fred 

I Helms, W. Richardson, H. E. 

(Registered letter) Rytha. M. O. 

llenrides, G. (Reg. letter P. O.) 

Unison, J. A. Runge, H. 

Hansen, L. Reay, Stephen A. 

Holmstrom, Charlesltasmussen, R. 

Halvorsen, -595 Rice, Patric B. 

Herman, Fred Reynolds, Thomas 

Hillsen, Halvor Rash, H. 

Hendriksen. G. H. Renolds, August 



Smith, Aksel F. 
Schaffier, A. 

iReg. letter P. O.) 
Scarborda, Mario 



Hansen, Chr. F. 
Hudson, Mat 
Iversen, John 

( Pfl C W 11 IZ 6 i 

Johannesen, Hans H.Smith, Axel 
Johansen, Albert Sorensen, -1664 
Johansen, F. W. Singer, J. 
Johansen. C. M. -1593Samuelsen, Otto 
Jungjohan, John Soto, Pedro 



Johansson, Nils 

Jensen, P. -695 

Johansson, -1576 

Jensen, -734 

Johansen, G. 

Junker, Paul 

Johnson, John 

Johannesen, A. -1557 Schmidt, F. 

Johansen, A. F. -1287Steen, Hans 



Soderstrom, O. 
Sanders, Charles 
Stahn, M. 
Sorensen, Michael 
Svensson, Ture 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Scheel, Johannes 



Schannon, H. C. 
Sverkesen, L. C. 
Schulz, Chris 
Schmidt, E. -1670 
Selzer. M. 
Samrlo. S. 
Svedstrup, H 
Sverkesen, Lou 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Strandqvist. Louis 
Schatze. Otto 



ensen. H. -1311 
Johansen, Theodor 
Johnsen, -1281 
Jensen, Chris 
Juhnke. William 
Johansen, 1364 
Johnsen, J. -1050 
Jenssen, J .Kristen 
Johanssen, Aug. F. 
Jensen, -734 
Johnsen, Alf. 
Johansson, Hialmar Svendren. -1050 

ien, Walter Staff, Louis 
Johansson, N. Aug. Skugstad. Christian 
.;ohansen, -1462 Balberg, Oskar 

Johnsen, Gust. Tyrholm, Johan 

Jaansen, Hans Thompson, Stephen 

Jensen, Peter Tobiason, Johan 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Cablegrams from London convey the infor- 
mation that all the crew of the French ship 
Leon XIII, which went ashore at Kilrush, Ire- 
land, on October 1, have reached land. 

The new steam-schooner Olsen & Mahony, 
specially built for the Pacific Coast lumber trade, 
bound on her way from Baltimore to San Fran- 
cisco, passed the West Indies September 20. 

The Norwegian steamer Tellus, which went 
ashore on September 21 on the north spit at 
Gray's Harbor with a cargo of coal, has been 
sold for $210. The coal in the steamer brought 
$10(1. 

The United States armored cruisers West Vir- 
ginia, Colorado, Maryland and Pennsylvania, in 
command of Rear Admiral Dayton, arrived at 
San Francisco on September 27, from the Orient, 
via Honolulu, T. H. 

The British ship Celtic Chief, Captain Jones, 
which has been quoted on the overdue list from 
Hamburg to Honolulu, arrived at Honolulu, T. 
H., on September 19, 152 days out. Captain Jones 
reports fine weather all the way, but light winds. 

Already to date this season 764,730 cases of 
salmon have arrived at San Francisco from the 
northern fisheries. Only a few vessels now re- 
main to arrive, and it is safe to assume that the 
total season's catch will amount to about 850,000 
cases. 

Haviside, Wood & Co., have filed in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco a suit in 
libel against the American schooner Charles E. 
Folk to recover $297 for supplies furnished the 
schooner while at San Francisco on January 9, 
1907. 

The codfishing schooner Hunter arrived at San 
Francisco on September 30 from Unga, Alaska. 
Captain Anderson reports that on August 14 
Charles Pelton, a native of Finland, aged 35 
years, was drowned at Dory harbor, the boat in 
which he was fishing capsizing during a gale. 

Captain Christian Klingenberg, of the American 
whaling vessel Olga, was arraigned on the 
charge of murder in the United States Circuit 
Court at San Francisco on October 2. While 
the Olga was in the Behring Sea on October 10, 
1905, Klingenberg is charged with killing Jacob- 
son C. Paul, the engineer of the vessel. 

Captain A. J. Henderson of the revenue-cutter 
Thetis, on arrival at Seattle, Wash, on Septem- 
ber 24, from an Arctic expedition, confirmed with 
official reports accounts of a violent volcanic 
eruption of Mount Makushin on September 1 and 
the existence of a new peak rising from the sea, 
forming a part of the Bogoslow formation. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship 
Company) has purchased for $81,000 a 7500-ton 
tank steamer, which will be employed in the 
oil trade between Southern California and Japan. 
The company also bought the British steamer 
Hermione, which will lie renamed the Soyo 
Maru and be employed in the same trade. 

The overdue British ship Rajore, which was 
140 days out from London bound for San Fran- 
cisco, arrived on September 29. The Rajore was 
met by a pilot schooner and ordered, on behalf 
of the agents, to proceed at once to Portland. 
The Rajore has been quoted for some time on 
the overdue list at a premium of 6 per cent re- 
insurance. 

Maklonado & Co., have filed suit in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco against 
the British Foreign Marine Insurance Company 
to recover $1188 insurance on a cargo of kapok 
which was destroyed during a trip from Japan 
of the British steamer Germanicus on December 
15, 1904. The vessel caught fire and was de- 
stroyed. 

Collector of the Port Stratton, of San Fran- 
cisco, has received a telegram from the Commis- 
sioner of Navigation authorizing him to collect 
tonnage tax and port dues on coal brought in the 
bottoms of foreign vessels for use of the Navy. 
The collections, however, will be made under 
protest, as the matter is still under considera- 
tion by the Government. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Company has of- 
fered the Hawaiian Territorial Government $60,- 
000 for the old fish market propertv at Honolulu, 
which covers an area of 8000 square feet. It is 
understood that the steamship company wants 
the property for coal slicds, repair shoos and an 
equipment warehouse. The propertv is located 
near the harbor. 

The new steam-collier Thor, a self-trimming 
steamer of 7000 tons, with engines and boilers 
aft and clear poles fitted with one mast and two 
rows of decks, has been launched at Sunderland, 
Eng., for W. W. Wilhelm, Son & Co., for service 
from Nanaimo to San Francisco in the coal trade. 
The Western Fuel Company is stated to be in- 
terested in the vessel. 

Advices have been received at Victoria, B. C, 
that the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company has 
definitely decided to transfer the liners Empress 
of Ireland and Empress of Britain to the Pacific 
and that they will come next summer, being re- 
placed by faster steamers on the Atlantic. The 
Empress steamers now used in the Pacific will 
ultimately run to Australia. 

Captain Henry C. Gearing, chief of the equip- 
ment department at Mare Island, received a tele- 
gram on October 3 that the Sitka (Alaska) wire- 



less telegraph station has just been completed 
and is in full running order and is working per- 
fectly. The Sitka station is farthest north and 
completes a chain of nine established along the 
Coast by the Navy Department. 

F. F. Belles, formerly Chief of Construction of 
the Navy and now President of the Fore River 
Shipbuilding Company, is considering a olan to 
put on a line to carry coal to the Pacific Coast 
and carry back oil. It is thought that the plan 
ought to be a success by lowering the prices of 
coal in San Francisco, while at the same time 
helping to make a demand for California oil. 

The floating tonnage listed and on the way to 
San Francisco for this year to date is 312,389 
tons. To the same date last year the tonnage 
was 187,901 tons. A large amount of this extra 
tonnage is made up by the abnormal number of 
vessels on their way with coal. Never in the 
history of the port have so many vessels been 
under charter to convey coal to San Francisco. 

The American ship Shenandoah, bound from 
Baltimore to San Francisco, previously reported 
as having put in to Melbourne in a leaking con- 
dition, will have to discharge her cargo and 
undergo repairs. The leak in the Shenandoah 
was first discovered June 30, after a three days' 
gale, 1800 miles east of the Cape of Good Hope. 
Upon arriving at Melbourne the vessel was leak- 
ing at the rate of ten inches per hour. 

The Union Fish Company, of San Francisco, 
intends claiming $20,000 from the Russian Gov- 
ernment on account of losses caused by inter- 
ference with the company's codfishing vessels in 
the Okhotsk Sea. The claim will involve the 
handling of a very delicate question by the 
Government, as the company had the sanction 
and support of the Department of Labor and 
Commerce in the conduct of its fishing opera- 
tions in the Okhotsk Sea. 

In the matter of the stranding of the steamer 
San Gabriel, commanded by Charles Green, on 
the south side of Point Reyes on September 9, 
Supervising Inspector John Bermingham, has 
rendered a decision fixing the blame on Captain 
Green, charging him with neglect and unskill- 
fulness. As Green's license expired by limita- 
tion on September 29, it can not be suspended or 
revoked, but, according to the decision, his 
license can not be renewed before January 25, 
1908. 

The entry of the new steamer Governor into 
the service of the Pacific Coast Steamshin Com- 
pany's service is responsible for several changes 
of officers. Owing to his being the senior com- 
mander on the Puget Sound run, Captain Jepsen 
will take command of the Governor. Captain 
J. Shea will take command of the City of Puebla, 
permanently, when Captain Nopander returns 
with the steamer after her present trip. On the 
return of the steamer President from Nome, 
Captain Cousins, who is the second in seniority 
on the Puget Sound route, will take command of 
her. 

A test of supremacy between the Navy and the 
Labor and Commerce departments will be given 
when a decision is reached in the case of the 
British tramp steamer Netherlee, which arrived 
at Port Townsend, Wash., on October 4, seventy- 
eight days out from Norfolk, Va., laden with 
coal for the Navy and consigned to the Bremer- 
ton Navy Yard. Collector Harper refused to enter 
the vessel and issue a permit to discharge until 
she paid the $1 tonnage tax, which in the case of 
the Netherlee requires an advance of $2746. It is 
expected that the complication will be straight- 
ened out by the Navy Department adding customs 
dues to the amount agreed upon in the charter 
of the Netherlee. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as published at 
San Francisco on October 4: Ship Guiana, 200 
days from Mobile for Bahia Blanca, 90 per cent; 
Celtic Chief, 168 days from Hamburg for Hono- 
lulu, 8 per cent; La Tour d'Auvergne, 125 days 
from Rochester for San Francisco, 8 per cent; 
Medea, 222 days from Stettin for San Francisco, 26 
per cent; Simla, 164 days from Port Pirie for Fal- 
mouth, 21 per cent; Inverlyon, 148 days from Wal- 
laroo for Falmouth, 6 per cent; Thomasina, 156 
days from Port Pirie for Falmouth, 6 per cent; 
Haddon Hall, 154 days from Geelong for Fal- 
mouth, 6 per cent; Craigisla, 120 days from New- 
castle, Australia, for Mollendo, 10 per cent; Silber- 
horn, 114 days from Newcastle, Australia, for 
Pisagua, 60 per cent; Louise 116 davs from Brem- 
en for San Francisco, 11 per cent; Dumfriesshire, 
177 days from Shields for Port Los Angeles, 8 
per cent. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards, 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
ROSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va.. 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tehoupitoulas St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y.. 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tehoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW-YORK, N. Y„ 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO. O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 FraRer St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHOK, Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Mgr. 

TERMS IX ADVANCES. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months. ----- $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Rusiness Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
clasa matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1907. 



SEAMEN'S UNIONS ENJOINED. 



The injunction secured some time ago by 
the Hammond Lumber Company against the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, Marine Firemen, 
Oilers and Water Tenders and Marine Cooks 
and Stewards, which was appealed to the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals, was 
affirmed by the latter tribunal in a decision 
rendered by Judge Gilbert at San Francisco 
mi I ictober 7. The decision, in part, is as 
follows : 

It is contended- that the issuance of the re- 
straining order and the injunction were in ex- 
cess of the court's jurisdiction, and although 
there are decisions of the Circuit and District 
Courts of the United States which sustain such 
jurisdiction, the use of the writ of injunction for 
the purpose sought in the bill in the present case 
has not been countenanced by any decision of the 
Supreme Court of the United States. 

Flu- affidavits sufficiently show a combination 
of persons by concerted action to accomplish 
an unlawful purpose. 

It needs no citation of authorities to sustain 
the proposition that the appellee has the right 
to contract to employ labor and to carry on its 
business as it saw fit, without any interference 
from others, and that any attempt to compel an 
individual, firm or corporation from employing 
men or to prevent any man or men from work- 
ing for another is an unlawful interference with 
property rights. That such interference may be 
restrained by injunction is abundantly sustained 
by the courts of this country and England. 

It is urged that the injunction was violative 
of the rights of the appellant that tile defendant 
unions and the members had the right to en 
deavor to improve their conditions and to or 
ganize for that purpose; and hail the right to 
communicate their desires to others, whether 
they are in the employment of the appelli 
not, and to explain the differences that existed 
between them and their former employers. 

It was not to prevent the exercise of any of 
such rights that the injunction was sought or 
obtained. Its purpose was to prevent acts of 
lawlessness, of violence, of insult and of intimi- 
dation. 

No one can read the affidavits without arriv- 
ing at the conclusion that members of the union 
went far beyond the peaceful communication of 
their rights; their attitude toward their former 
employers; their purpose of self-protection and 
the objects of their combination. 

It may be true in the present case, as in many 
others of a similar character, that the disorders 
of the strike were deprecated by the officers 
and leaders of the unions, but that fact does not 
relieve the appellants of responsibility, nor render 
the court powerless to deal witli them in their 
collective capacity. 

The question of withholding or granting an 
injunction was one which rested in the sound 
discretion of the Circuit Court. We find no 
ground for saying that then' was absence of 
that discretion. The order is affirmed. 

Judge Gilbert's reasoning and conclusions 



are in keeping with the usual results in such 
. and are therefore no disappointment to 
the seamen. All that remains to be done is 
to "carry the case up," and this, of course, 
will be done immediately. It will be noted 
that Judge Gilbert alludes to the fact that "the 
use of the writ of injunction for the purpose 
sought in the bill in the present case has not 
been countenanced by any decision of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States." In order 
that the principles involved in the Hammond 
injunction may be finally determined, so far 
as the courts can do so, the case will be ap J 
pealed to the Supreme Court of the United 
States. That body will be asked to rule upon 
the question as to whether or not, in the legal 
point <>f view, labor is "property." As labor- 
ers, the organized seamen contend that labor 
and property are separate and distinct things, 
and that they can not rightly be classed to- 
gether in law for the purpose of vesting in 
an employer rights which are repugnant to 
and subversive of human liberty. 

Whatever may be the result of the appeal, 
the battle for the vindication of personal lib- 
erty is on, and it will be maintained until it 
is won, as it surely will be, if not in the courts, 
then in Congress. The Hammond Lumber 
Company has secured a verdict which enables 
it for the time to treat its employes as so 
much property. However, that concern is 
likely to realize the truth of the old adage 
that he who would go into litigation should 
he prepared to stay a long time. The sea- 
men's unions of the Pacific Coast, having been 
forced into a struggle in defense of their 
rights as men and citizens, will maintain the 
issue until it is finally settled. 



APPRENTICES ON THE COAST. 



It has been one of the mosl serious objections 
to the Chinese in this country, other than on the 
Pacific Coast, where labor competition enters 
into the question, that they live unnatural lives 
and have habits that are conducive to the increase 
of vice and the spread of disease. If they brought 
their waxes and children with them and made a 
serious attempt to enter into the economic and 
social life of the nation, and if under those cir- 
cumstances their children were allowed to grow 
up in ignorance and without the training for cit- 
izenship that comes from contact with their fel- 
lows in the schools, then there might be ground 
for reproach. Our Naturalization and Exclusion 
laws and the customs of the Chinese themselves 
preclude this, however, so that the "joke" has 
not nearly so much point as might appear at first 
glance. 

The foregoing, from the Philadelphia Pub- 
lic Ledger, affords another indication of the 
change that is rapidly coming over the spirit 
of the dream of the Eastern press. The 
"joke" alluded to by the Ledger was pointed 
out originally by the United States Consul at 
Tsing Tan, who professes to see something 
funny in the declared intention of the Chinese 
Government to establish schools for Chinese 
in the United States, thus placing the latter 
country in the same category as certain eastern 
lands noted for their backwardness in educa- 
tional affairs. In the opinion of the Ledger, 
the "joke" is a small one because the number 
of Chinese children in the United States is 
small. The main point of the Ledger's re- 
marks, however, is that that paper recognizes 
the undesirable character of the Chinese as 
immigrants, which, coming from such a 
source, is a concession to Anti-Chinese senti- 
ment the importance of which can hardly be 
exaggerated. 



Do your shopping early and give the Retail 
Clerks an opportunity to enjoy a fair measure 

of home life. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



The long-talked-of apprentice system has at 
last assumed the form of actual trial on the 
Pacific Coast. The Shipowners' Association 
of the Pacific Coast has adopted a form of in- 
denture under the terms of which boys may he 
apprenticed on vessels owned by members of 
the Association. A number of boys have al- 
ready taken advantage of this opportunity to 
learn the craft of seamanship and are now 
tackling the rudiments on various steam- 
schooners. The chief requirements of the 
system are as follows : Boys must be of 
American parentage, or eligible to American 
citizenship ; they must be at least sixteen years 
of age; they must be of good physique and 
moral character, and they must have a fair 
school education. The Shipowners' Associa- 
tion agrees that the apprentices will berth 
and mess with the ship's officers; that they 
will not be called upon to perform any service 
in the steward's department ; that they will be 
granted two weeks' shore leave yearly on full 
pay; that they will receive training in seaman- 
ship, navigation and in all duties pertaining to 
sea life, and that they will receive a monthly sal- 
ary i >f $20 for the first year, $30 for the second 
year, $40 for the third year, and a bonus of 
$250 for good behavior at the expiration of 
three years' apprenticeship. 

The system proposed by the Shipowners' 
Association is worthy of a fair trial. Both as 
a means of attracting American boys toward 
the sea and as a means of improving the per- 
sonnel of the merchant marine, the plan ought 
to be encouraged by all concerned. So far as 
the general question of apprenticeship is in- 
volved, the seamen of the Coast may be de- 
pended upon to co-operate in every legitimate 
effort to extend a knowledge of their craft 
among the youth of the country. Of course, 
the practical success of the apprentice system 
will depend upon the extent to which tact and 
earnestness are blended in working out the 
details. The apprentices should not be de- 
graded to mere drudges or roustabouts ; 
neither should they be taught or encouraged 
to regard themselves above any of the tasks 
that form a necessary part of the routine of 
ship's work. In a word, if it be intended that 
the apprentice system shall produce a body of 
ships' officers, it must first produce a body of 
seamen, of men themselves capable of doing 
the things over which they exercise super- 
vision. This requirement of practical seaman- 
ship suggests the desirability of extending the 
apprentice system to the sailing vessels on the 
Coast. Thus far, as we understand, the ap- 
prentices engaged are employed on steam ves- 
sels exclusively, a condition due, partly at 
least, to the indisposition of the sailing-ship 
owners to accept apprentices. Notwithstand- 
ing the notion prevalent among those who 
know little or nothing of the subject, the sail- 
ing ship still affords the best school of seaman- 
ship. These and other considerations of de- 
tail will occur as the system develops, and will 
probably be dealt with in the best way pos- 
sible under the circumstances. Practical ex- 
perience alone will determine the best method 
of procedure. With good faith on all hands 
the apprentice system adopted by the Ship- 
owners' Association should redound to the 
advancement of the seafaring craft. 



Demand the label of the Cigarmakers and 
Tobacco Workers when purchasing cigars or 
tobacco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Exclusion sentiment in British Columbia 
has assumed the form of a petition addressed 
to the Dominion Parliament in favor of the 
passage of a general law on the subject of 
Asiatic immigration. We print the gist of 
the petition, as follows : 

The undersigned residents of British Columbia 
humbly showeth that province to have been in 
the past and will continue to be the dumping 
ground of Oriental laborers, notably Hindoos, 
Japanese and Chinese. That at present there are 
30,000 Orientals of the foregoing races in British 
Columbia. That the Orientals enter into com- 
petition with white men, whom they have largely 
displaced in the fishing and lumbering industries 
and have usurped places among unskilled laborers 
that would otherwise be filled with white races 
in Canada, and thus prevent the formation of a 
homogeneous citizenship. 

That the national existence of Canada is threat- 
ened by the introduction of non-assimilating races 
and the consequent driving out of the white 
man; that a royal commission appointed by your 
Government fully investigated this question and 
urged the prohibition of all Oriental immigration, 
and your Government recognized the soundness 
of this decision by passing the Chinese Exclusion 
Act and arranging with the Government of Japan 
for a limited immigration; that the measures 
adopted by your Government have not been ef- 
fective to secure the desired ends. 

Therefore, your petitioners humbly pray that, 
regardless of foreign countries and all sentimental 
and political considerations, your Government 
immediately pass such legislation as may be requi- 
site to ensure the absolute exclusion of Orientals 
from Canada. 

These views fairly well set forth the argu- 
ment in favor of Exclusion. It is to be hoped 
that the Parliament will recognize the wis- 
dom and necessity of acting in such manner as 
to protect the rights of the Canadians against- 
the menace of Asiatic immigration, before that 
menace reaches dimensions that will defy all 
peaceful measures. 



The British Trade-Union Congress has re- 
affirmed its previous attitude by defeating a 
proposition to establish compulsory arbitra- 
tion. In this, as in many other matters, our 
British brethren have done credit to their 
well-established reputation for sound judg- 
ment and cautious procedure. The labor his- 
torian of these times will do the organized 
workers of Great Britain and the United States 
credit for having withstood the temptation to 
abandon the priceless boon of personal liberty 
in exchange for a mere promise of industrial 
peace. 



The Fresno Labor News is the name of the 
latest addition to the labor press of Califor- 
nia. Our new contemporary is neatly printed 
and up to date in its editorial features. As the 
official organ of the Trades and Labor Council 
of Fresno, Cal., the Labor News occupies a 
field that affords large opportunities of use- 
fulness to its readers and profit to itself. We 
extend congratulations and best wishes for 
success. 



When purchasing union-labeled articles be- 
ware of imitations. Beware especially of the 
dealer who offers to put the label on any arti- 
cle after it is purchased. The union label is 
always affixed to the article by the maker. 
Loose labels, "sewn in" or otherwise affixed, 
are frauds. 



In conjunction with the Japanese railways 
and steamship companies, the International 
Sleeping Car Company is organizing through 
passenger communication between Europe and 
Siberia and thence by the Eastern China Rail- 
way to Dalny and Japan. Express trains will 
be run between Tokyo and Shimonoseki, and 
the return journey to Siberia and Europe will 
be made by way of Fusan, Mukden and Har- 
bin. 



TAFT AND THE INJUNCTION. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



trade disputes are to make outlaws of men when 
they are not even charged with doing things in 
violation of any law of State or nation. 

Injunctions issued in labor disputes are not 
based on law, but are a species of judicial legisla- 
tion — judicial usurpation in the interest of the 
money power against workmen, innocent of any 
unlawful or criminal act, the doing of the lawful 
acts rendering the workers guilty of contempt of 
court. 

The writ of injunction is in itself a beneficent 
writ for the protection of property rights, but it 
never was intended and never should be applied 
to deprive men of their personal rights or the 
right of man's ownership of himself; the right 
of freedom of locomotion; freedom of assembly; 
freedom of association; the freedom of doing 
those things, which promote life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness, and which are not in viola- 
tion of law. 

Labor asks no immunity for any man who may 
be guilty of unlawful or criminal conduct. But 
we do insist that when a workman is charged 
with a crime he shall be tried by the same process 
of law as any other citizen. Anv other method is 
repugnant to the Constitution and the laws of 
the country. It is a shock to the conscience of 
our people; the spirit and genius of our Republic. 
Against any other view we protest; with anything 
less we shall not be content. 

The injunctions against which we protest are 
flagrantly, and without warrant of law, issued 
almost daily in some section of our country. 

President Samuel Gompers said in his Labor 
Day speech at the Jamestown Exposition: 

"An injunction is now being sought from the 
Supreme Court of the District of Columbia against 
myself and my colleagues of the Executive Coun- 
cil of the American Federation of Labor. It seeks 
to enjoin us from doing perfectly lawful acts; to 
deprive us of our lawful and constitutional rights. 

"So far as I am concerned, let me say that never 
have I nor ever will I violate a law. 

"I desire it to be clearly understood that when 
any court undertakes, without warrant of law, by 
the injunction process, to deprive me of my per- 
sonal rights and my personal liberty guaranteed 
by the Constitution, I shall have no hesitancy in 
asserting and exercising those rights. 

"And it may not be amiss to sound a word of 
warning and advice to such of the rampant, vin- 
dictive, greedy employers, who seek to rob the 
working people of our country of their lawful and 
constitutional rights by the unwarranted injunc- 
tion process. The workmen of the United States, 
are citizens, are men. They are intelligent and 
stand erect, looking their fellow-citizens squarely 
in the face, asking no immunity or favors, but as- 
serting their equal rights with all other men. They 
can and will maintain their equality before the 
law, all the contesting money power to the con- 
trary notwithstanding. ■ The full power of labor 
has never yet been exorcised in defense of its 
rights. It is not wise to compel its exercise." 

Secretary Taft seems to be bidding for the sup- 
port of Van Cleave's manufacturers' association, 
and would at the same time convey the impres- 
sion that he is awfully sensitive on the subject of 
special privileges. 

It has been shown time and again that what 
labor asks by the pending Anti-Injunction bill is 
simply a restoration of that equality of treatment 
by the courts with other interests which was en- 
joyed prior to the establishment of recent prece- 
dents — in the establishment of which, by the way, 
Juuge Taft himself took a leading part. If the 
mere right to do business, which is no more than 
the right to pursue a calling or vocation, is prop- 
erty to be protected by injunction, then, in order 
to preserve the equality for which he is so so- 
licitous, the courts should aid the wage-earner to 
hold his job and protect him by injunction against 
discharge, even for cause. But that is a proposi- 
tion the absurdity of which every workingman 
sees at a glance. 

Secretary Taft's contention with reference to 
what he terms the "boycott," would, if carried to 
its logical result, lead to the dispersion and forci- 
ble breaking up, by court orders, of every as- 
semblage of workingmen, however innocent or 
lawful their purpose, and to the nullification of 
all their agreements. 

The fact of the matter is that Secretary Taft as 
a Presidential aspirant is "afeared" he may have 
ruffled a feather here and there in the plume of 
capitalist power. His parting words are to console 
corporate influence and the money power for any 
uneasiness as to his position. He substantially as- 
sures them that if they will but give him their 
support, he will hand over to the tender mercies 
of the worst elements of the capitalists' class the 
workingmen of the United States, bound hand 
and foot, shackled by injunctions for which he will 
stand. — American Federationist. 



United States Commissioner Heacock at San 
Francisco on Sentcmber 25 discharged Peter Jus- 
tensen and Thomas Beita, who were charged by 
Captain M. Peterson of the steamer Kirchak with 
having assaulted him on the high seas. The men, 
it is said, tried to bring two jugs of whisky on 
board in the Far North, and a row with the cap- 
tain ensued. Commissioner Heacock decided that 
the evidence was insufficient. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., H. G. Lundberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. The resolution pro- 
viding for a donation of $500 to the striking Com- 
mercial Telegraphers was declared carried. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping brisk; prospects fair. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 23, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 3, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Wm. Brisco in the chair. The amend- 
ment to Article XIV to be known as Section 5, 
and to Article III, Section 1, were declared car- 
ried. Nomination of officers for the ensuing term 
was proceeded with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 26, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 26, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping fair. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping good. 

R. H. WALKER, Secretary. 

55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 1, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
V/ 2 A Lewis St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1907. 
Situation good. 

DANIEL SULLIVAN, Secretary. 
15 Union St. 



DIED. 

Einar Strand, No. 1123, a native of Nor- 
way, aged 31, died on the tug Marion, at Ketchi- 
kan, Alaska, July, 1907. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 













1 




ON THE GREAT LAKES 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




*^^* 



WRECK OF THE NIMICK. 



Captain Randall and five sailors of the 
steamer Alexander Nimick lost their lives 
on September 21 when their ship stranded 
on the south shore of Lake Superior and 
went to pieces in a heavy northwest gale. 
The remaining eleven men of the crew suc- 
ceeded in making their way safely through 
the surf to the shore. 

The Nimick, heavily laden with coal, was 
fighting her way up the Lake through the 
storm when the steering gear became dis- 
abled. Rendered unmanageable, the big 
ship was forced steadily toward the land, 
finally striking at a point thirteen miles 
west of Whitefish Point. 

From the survivors it was learned that 
the Nimick, after lying in shelter under 
Whitefish Point for some time, sprung a 
leak. The pumps could no longer keep the 
vessel afloat, and Captain Randall derided to 
run his ship on the beach. Before this time 
one of the yawlboats had been broken up by 
the heavy seas, and with the remaining one 
the members of the crew on the stern of the 
ship put out for shore, as the steamer al- 
ready had commenced to pound to pieces. 

Several attempts were made to rescue the 
six men in the bow of the ship, but it was 
impossible to battle with the heavy seas. 
and the small boat was run for shore, where 
the ten occupants landed safely. Six men 
were left in the bow of the steamer. One 
of these, Charles Craig, the chief engineer, 
plunged into the surf and succeeded in 
swimming ashore safely. 

Nothing more was seen of the five men 
who remained on the bow of the steamer as 
she broke up on account of the darkness, 
until the bodies of three were found early 
on the following morning. Steward Thomas 
Parent was washed overboard from the 
wreck soon after it struck. 

The place where the vessel struck is sur- 
rounded by an almost uninhabited wilder- 
ness, and the rescued men had to go far to 
seek shelter. 

The last report from the Nimick was from 
Sault Ste. Marie, where she passed up 
through the locks. A northwest gale had 
prevailed on Lake Superior for several days, 
and the ship remained in shelter behind 
Whitefish Point. When the storm finally 
subsided the steamer ventured out. although 
the sea was still running high, only to be 
dashed to destruction a few miles away. 

Following is the list of the dead so far 
as known : Captain John Randall, of Algo- 
nac, .Mich.; Wheelsman Lewis Dudley, 203 
Conger street, Detroit, Mich.; Watchmen 
John Watson, Paisley Scott, Thomas Parent, 
Port Huron, Mich. ; unknown watchman. 
Three of the bodies recovered are those of 
Watson. Paisley and Scott. Thus far the 
body of Captain Randall has not been 
thrown up by the sea. Gordon Tobin of 
Amherstburg, mate, went to Vermillion 
Point to search for the two bodies that were 
not recovered. 

The members of the crew who were saved 
are : Charles Craig, chief engineer, of Buf- 
falo ; John Smith, second mate, Detroit; 
Fred Brenner, second engineer, Detroit; R. 
B. Ewing, fireman, Doylestown, O. ; Harry 



Hutton, second cook, Detroit; William 
Kock, deckhand, Detroit; Austin McDoug- 
all, Goderich, James Henry, oiler, Buffalo; 
Frank Shaw, deckhand, ( Mean, X. Y. ; 
James Walvin, wheelsman, Detroit. 

Fireman Ewing said the steamer found- 
ered and that her engine was working when 
she went down. Her steering gear was 
not disabled and the steamer went to pieces 
in less than a half hour after they left her. 



A WORD OF ADVICE. 



The dull shipping and the large surplus 
of men ashore at this time brings us face 
to face with the folly of so many of our 
comrades in not providing for the prover- 
bial "rainy day." 

Through, or principally through, the 
evils of intemperance, very few of the boys 
are provided for a long stay ashore, and if 
shipping is poor, if for only a day or two, 
the effect is noticeable in the anxious 
looks of the sailor ashore. There is prob- 
ably no class of men in the world whose 
generosity equals that of the sailor. If he 
comes ashore with a pay, it belongs to 
every comrade he meets, till in probably 
three or four hours the profit of ten to 
twelve days' hard work is gone, and he 
joins the band of penniless men looking for 
a ship. He can usually go to the saloon- 
keeper with whom he spent his trip's pay, 
and get a drink in the morning, but to get 
a meal is a different matter. He must 
either starve, or knock on back doors, till 
he gets a ship. Does this teach the seaman 
the lesson that is so plainly laid before him, 
the lesson that he mugt depend upon him- 
self and his own efforts, to provide food 
and shelter for his body? Or does he "go 
against the booze" again as soon as he 
makes another trip, only to endure another 
period of hunger? 

I see so many "good fellows," who do 
this, that I am, I fear, becoming a crank 
on the subject of booze, though I venture 
to say, none of you like it better than I do. 
What, for instance, would be the result if 
you went to some boarding-house when 
you came ashore and paid a week's board, 
and let the booze alone, waited ashore until 
you could get the kind of a sight you want, 
then go to her sober, and stay aboard? 
You .certainly would have the best of it. 
Now, on the other hand, suppose you come 
ashore, pay your dues and proceed to get 
drunk, make it a habit to get as drunk as 
possible, then go to the hall of your union 
and start a rough house, making it miser- 
able for men who would like to be your 
friends and getting yourself disliked, 
finally winding up in trouble either with 
officers of your union, whom you have 
sworn to uphold, or with the police, and 
finally shipping out on some work-house or 
railroading out of town, penniless, hungry 
and miserable, and thinking hard thoughts 
of the delegate or agent because he would 
not let you "rough house" the hall. Sober 
common sense will tell you that the first 
and most imperative duty of your agent is 
to keep order. This is one side of it. Now, 
how about the man who goes aboard a ves- 
sel drunk, and proceeds to disgrace himself 



and his union by every conceivable bit of 
dirty work he can think of, and, what is 
worse, refuses duty, and expects to be upheld 
by the Union he has no more respect for 
than to disgrace? What of the man who 
refuses duty when sober? What of the 
man who, to gratify a little petty spite of 
his own, refuses to bring the vessel into 
port, or handle hatches when she is ready? 

Our Constitution is not severe enough to 
punish such men, but I want to say now. so 
all may know, that if I attend the next or 
any convention of the Lake Seamen's Un- 
ion I am going with the avowed purpose of 
putting into the Constitution a provision 
to expel, first, the man who knowingly 
violates his obligation to the Union, who 
goes aboard a vessel drunk, and who know- 
ingly violates the agreement which the 
Union has fought so hard and spent so 
much money to obtain, and, lastly, the man 
who makes a common practice of going into 
Union offices drunk, for the purpose of 
starting a row, knowing the delegate will 
not have him arrested, and owing to his 
being drunk, will not hurt him. 

This is not a temperance lecture, com- 
rades ; it is born of my utter disgust with 
the men before mentioned. I will do any- 
thing in the world for a decent man who 
is trying to do right; but a man who know- 
ingly time after time violates every prin- 
ciple of unionism and manhood has no place 
in my esteem. 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



Agent Scanlan of Detroit, requests me to 
notify members through the JOURNAL, that 
he has some money for different members, 
but it can not be sent in care of any vessel. 
The members must furnish a Postoffice ad- 
dress. 



September went out this year with very 
dull shipping, and lots of men ashore. The 
men who have jobs are apparently deter- 
mined to stick for the big money. Not a 
bad idea ! The surplus of men ashore is 
larger than I ever saw during the last five 
years at Conneaut. This means but one 
thing, men are not quitting the Lakes for 
"home" or for the South or for "salt water" 
so early this year. 



Comrades W. B. Cumming and Andrew 
McTigue send me news from Chicago of 
the heroism of Delegate Patterson of that 
port, September 24. Comrade Patterson, 
at the risk of his life, stopped a runaway 
horse, and saved the life of ten-year-old 
John Zaga. I am sorry that I can not ex- 
press my appreciation of this act of hero- 
ism in a proper manner. I can not find the 
right words exactly, and can only congratu- 
late "Bill" and say, "good boy!" 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



During the blow of September 20 a small 
lighthouse located on Osceola Sands, a point 
projecting into Portage Lake, about a half 
mile west of Portage Lake bridge, was 
blown from its foundation and carried some 
distance away. Repairs will be started im- 
mediately. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



The burned hulk Naomi will be rebuilt at 
Janitowoc. 



The Clarke Wireless Telegraphy Com- 
pany has opened its station at Buffalo and 
expects to have another in operation at the 
Soo by the end of October. 



Members of the Inland Waterways Com- 
mission will make the trip up the Lakes on 
the flagship Thomas F. Cole, of the Pitts- 
burg Steamship Company fleet. 



Having bent all the blades on her two pro- 
peller wheels, the Canadian fisheries cruiser 
Vigilant recently spent a couple of days in 
the drydock having them straightened. 



The steamer Harvey Brown, which 
stranded on the Breakwater shoal while go- 
ing into Buffalo, was released after 400 tons 
of her iron ore cargo had been lightered. 



Joseph King, a seaman, has filed a libel at 
Bay City for $147 against the steamer Fron- 
tenac, running on the Bay City-Detroit- 
Cleveland route. King alleges the amount 
is due for waees. 



The Bennett-Schnorbach Company, of 
Muskegon, has purchased the old passenger 
steamer Empire State and will this winter 
convert her into a stone barge. She will be 
ready for service next spring. 



The Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company has 
presented a bill for $59.78 to the Toledo 
Council, the amount being claimed for dam- 
ages received by the steamer Frontenac 
when the Cherry-street bridge was closed on 
the boat too soon. 



The old schooner S. B. Paige was driven 
ashore at Green Bay during the northwest 
storm on September 10, and will probably 
be a total loss. The life-savers took the crew 
off. The Paige was bound to Green Bay 
with a cargo of posts and ties. 



Of the boats mixed up in the recent col- 
lision at the Limekilns the Lycoming and 
Sweetheart are owned by James O'Connor, 
of Tonawanda, and the Boyce and Iron Cliff 
are owned by Captain John Boyce, of St. 
Clair, who sails the Boyce. 



Toledo is out with an invitation to vessel 
owners to tie up their boats at that port for 
the winter. First-class moorings are prom- 
ised. The Toledo people figure that every 
boat laid up there will mean an expenditure 
of from $2000 to $3000 for repair and fitting- 
out work. 



Officers of the steamer Mataafa report 
having seen the body of a man floating east- 
southeast of Colchester light, Lake Erie. 
The body was buoyed and marked with a 
white flag and is believed to be the same 
which was buoyed and marked by the yacht 
Capitola. 



James Realflf, aged fifty-two years, of St. 
Clair, steward on the steamer Hurlbut W. 
Smith, was killed at Chicago recently while 
his boat was in the drydock. He fell from 
the deck, receiving injuries that resulted 
in his death at the Marine Hospital a few 
hours later. 



The Edward Brothers' Dredge Company, 
of Sault Ste. Marie, was the only bidder at 
eighty-one cents a cubic yard for completing 
the grading at the naval training station for 
the Great Lakes at North Chicago on Sep- 
tember 17. There are about 33,000 cubic 
yards of earth to be removed. The bids 
were opened at the Navy Department. 



It has been decided to increase at once the 
number of workmen who are to put through 
the scheme of getting good water for Canton. 
The course has been selected along which the 
pipes are to be laid. The native papers say 
that the engineers have decided that a water 
tower must be built in Canton itself, in order 
that all parts of the city may be able to get a 
supply. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 
ville. 



William Smith is requested to write to 
his sister, Mrs. Lot. Beeks, at Mannsville, 
N. Y. Important! 



We Don't Patronize. 



John Murphy would like to hear from 
his brother, Dan Murphy, now on the Pa- 
cific Coast. Address John Murphy, 1244 
Main street, Cleveland. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT., CANADA Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven. Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan , Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O, 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
theim & Schiffer, of New York City; Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Floui — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Valley City Milling Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — -James Butler, New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

Whiskey — Finch Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 
Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hfits — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia. Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Henry H. Roe- 

lof & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y. ; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co.. Troy, N. Y. ; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co.. Troy, N. Y. ; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printinq — Hudson, Kimberley & Co., printers, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond, Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, 111.; Corning Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement — Portland Peninsular Cement Company. Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Baily & Co., Am- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark. Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Prown & Sharpe Tool 
Company. Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden, N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville, 111.; Casey <S.- Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Comprmy), Rutland, Vt. : Erie City Tron 
Works, Erie, Pa.: Singer Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.; Pittsburg E^'nanded Metal Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa.; American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul. 
Minn.; Standard Sewing Machine Company, Cleve 
land, Ohio; Manitowoc Dry Dock Company, Manito 
woe, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo.; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont. ; Home Stove 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind.; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, Circle- 
ville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumber — Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash.; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolis, 
Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Raymondsville, N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper — William Bailey & Sons. Cleveland, Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., TToboken. N. J. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany, Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth — Thos. E. Gleeson, East Newark, N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Bill Posters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co.. and New York Bill Posting Co., New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddington Hotel, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

Its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis. Ind. 
Thomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



OUR LUXURIOUS LEGISLATORS. 



LONDON AND NEW YORK. 



Members of Congress will soon have their 
offices in splendid palaces. Within a few- 
weeks after Congress meets in December 
the two new white marble palaces which are 
to be known simply as annexes to the 
House and Senate, will he ready for occu- 
pation. Each is a beautiful structure, cost- 
ing $2,500,000. and. occupying an entire 
block, has a total frontage on its four sides 
of 1747 feet, or about a third of a mile. 

These palaces are in effect detached 
wings of the Capitol. They are gigantic 
office buildings, each of them occupying 
more ground that the Waldorf-Astoria in 
New York. The House Annex, which is not 
far from completion, will contain four hun- 
dred and ten rooms— one for each Repre- 
sentative in Congress, with a few left over 
to provide for future increases in the mem- 
bership of the great legislative body. The 
Senate Annex is divided into ninety-nine 
suits, each comprising a private room for the 
Senator, a room for his secretary, and a 
bathroom. In both palaces will be em- 
ployed a multitude of uniformed menial-, to 
wait upon the luxurious statesmen, and to 
make life as easy and comfortable for them 
as possible. 

Servants' wages, rent, fuel, lights, and all 
incidentals are paid by the Government. 
The apartments are beautifully furnished 
and decorated at Uncle Sam's expense. 
Meals will he served in the rooms if de- 
sired. But in each palace is a vast and su- 
perbly equipped dining-salon, exclusively 
for legislators and their guests. 

The annexes will be connected by under- 
ground electric railways with the Capitol. 
In each palace one will find a subway station 
at the base of the rotunda, the most strik- 
ing architectural feature of the palatial an- 
nex. It is seventy-four feet in diameter, and 
extends upward clear through the four 
stories of the building, terminating in a su- 
perb dome under the roof. All of the space 
underground beneath its floor is occupied 
by the subway station, likewise circular, in- 
to which the trains come from the Capitol. 
The trains on this newest American sub- 
way are worth attention. 

They are composed of six tiny steel cars, 
each of them only sixteen feet long, under 
charge of a motorman and conductor, both 
of whom are in the uniform of the United 
States Government. 

Senators, Representatives and those who 
have business with them will ride to and fro 
in the trains, which seem like toys in com- 
parison with those that run above ground. 
All the cars are open on one side, the miss- 
ing side being replaced merely by a safety 
rail, so that there is only one bench run- 
ning lengthwise. Passengers entering at 
either end seat themselves upon this bench 
and look out through the open side of the 
car. 

The train runs through a tunnel which 
connects the Annex with the south end of 
the Capitol. This subway is seven hundred 
and fifty feet long, twenty-two feet wide, 
and eleven feet high. It has a curved roof, 
and along one side of it runs a walk six and 
a half feet in width, paved wth concrete. Be- 
ing lined with white vitrified brick and il- 
luminated by electricity, the tunnel, though 
without any skylights, is almost as light as 
day. — Rene Bache, in Harper's Weekly. 



"The Interpreter," writing in the October 
American Magazine, compares London, the 
chief city of a free-trade nation, with New 
York, the chief city of a protective nation. 

"Is there less poverty or less crime in 
England under free trade than there was 
under protection? To what extent has 
Cobden's great fight for free trade improved 
the general condition; No country in the 
world exhibits so painfully and so publicly 
the squalor and suffering of the poor as 
free-trade England. There are slums in 
New York, but London is all slums. The 
misery of the poor and the vices to which 
the poor fly for an anodyne to misery over- 
flow the precincts of the Eas1 End and stain 
Mayfair. If selfishly bent, a man can es- 
cape the evidences of human suffering in 
an American city. The people of Fifth 
avenue might never know that there was 
such a thing as abject poverty if they did 
not see it in its least unfavorable aspect. 
from a cab window while on their way to 
their country houses on Long Island or in 
New Jersey. But in London there is no es- 
cape. Base, brutalizing poverty sweeps 
along Park lane and gazes with sorrowful, 
cowardly eyes at the palaces of South Af- 
rican millionaires. It crowds the June morn- 
ing parade of smart ladies on Bond street. 
It touts for cabs or needlessly sweeps cross- 
ings in front of restaurants. It fills the 
Strand with drunkards, and Piccadilly with 
prostitutes. It is to be seen in the squares 
of the fashionable neighborhoods, where its 
presentment is drunken women asleep with 
their babies in their arms. England may be 
the richest country in the world, but London 
is a swamp of dreadful poverty. In degree 
the provincial cities are as bad. Who that 
has ever seen them can forget the palpable 
miseries of the poor of Edinburgh and 
Glasgow and Dublin? There is little choice 
between Manchester, the home of Richard 
Cobden, and Birmingham, the home of Jo- 
seph Chamberlain, the protectionist. It 
would be pretty hard to convince one of the 
thousands of London who 'sleep out' or 
'doss' in infected lodging houses that any 
benefit has arisen from free trade." 



It is learned on good authority that the sug- 
gested subsidy for the twenty-five knot steam- 
ship project across the Atlantic, as suggested 
by Sir Wilfrid Laurier at the closing session 
of the Imperial Conference, is $2,250,000 per 
annum for ten years, half to be borne by the 
British and Canadian Governments, respect- 
ively. This means a Canadian contribution of 
$1,125,000 yearly. During the short-term fis- 
cal year (nine months) ended March 31, 1907, 
the mail subsidies paid out by the Dominion 
amounted to $1,128,876, as against $1,227,560 
in the full fiscal year 1905-06. 



The population of Greece in 1821, before 
the breaking out of the war of independence, 
consisted of 875,150 Christians and 63,615 
Turks. In 1828 this had been reduced to 741,- 
950 Christians and 11,450 Turks, the differ- 
ence being presumably the number that disap- 
peared during the struggle. In 1853 the total 
population was 1,042,527; in 1889, 2,187,208, 
and in 1896, 2,433,806. It is feared that the 
coming census will not show a corresponding 
increase, as emigration has been heavy. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
PAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, Wash.. 3004 Mr-Carver St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. Wash.. 114 Quiney St. 
AP.FRPFF.N, Wash.. P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 
EFREKA. Cal.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN FEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
PAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT! E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

PAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Or., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Dietrich Doerflin, born 1861, is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco, Cal. 

Ludwig Luhrs, a native of Altona, Germany, is 
inquired for by the German Consul at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Edward Rodcy. born in Brixton, near London, 
England, aged about 54, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Bror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derhults, Forsanilin. Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martell, a native of Finland, aged about 
47. last heard of on the Pacific Coast about 15 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress. Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg, Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago, is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing his present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Ferndale, Wash. 

Ivar Walter Lindblom, native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address, 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis, Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years, 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



OLD BILL. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



and earnestly, the meanwhile nodding his 
head slowly and rhythmically after the man- 
ner of one who has just discovered the ex- 
pected. Then, handing the photograph to 
me he exclaimed : 

"Bli'me but Hi halways suspicioned that 
Hold Bill 'ad been crossed bin love, han' 
now Hi knows hit. Fine gal she is, too." 

I gazed at the face in the picture with 
the uneasy feeling of a person who is won- 
dering if he is not committing a sacrilege. 
Judged by the canons, of art of these days 
of the "Gibson girl" and other modernized 
types of feminine beauty, it was not a beau- 
tiful face. And yet it was unmistakably 
the face of one of those women for whom 
men will fight to the death, feminine in ev- 
ery lineament and curve, from the smooth, 
arching brow down to the sweetly express- 
ive mouth and rounded, dimpled chin. 

"What will you do with it?" queried 
"Cockney" Bob. 

"Put it back where we found it," I re- 
plied. "Old Bill evidently wished to have 
it buried with him." 

And so we replaced the picture above the 
heart of poor Old Bill and proceeded with 
the shroud in silence, the incident having, 
somehow, made us both reminiscently 
thoughtful. 

By and by we came to the point in our 
work where we needed something with 
which to weight the body. We therefore 
overhauled the lazarette and the boat- 
swain's locker for old scrap iron, but after 
half an hour's search emerged with only a 
couple of ringbolts and three or four pairs 
of old cliphooks, a shackle or two, etc., the 
whole weighing less than ten pounds. 

"This won't do," I said. "I guess we'll 
have to use some of those holystones," 
pointing to a pile of them in the lazarette. 

"Cockney" Bob scratched his head in a 
reflective manner and then suddenly burst 
out : 

"Hi 'ave it. What's the matter with 
that bloomin' hold mooring chain we've 
been chipping at these last two weeks?" 

"The very thing," I exclaimed. "If it 
hadn't been for Old Bill it would have been 
thrown overboard years ago, and now it is 
only meet that the two should sink to- 
gether." 

And so we lugged the rust-eaten old chain 
aft and coiled the whole of it, weighing 
some two hundred pounds, into the shroud 
at the feet of the dead man, after which 
we stitched the canvas securely together. 
As an additional precaution against any 
possible breakage we marled the whole 
tightly with about ten fathoms of ratline- 
stuff. 

After dinner all hands were mustered aft 
to attend the burial. When the main yards 
had been backed and her way stopped, six 
of us acting as pall-bearers deposited the 
corpse on a grating and carried it to the 
gangway, where we placed the grating 
athwart the rail. Everybody uncovered 
and the captain slowly and impressively 
began reading the burial service. When 
he reached the place where it says, "And 
we now commit thy body to the deep," etc., 
the inboard end of the grating was tilted 
upward and the remains of poor Old Bill 
slid splashing into the brine to their final 
resting place. In a few minutes more the 



Nellie Hawkins was again ploughing her 
way to the northward with everything 
drawing as before. 

When the braces had been coiled up we 
sauntered forward. There, clustered 
around the foremast, we began discussing 
the peculiarities of our departed shipmate. 
Now that he was dead and gone we, human- 
like, could think nothing but good of him. 
De mortuis nil nisi bonum, etc. The con- 
sensus of opinion was, perhaps, best ex- 
pressed by the "doctor," an old Southern 
darkey, who said : 

"Waal, gemmen, Marse Wallace mought 
er been a quar' sort o' man, but thar warn't 
no harm in him. But he suttinly did cot- 
ton to dis yar old hookah mo'n was good 
fo' him." 

"Anyway," chimed in little "Dublin," 
reflectively, "he was right about that prop- 
osition to keep things seven years, for that 
old mooring chain did come ih handy, after 
all." 

Just then the mate's voice was heard in 
the waist singing out : 

"Lee fore brace ; let go the fore tack 
there one man." 

As we went aft to brace up the yards 
"Cockney" Bob muttered to himself: 

"Hi knew bloody well Hold Bill couldn't 
rest in peace till 'e 'ad sent us a bloomin' 
'eadwind." 

Hawserlaid Bill. 

S. S. Sonoma. 



GROWTH IN WEALTH. 



CLASSES IN SCHOOLS. 



The baldest sort of outline which is possi- 
ble to be made of the growth of the United 
States in wealth leads us into a fairyland 
of figures, says Leslie's Weekly. Director 
North, of the Census Bureau, recently re- 
ported the country's wealth for 1904 at 
$106,881,000,000. These figures are so stu- 
pendous that the mind can hardly grasp 
them. Let us make a few comparisons and 
see if we can show how far and how fast the 
increase of wealth has beaten that of popu- 
lation. In 1850, the first year in which the 
Census Bureau made any inquiry into the 
matter, the country's real and personal prop- 
erty was placed at a value of $7,135,000,000. 
It was $16,159,000,000 in 1860, $42,642,000,- 
000 in 1880, $88,528,000,000 in 1900* and 
$106,881,000,000 in 1904. This increase has 
so far exceeded that in population that the 
percapita wealth of the country, which was 
$307 in 1850, was $513 in 1860, $850 in 1880, 
$1235 in 1900 ( and $1300 in 1904. 

Although there are no official figures for 
the country's wealth previous to 1850, the 
most careful estimates which have been 
made place it at less than $1,000,000,000 in 
1800. In that year the country's popula- 
tion was 5,308,000. Allowing for the growth 
between 1900 and the most recent year to 
which the Census Bureau's inquiry has ex- 
tended, we may place the country's popula- 
tion to-day at 85,000,000 and its wealth at 
$115,000,000,000. Thus we see that from 
1800 to these opening days of 1907, while 
the population of the United States has 
been multiplied 16 times, that of wealth has 
increased 115 times. 



The Cuban sugar crop for 1906-07 is about 
completed, and it is estimated that it will reach 
1,425,000 long tons, against 1,179,000 long 
tons the preceding year. 



A really serious problem in our education- 
al system which threatens to endanger not 
only the future ot our schools, but also to 
affect adversely the spirit of American de- 
mocracy by emphasizing class feeling, has 
been presented to the American parent by 
the establishment and development of the 
high school fraternity. 

The situation is just this: Some thirteen 
or fourteen years ago there sprung up in the 
high schools of this country secret societies 
patterned after the college and university 
fraternities. The inspiration for these came 
partly from a desire for more social life in 
the school, and partly from principals who 
had found their own college societies a dis- 
tinct benefit. The high school fraternities 
were quickly followed by sororities, and 
these organizations thrived harmlessly for 
a while. They were generally silly, but 
they were innocuous. As they increased in 
numbers and were strengthened by a chap- 
ter system all over the country they be- 
came a more and more powerful influence, 
until to-day they are the dominating element 
in the schools, and any challenge of their 
supremacy is accompanied by a threatened 
overturning of all school discipline. To- 
day educators are practically united m re- 
garding the high school secret society as an 
elephant on their hands, and they arc ex- 
tremely anxious to rid themselves of it. 
How, is the question teachers, parents and 
even lawyers are asking themselves. 

The three main charges on which the 
high school secret society is arraigned are, 
first, that it is undemocratic; second, that 
it resorts to cheap politics, and, third, that 
it is independent of school control. The 
National Educational Association investi- 
gated the matter, and from the results of 
the investigation saw fit, at a meeting in 
1905, to resolve against such societies, be- 
cause they are subversive to the principles of 
democracy, which should prevail in public 
schools; because they are selfish and tend 
to narrow the minds and sympathies of the 
pupils; because they stir up strife and con- 
tention; because they are snobbish ; because 
they dissipate energy and proper ambition ; 
because they set up wrong standards ; be- 
cause rewards arc not based on merit, but 
on fraternity vows; because they inculcate 
a feeling of self-sufficiency among the mem- 
bers ; because secondary school boys are too 
young for club life; because they are expen- 
sive and foster habits of extravagance ; be- 
cause they bring politics into the legitimate 
organization of the school ; because they de- 
tract interest from study, and because all le- 
gitimate elements for good — social, moral 
and intellectual — which these societies claim 
to possess, can better be supplied to the 
pupils through the school at large in the 
form of literary societies and clubs under 
the sanction and supervision of the facul- 
ties." — From "Are Secret Societies a Dan- 
ger to Our High Schools?" by Marion Me- 
lius in Review of Reviews. 



Since 1880 more than 700,000,000,000 feet 
of timber have been cut in the United 
States for lumber alone, including 80,000,- 
000,000 feet of coniferous timber in excess 
of the total coniferous stumpage estimate 
of the Census of 1880. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA. CAL. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Recently the Victorian railway au- 
thorities received 5(100 applications for 
acancies. 

According to Australian Premier 
Kidston, agricultural laborers are paid 
£1 a week and board al Stirling, in 
Scotland. 

There is every possibility that the 
waiters of the Paris cafes will shortly 
go "ii strike again in support of their 
cherished right to wear mustaches. 

Premier Bent, of Victoria, who has 
just returned from England, gives it 
as his opinion that 7s per day in Aus- 
tralia is better than lis m Canada. 

Seven thousand farmers have been 
cited as parties to an industrial dis- 
pute before the Arbitration Court at 
Christchurch, New Zealand, by the 
Farm Laborers' Union. 

In Denmark the unemployed benefit 
funds of the unions are supplemented 
by annual Government grants equal to 
one-third of the total premiums paid 
by members of recognized unions. 

According to the latest New Zea- 
land Parliamentary return, there are 
in the State 274 unions of wage- 
earners, with 34,978 members, and 
109 employers' unions, with 3337 
members. 

Eight workmen of the Narva llax- 
spinning mills were sentenced to death 
by a military court at St. Petersburg 
on October 2 for the murder last June 
of the manager of the works, a man 
named Otto Pelzer. 

The Butchers Shop Employes' Un- 
ion of Sydney, Australia, has bled a 
petition in the Arbitration Court for 
a share in the going prosperity, in the 
shape of reduced hours of labor and 
increased rates of pay. 

Count Von Posadowsky-Wehner, 
Minister of the Interior of Germany, 
has undertaken the preparation of a 
scheme for the maintenance of per- 
sons out of work while they are seek- 
ing employment. 

Domestic servants in New Zealand 
have issued a stirring circular invit- 
ing all lady helps, housemaids, cooks, 
generals, etc.. to join the union as 
early as possible, with the object of 
bettering their conditions. 

It is common talk in New South 
Wales that Premier Carruthcrs at the 
instigation of the Employers' Federa- 
tion, has promised to abolish the Ar- 
bitration Court, in consequent of the 
award given to the Shop Assistants' 
Union. 

The General Federation of Labor 
in France is considering the advis- 
ability of a general strike, in retalia- 
tion against the Government's action 
in prosecuting members for congratu- 
lating soldiers who refused to fire on 
the workers. 

The coal miners employed in the 
Hebburn Colliery, New South Wales, 
having some regard for their own lives, 
suspended their labor recently because 
the manager refused to remove an 
electric coal-cutting machine from the 
gassy portion of the mine. 

The labor situation in Austria is 
unsettled. Railway men are threaten- 
ing to strike and much dissatisfaction 
exists among miners, textile workers 
and other workmen. Three thousand 
foundrymen in Vienna struck on Sep- 
tember 23 for a nine-hour day and 
higher wages. 

A general strike of the employes of 
the United Railroads and the Havana 
Central Electric Railroad was de- 
clared on September 26. Trains are 
running with the help of the engi- 
neers, but without firemen or con- 
ductors. A tie-up of all the roads in 
the Island is feared. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Successor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots, Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe--$2.00 to $5.00-Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



betters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not called or sent for. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered and shipped 
to any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etr. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

W I': STERN II I >T E L BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 

Hoard and lodging. $5 per week. Single 

meals, 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 

322 First St., between D and E. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

Union Label Goods. 

A. ROSENSTEIN, Prop. 

23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore. 

Phone Clay 685. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Arras, Moritz 
Andersen, -1550 
Anderson. A. 
Andersen, Frltjof 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bergh, Edw. 
Bawens, Edemon 
Bjorkas, Herman 
Boose, Paul 
Bluhm, Peter 
Dalton. Thos. H. 
Eliassen, O. E. 
Elving, Gust 
Ehlers, Henry 
Eriksen, E. 
Enzbretsen. Dan. B. 
Gordlad, Arthur 
Gustafson, E. A. 
Goethe, Victor B. 
Griel, B. 
Hartman. Karl 
Helms, Wm. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Harrald 
Ivers, John 
Jaensen, Hans 
Jacobsson, John 
Johannessen, Hans 

H. 
Jansen, -1728 
Janson, Oscar 
.lohanson, A. J. 
Jorgensen, Ernst 
Kristoffersen, Emll 
Kaderhecht, Alf. 
Karlsson, A. M. 



Kaufold. E. 
Lyche, H. M. 
Lettve, Honore 
Lang, G. 
Lindstrom, Emll 
Lindeman. A. 
Le Fever, Louis 
Maack. Hans 
Nordstrom, Knut 

Olaf 
Nurmi. E. W. -865 
Nurminen, J. V. 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen. Albert 
Ordig, Bruno 
Petersen, Ed. 
Pettersson, G. E. 
Petterson, Harald 
Petterson, Mauritz 
Raetz, Aug. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Russell, Ed. 
Svendsen, Thorval 
Selander, Gust 
Swanson, Ivar 
Smith, Max 
Schmidt. E 
Staaf, Louis 
Thomson. John 
Tyrholm, Johan 
Udd. John 
Vincent. Joseph 
Walter, M. 
Westln. John 
Wllsen. Anders 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Lit- 
tle Beauty,' the "Princess" and 
other high gradeunlon-madecigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D. 

EUREKA, CAL. 





FOR A 




GOOD 


CUP OF 


COFFEE 


OR 


A SQUARE MEAL 




TRY 




EUREKA CHOP 


HOUSE 


Cor. Second and D St., 


Eureka, Cal. 


A. R. 


ABRAIIAMSEN, Prop. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 

Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 


Clothing and Furnishing Goods 


BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 


UNION LABEL GOODS 


PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 
is exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Hod Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

I Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND. WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton flannel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Adams, Joseph 
Aga, Johan 
Akesson, H. 
Allendsen, H. 
Albers, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 
Amnell. A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
Anderson, H. M. 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Victor 
Anderson, L. T. -735 
Anderson, Hjalmar 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen, -1520 
Apps, P. 

Appelquist, O. T. 
Arnesen. Martin 
Aspen, K. D. 
Austin. M. M. 
Bateman, S. J. 
Berg, Albert 
Bernard, S. 
Belin, Erik 
Bensen, F. 
Bernert. F. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bensen, J. E. 
Berg, H. M. 
Bee. Colin 
Berkelund. R. 
Bindseil. W. 
Billington, J. M. 
Bjornholm, H. 
Blecka, A. 
Blomberg. G. 
Botgereist, L. 
Boose, P. 
Bratrud. O. M. 
Braa. P. O. 
Brunstrom. G. 
Rronelew. W. 
Brewer. W. 
Brown, F. 
Bryning, W. 
Brown, James 
Burk, C. 

Bucktman, F. 
Bundersen. Jens 
Carlson. Jacob 
Carlsen, Hans 
Capello, H. 
Carlson, A. 
Carlson. R. -656 
Carlson. J. -861 
Chotard. Emll 
Clewlev. James 
Clark, S. D. 
Clauson, C. L. 
Cortes, P. 
Cook. H. 
Cort, V. 
Craig. C. A. 
Christensen, O. 
Danlelsen. David 
Daniels. C. 
Danlelsen. Ernest 
Dennett. J. 
rieboth. Paul 
Doran, Eugene 
Dorest, A. C. 
Dohman, F. 
Duncure, Y. 
Dudler, H. 
Edson, F. 
Edvardsen, J. 
Ekeland, S. 
Ellingsen, H. 
Eltman, H. 
Englund, R. 
Knglund. L. F. 
Engberg, O. 
Erikson, Olav 
Eriksen, Allen 
Eriksen, Viktor 
Eriksen, Konrad 
Eriksen, Aug 
Eskola, H. 
Evans, S. 
Ferraris. J. 
Fernandez, D. 
Fitzgerald, H. 
Fisher, T. 
Flynn. P. 
Karlson, G. -622 
Frlvold, J. J. 
Fredrlksen, W. 
Frlcke. C. 
Frankenberg, V. 
Garbers, H. 
Gad, V. 
Camber, Jas. 
Gerner. Hans 
Genstrom. F. 
Goerke. E. 
Gndt. W. 
Grower. Alton 
Grunholk, J. 
Green. J. 
Gunnason, J. 
Gtmdersen. G. 
Gnnther. Richard 
Gundersen. And. 
Gustafsen. Karl 
Gntman. H. 
Hansen. Fred 
Hansen. H. -1723 

fflay. w. -1179 

Harker. Ud. 
Haker. Max 
Hartnett. W. 
Hansen, Maurice 
TTngen. C. L. 
Hansen. H. C. F. 
Hansen, N. 
Haee. A. 
H.ilherg. O. 
Hardy. W. 
Hnnsen, Albert 
Hansen. W. 
rTnnerer. R. 
'Tnnsen J. E. 
Haknnsen. John 
Helms. W. 
TTeldenherg. O. 
ITermansen. F. 
Henriks, G. 



Helenius, K. 
Hennlng, L. 
Hikelict, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg, W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holti, J. W. 
Honde, P. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustide, II. 
Hultberg, E. J. 
Ingebretsen, John 
Ingebretsen, Karl 
Ingalls, W. L. 
Iversen, S. B. 
Isaksen, I 
Ivarsen, I. 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen, J. A. 
Jacobs, W. M. 
Jacobsen, Johan 
Jacobsen, H. M. 
Jacobsen, John 
Jack, P. 

Jacobsson, Johan 
Jensen, P. -1431 
Jensen, E. -1298 
Jensen, J. G. -1668 
Jensen. P. -748 
Jensen. J. G. -686 
Johansen, T. B. 
Johansen, A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen, Geo W. 
Johnsen, Aug. -1451 
Johnson. Fr. 
Johnson, C. J. -1566 
Johnson, N. G. 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson. IT. L. 
Johnson. Tim 
Johnsson. John A. 
Johnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 
Jonsson. A. J. 
Jones. Fred. 
Jorgensen. Alf. 
Jorgensen. Th. 
Jorgensen. J. A. 
Jurgenson. John 
Jordt. P .-1737 
Jurgenson. Ernest 
Kahlbetzer. F. 
Karlson. J. A. -388 
Kanford. Ed. 
Karlstrom. C. 
Karsimer. N. J. 
Kermagoret. A. 
Kelly, p. 
Kittelsen, K. 
Kinloch, W. 
Klemettllla. H. 
Kloes, W. O. F. 
Klemensen, C 
Knoff. II. 

Kristensen, E. -901 
Krause. E. 
Kreutz, C. 
Kristensen. K. D. 
Krager. H. 
Kristensen, G. 
Kroemke. N. 
Krousehet. A. T. 
Kristoffersen. Emll 
Kummerlowe. O. 
Laix. N. E 
Lalne. W. E. -1414 
Larsen, H. -957 
Larsen, K. H. 
Larsen, H. -iisr 
Larsen. Mathlas 
Larsen, Eingal 
Lemerle. C. 
Lepp. p. 

Le Fevre, L. 
Lersten, J. 
Lidgett, J. a. 

I.in.l. II. E. 
Lie. L. 

Linden. H. Vanden 
Lindeman. IT. 
Lie. J. T.. 
Lorho. M. 
Lunde, O. 
Lundgren, R. 
Lubeck, R. a. 
Lysell, i tea 
Mattson, F. 
Mnrtinsen. K. 

Madsen, G. F 
Mathlsen. M. 
Marthlnsen. Kr. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Mahan, W. F. 
McKenzie, A. 

Mens. J. 
Mestrand. O. 
Mietenan. J. 
MIdJo, A. 
Miller. C. W. 
Mikkelsen. Kr. 
Monchy. H. 
Merken, J. L. 
Muller. P. 
Muller. H. 
Munby. J. W. 
Nnss. Axel 
Nesbitt, James 
Nielsen. N. -751 
Nllsen, Edwin 
Nllsen. B. S. -731 
Nielsen, Anders 
Xilsen. Olans 
Nllsen, C. L. 
Nielsen. N. K. V. 
Nllsen, K. C. -972 
Nllsen. C. V. 
Nilson. C. J. -885 
Norris. J. E. 
Nolan, James 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Nystrom. Ragner 
Oextiger. O. 
Olsen. Ludvig 
Olsen. Harry 
Olsen. Oscar 
Olsen. Christ 
Olsen. Raynvald 

n, Johan 
Olsen, K. E. 
Olsen, IT. M. 
Olsen. Just. 















COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT," OWNED BY A. 

M. BENDETSON, CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

UNION MADE HATS 

UNION MADE SHOES 

UNION MADE COLLARS 

UNION MADE SUSPENDERS 

UNION MADE GLOVES 

UNION MADE OVERALLS 

UNION MADE SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & 

G STREETS, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



GRIGGS' HARDWARE STORE 

SHIP CHANDLER 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street 

ABERDEEN, - - - WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 
EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



THE HUB 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING STORE 
L. FOGEL, Prop. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubebr Boots 
to a Talior-made Suit. 

405 HERON STREET. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Olsen, Leip. 
Olsen, Ernst 
Osterberg, J. 
Ossis, A. 
Petersen, A. W. 
Petersen, Paul 
Otto, L. 
Overland, T. 
Parkhurst, Thos. 
Paulson, Hans 
Petersen, Ch. -990 
Pettersen, Axel 
Pedersen, L. 
Petersen, Peter 
Pederson, K. -980 
Pederson, John 
Pendville, N. 
Peterson, Mauritz 
Penosch, P. 
Plummer, Karl 
Prescott, F. F. 
Pohler, Joseph 
Polge, Louis 
Rahm, Carl 
Rasniussen, C. -551 
Rasmussen, R. -525 
Reuter, Ernest 
Remmel, T. 
Reimann, Carl 
Rikkartsen, H. -597 
Richard, Andreas 
Rosen, Frank L. 
Rosen, E. H. 
Rose, W. H. 
Ryberg, S. 
Quetski, Herman 
Savage, R. 
Sampson, C. -2137 
Sarin, K. 

Samuelsen, H. -1301 
Schwartsloze, F. 
Scherlan, R. 
Scott, E. G. 
Schroeder, Aug. 
Schieman, E. -1744 
Schaffer, P. 
Schoffler, A. 
Sebelin, C. 
Selander, J. 
Shane, J. 
Simmonds, A. E. 
Sikemeyer, W. 
Sjoquist, G. 
Smith, Ed. 
Smith, J. S. 
Sorensen, H. -1106 
Sohst, A. 



Sayland, A. 
Solie, I. 
Sovig, M. 
Senderman, G. 
Soheland, O. N. 
Stenberg, Alt. 
Sten, Ivar 
Stervik, Louis 
Sterr, W. T. 
Stuhr, H. M. 
Strandquist, Louis 
Steine, I. L. 
Stickles, L. A. 
Stein, A. -1883 
Stewart, F. 
Sveerd, S. H. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Svensson, G. A. 
Taylor, A. 
Tereutt. M. 
Thomsen, P. -1432 
Thomas, Wm. 
Thun, E. H. 
Thomassen, K. 
Titus, Ed. 
Tipp, Joseph 
Tolaas, K. 
Tornquist, M. 
Torqusen, K. 
Tonnesen, John 
Turner, D. B. 
Udd, John 
Unruh, Paul 
Vougt, C. 
Vierich, R. G. 
Wallrath, K. 
Wassemus, S. 
Watts, E. K. 
Wahlstedt, R. 
Wamp, H. P. 
Weber, O. C. 
Westad, Johan 
Westerholm. A. 
Wikhlad, Otto 
Wennick, And. 
Westin, C. O. 
Wenniche, Haldor 
Westbroch, Joe 
Wilhelm, H. 
Wiking, Aug. 
Willert, L. 
Woadhull, C. 
Wurzbach, W. 
Wulff, M. 
York, J. 
Zacko, K. 



1295 



-778 



W. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 

Encbom, Carl R. Larsen, Anton 

Eliassen, C. E. Larsen, L. K. 

Evans, Stanley McLennan, Donald 

Grew, Jorgen Olsen, Alfred 

Heine, C. Stachenssen, C 

Helms, William Syvertsen, Syvaret 

Hartman, Karl Sande, Anton 

Knopff, Fritz Tugland, Karl 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m. except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonaple prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia ots., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., or Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire-Latimer Block. Seattle, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713 

Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 
CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



WHEN IN BALLARD 
Visit the 
BOSTON CLOTHING HOUSE 
E. Goddman, Prop. 
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil- 
skins, etc., etc. 




Understand 



BROTHER 
UNIONISTS 



That the best made shoes — the shoes made under the best manu- 
facturing conditions — the shoes that best stand wear — bear the Union 
Stamp, as shown herewith. 

Ask your dealer for Union Stamp shoes, and if he cannot supply 
you, write 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS* UNION, 

246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 



^-^ _ jg ^-^w w^'w — ■*■« — ^ .r""* 8ee that this laDel ( in ^ght blue) 
^kejW Ix/I C 9 V^L I * 1^^ ^^% appears on the box from whieh 



you are served. 



Issued by Authority oftne Cigar MaKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(JhS (SfTllfutf. IIW the Clgwj contained inlhls box have been made by a MI5tCljSS \f\ferkmaiT 
a MMtlROf rut CIGAR MAKERS 'lintRNAtlom UNIONof America, an oiajmation devoted In the ad- 
vancement of the MORAi.MOTRlAl and INTEUICniAl WIKARE Of TVIC CRAff. therefore «e rocoramovj 



these Cigars to all smokers throughout the world 
' All Infringements upon this label vntfbe punished according to lava 



FAC 

»* s SIMILE 



Y- W (£L46ut4 President, 
" CM I U of. 



Labor News. 



Street disorders growing out of the 
strike of 5,000 furriers at New York 
resulted in the arrest of a score of the 
strikers on September 16. 

Union men in Wilkesbarre, Pa., 
have started a movement to boycott 
the beef packers as long as prices re- 
n, am at the present high rate. 

Premier Lattrier, of Canada, has de- 
clared bis refusal to denounce the 
treaty with Japan, as requested by the 
Canadian Trades and Labor Congress. 

United States Senator Flint, of 
California, announces that he will in- 
troduce a bill in the next Congress to 
restrict the immigration of Hindoos. 

It is learned from Martinique that 
the Panama Canal Commission has 
decided to contract for the immedi- 
ite employment of 3000 Chinese labor- 
ers on the Canal. 

The fruits of retrenchment by vari- 
ous big manufacturing concerns are 
becoming evident in Chicago. It is 
said that fully 18.000 men are now 
out of employment due to this cause 
alone. 

Judge A. G. Dayton, in the Federal 
Court at Wheeling, W. Va., on Sep- 
tember 24, sentenced John Beymer, 
a striking telephone lineman, and his 
wife to sixty days in the Hancock 
county Jail for contempt of court in 
calling "scab." 

Two hundred railway clerks, rep- 
resenting six roads, struck at Toledo, 
O., on September 26, demanding a 
working agreement with their em- 
ployers. An effort will be made to 
have freight handlers and teamsters 
join the strike. 

The American Federation of La- 
bor, replying to the suit of the Buck 
Stove and Range Company, an- 
nounces its intention to continue pub- 
lishing the name of that firm on the 
"We Don't Patronize" list until pre- 
vented by due process of law. 

Objecting to the employment of 
non-union miners, 350 members of the 
Western Federation of Miners em- 
ployed by the Daly West, Ontario and 
Little Bell mines at Park City, Utah, 
quit work on September 25 and the 
properties suspended operations. 

The request of the striking New 
York telegraphers made to the na- 
tional executive board that it call out 
all union operators employed by 
brokers and newspapers will not be 
granted by the board, on account of 
an existing agreement. 

George A. Pettibone, charged with 
the murder of former Governor Frank 
Steunenberg, has so far recovered 
from his recent illness that he was able 
to appear in court at Boise, Idaho, on 
September 27, and listen to an order 
fixing his trial for October 15. 

President Mickey Davis, of the 
Alaska Mine Workers' Union, has 
succeeded in his effort to form an al- 
liance with the Western Federation 
of Miners, and it is said that there 
will be a renewal of the warfare be- 
tween the Miners' Union and the 
operators in the Tanana (Alaska) dis- 
trict when the sluicing season begins 
next April. 

Announcement was made at Denver, 
Col., on September 24, that E. E. Clark, 
who was appointed to arbitrate the dif- 
ference between Western railroads and 
the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen 
over the 2-cent differential demanded 
for yardmen on the railroads west of 
the Missouri River, has granted the 
claim of the yardmen for 2 cents an 
hour more than is paid on Eastern 
roads. The decision will increase the 
wages of 3000 yardmen $5 a month. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



\ special dispatch from Peking 
the Dowager Empres has issued a de- 
c r« i.- declaring the Government of 

,i to be a constitutional monarchy. 

The Qrsuline nuns, who, for many 

e resided in the convent at 

] ins, France, were expelled on 

September 28 by a large force of 

gendarmes. 

Sir John Charles Bell, ex Sheriff of 
the City of London, Eng., and hea 
a big brewery company, was elected 
Lord Mayor of London on September 
28. 

.Mrs. Tingley's request for per 
sion to build a Theosophical institute 
on the picturesque island of Visin 
in Lake Vettern, has been refused by 
the Swedish Government. 

Several hundred young German 
women left 1 lamburg on Octol i 

German Southwest Africa, where 
they will take positions with the fami- 
lies <'f the German settlers and Gov- 
ernment officials. 

Secretary of War Taft, in an ad- 
dress at Tokio, Japan, on October 1, 
lared that war between the United 
States and Japan would be "a crime 
modern civilization and as 
wicked as it would be insane." 

An autopsy at Belgrade, Servia, 
shows that the two Servian political 
prisoners who weri killed on Septem 
ber 29 were the victims of police 
ferocity and the warden of the prison 
will be prosecuted for the murder. 

A romantic search for treasure and 
ie, valued at nearly a million ster- 
ling, i- about to be made by a private 
London syndicate, which proposes to 
salve the fleet sunk in the battle of 
Navarino, eighty years ago. 

Rioting at Calcutta, India, caused by 
seditious agitation, during which .about 
forty policemen were wounded on 
October 3, was renewed on the fol- 
lowing evening in the streets of that 
city. The trouble is attributed to po- 
lice brutality. 

The United States is to undertake 
the mining of coal on its own account 
from deposit, found on one of the 
southern islands in the Philippine 
ip, and that fuel will form the 
naval supply for a coaling station at 
or near Manila. 

conf) gration i iccurred at Wu 
Chow, China, on September 27. said 
to have been due to incendiarism. 
i cent establish 

rrent of a new interior customs sta- 
tii in at that place, the inhabitants of 
which are bitterlj opposed to an ex- 
tra taxation. 

A signed document by high officials 
and the commanders of the Persian 
\rmy has been presented to the Shah, 
to the effect that unless the sovereign 
accepts without reserve, and will act 
the demands of a con- 
st it i" \ eminent, they will re- 
sign in a body. 

Official figures show that France 
will reap bountiful harvests this year. 
The wheat yield will be 130,377,000 

against 114,501,000 last 
yearj rye will yield 20,642,000, against 

17.771.000, and maslin, a mixture of 
wheat and rye, will yield 2.474,000, 
against 2.200,()(!() hectolitres. 

The City Council of Kingston, Ja- 
maica, has adopted a resolution call- 
ing on the Government to amend the 
Alien Immigration law so as to pro- 
hibit the entrance of the undesirable 
class of i' ek trade in 

that city, to the ruin of the natives 
and other sub th( King. The 

resi ilutii >n is aimed at Chinese and 

Syrians, who. it is said, are Over- 
running the islands. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
t'n ion Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
lust Office at the expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 



Aarnio, John Erik 
Aasen, Alfred 
Abrahamsen, John 
Ahlborg, R. W. 
Albrecht, Emit 
Albright, Emil 
Allen, Fred 
Allen, -14S5 
Amundson, F. A. 
Andersen. Prank 
Andersen, Oscar 
Andersen, A. S. 

a, j. Martin 
Andersen, -1156 
Andersen, -1234 
Anderson, Knut 
Anderson, Kans iv. 
Anderson, All in 
\ nderson, -l t v.* 
Anderson, -1229 
Bade, Alex 
Bullhorn, Chr. N. 

erg, H. H. 
Bausback, -1511 
Baxter, W. J. 
Beling, Oscar 
Benson, John E. 
Berg, A. C. 
Berggren, V. 
Berglund, Nils P. 
Bergstrom, Frank 

e, R. 
Bjordal, Gunder 
Bjork, Algot 
Bjorkhoim, G. A. 
Bjorklund, E. S. 
Bio.iistad, N. M. 
Blmdheim, O. C. 
Caldwell, Wm. M. G. 
Canning, Jons 
Carlsen. Th. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Edvard 
i larlson, Hans 
Carlson, Conrad 
Carlsson, -1132 
Carron, Edw. 

>•, Larry 
Christiansen, M. F. 
Christiansen, -605 
Christiansen, Bernt 
Christiansen, -545 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Dalgaard, -1042 
1 am. Otto 
i annevig, M. 
I Meis, Fred 
I >e Baere, Henry 
Dempster, J. 
I tischler, Teter 
Ed< 'mann. G. 
Edler, Carl 
Ekman, Carl 
Ekstrand, Frank 
Elliott, John 
Fabricius, H. 

Fagerberg, Albin 
Fanning, Chris 
Ferraris, Joseph 
Fichter, Philip 
Fleck, -1888 
Follis, Geo. 
Folts, Frank 
Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gabrlelsen, C. W. 
Gad, Sophus 
Gadd, Krnst 
Gartz, Wm. 
Gillholm, A. 
Gjerdahl, Soren 
Gjerdahl, Ioren 
Goedhoop, H. 
Gorjussen, G. T. 
Gower, John 
Creiner, R. 
i [aldorsen, H. 
Wm. T. 
Halvorsen, Olaf 
Hs-Jvorsen, Isak 
I talvorsen, -1418 
l lalvorsen, -1425 
Halvorsen. M. 
liana, Olaf O. 
Hansen, -1606 
Hansen. Frithjof 
i [ansen, I larold O. 
Hansen. -1352 
Hansen, -1250 
Hansen, -1090 
Hansen. -968 

Hansen, -1769 

Hansen, -1729 
a. A. C. 
1 1: 1 risen, 1,. P. 
Hansen, Hjalmar 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hansen. -1609 
Harbeck. Theo. 
! larmenlng, F. 
Hartmann, G. 
Hartwig, Kurt 
Hedberg, All 

Isaacson, Isaac 

Jach, Paul 
Jacobsen, J. 
Jacobsen, Peder 

Jackson, C. L. 
Jakobsen, N. S. 
Jakobsen, Ole 
Jansen, K. 
Jarvie, W. 
Jefferson, -1426 
.1. us™, -1618 
Jensen, Henrik 
Jensen, -1279 
Jensen, -1326 
Jensen, -1733 
Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, Iver 
Jersch, W. 
Johannessen, J. E. 
lessen, J. E. 
Johannessen, M. E. 
Johannessen, J. 
Johannessen, -1656 
Johanson, A. 
Johanson, -1082 
rohanson, -1591 
Johanson, J. 
Johansen, 1677 
Johansen, -1592 
Johansen, -1821 



Anderson. Emil 
Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson, Simon E. 
Anderson, Henry 
Anderson, Andrew N. 
Andei'jon, -1447 
Anderson, F. A. 
Anderson, -1026 
Andersson, -1614 
Andersson, -1232 
Andersson, E. F. 
Andreasen, O. L. 
Andreasen, Mogens 
Andresen, E. L. 
Arbanen, V. E 
Arhesen, Is.>,* 
Arntsen. Julian 
Aspen, Knut 
Axelsson, C. B. 

Bogdon, Wm. 

Bono, Viktor 
Boreng, J. F. 
Boss, L. A. 
p.ostrom, -643 
Brandt, Otto 
Brandt. Gus 
Brenner, Ludv. 
Brose, J. A . 
Browne, Harold W. 
Brox, Henrik 
Bruce. J . 
Brumlinger, Paul 
Bryde, C. M. 
Burmeister, S. 
Burno, Frank 
Burns, F. B. 
Byl, Jacob 
Christiansen, 

Hjalmar 
Christensen, Chr. 
Christensen M. II. 
Christensen, N. F. 
Christensen, H. K. 
Christiansen, Ferd. 
C'aus, J. R. C. 
Clementz, Ole 
Cougher, Alex 
Cox, H. 
Crisp, E. 
Curtis, R. H. 

Dixon, John 
Domnisk, H. 
Donovan, L. 
Howling, S. G. 
Doyle, W. 
Drager, Otto 
Dunn, C. W. 
Dunne, Joseph 
Ellsen, Fred 
Elueff, Robt. H. 
Englund, Hjalmar 
Ericksen, Karl H. 
Esnault, Geo. 
Forstrom, Sivert 
Frederiksen, -532 
Freiberg, P. 
Froberg, Fred 
Frose, Ellas 
Frost, Hans 
Furlong, Wm. 

Grosman. R. 
Gundersen, John 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gundersen, L. S. 
Gundersen, Ole 
Gunnarsson, Geo. 
Gustavson, Robert 
Gulliksen, M. 
Guthre, Raymond 
Guthre, R. 
Guzak, B. 

Hedlund, -1726 
Heesche, Heinrich 
Heieke, Paul 
Helander, H. 
Hellesto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Helstrom, Chas. 
Helmer, Fritz 
I telmros, Gus. 
Henhusen, Peter 
Honge, Arthur 

el, R. 
Henriks, Gus. 
llenrikson, Peter 
Hermann, Helge 
Hill. Gus. 
Hillesvig. Alt'. 
Hjorth, Knud 
Hoeker. B. 
Hoffmann, FTitz 
Hoist, Richard 
Holm, T. W. 
liolste, Willy 
Holstein, R. 
noting, H. 
Hustede, H. 



Isberg, E. G. 

Johanson, Fred 
Johanson, Edw. 
Johanson, -1334 
Johansson, K. H. 
Johnsen, T . P. K. 
Johnsen, -1800 
Johnsen, Andreas 
Johnsen, Martin 
Johnsen, Peter 
Johnsen, John Aug. 
Johnson, 1300 
Johnson, -1283 
Johnson, Einar 
Johnsen, C. H. 
Johnson, -1451 
Johnson, A. A. 
Jordan, Gus. 
Jordt, -1737 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, R. W. 
Jorgensen. Theo. 
Jurgensen, W. P. 
Jorgensen, A. P. 
.Tuelsen, Ed. 
Juliusen, Jens 
Juliusen, Carl 
Jurgensen, Fred 
Jury, Chas. C. 



Kahlsen. -1198 
Kalnischke, otto 
Kane, Geo. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
i.'i Ison, Nestor 
Karlstrom, R. 
Keedel, cues 
Kenniston, F. R. 
Kimeral, H. 
Klahn. Chas. 
Klemo, Alf. 
Kiesow, Paul 

Laakonen, J. V. 
Laakso, Axel 
Laborde, Joseph 
Laason, M. 

iianim, P. 
Laine, -1391 
Lend g, C. W. 

Lang, Gus 
I.ange, Fred 
Lannqvist, O. 
Larson, A. P. 
I.arsen, Elnar A. 

en, -165S 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, Karl Chr 
Larsen. -1287 
Larson, Niels A. 
Larson. Chris 
Larson, L. M. 
Larson. Laurits S. 
Larson, -644 

ion, -1113 
Larson, -1199 

I. ais, ,n, -U'ss 

l ,.i rson, -l 106 

on, -1417 

Lawson, John 

Latsching, Evald 
Lauritsen, Geo. 
Leino, Emil 
Lewzey, Geo. 

Mans, Rudolf 

Madsen, J. c;. 

Magnus-sen, Jorgen 
Mahsing. W. 
Malmgren. Wm 
Malmqvlst, E. J. 
Martin, C. S. 
Martin, Frank B. 
Martens, Jules 
Martinson. D. 
Marz, Heinrieh 
Mathews, -1740 
Mathiesen, T. L. 
Mathiesen. Harry 
Mattson. Renhold 
Mattson, Mauritz 
McCormick, John 
MeFall. Fred L. 

Naumann, Alf. 
Nelson. G. 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nelson, M. P. 
Nelson, -906 
Nelson, Ole 
Nr-sbit, I. 
Nestor, Wilson 
Nicoln. D. 
Nielsen, A. C. 
Nielsen, -754 
Nielsen, -871 
Nielsen. -973 

Oberg. -790 

nor, Geo. 
Oedekoven, Franz 
Oesterling, Emil 
Ofeldt. Karl 
Ohlsson. Bertel 
Ohman, Aug. 
Oksanen, O. W. 
Olsen, Pet. 
i ilsen, Soren 
1 Usen, Eugene 
Olsen, -499 
Olsen, -970 
i Usen, Theodor 
Olsen. -836 
Olsen, -812 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, -534 
Olsen. Albert 
Olsen, Ingval 

Paajanen, Johan 
Pankhurst, Thos. 
Paul, Alex 
Paulsen, Einar 
Paulsen, -920 
Fayne, R. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, John 
Petersen, Jens O. 
Pedersen, Edward 
Pedersen, Bertel 
Petersen, -920 
Pedersen, Alf. L. 
Pedersen, -1136 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pedersen, Laurits 
Persson, H. W. 
Petersen. Hans 
Petersen. -782 



Kiesow. Paul 

Kofoed. Andreas 
Korneliusen, Ben 
Knopf, Fritz 
Krandsen, Niels 
Kreutzer, Karl 
Kristiansen, A. 
Kristensen, Hans 
Kristophersen, Jacob 
Kragstad, E. 
Krohnert, Alb. 
Kullman, Karl 

Linde, O. B. 
Linde, Bertel 
Lindhal, Michael 
Lindholm, A. B. 
I.indhohn, I-Jrik 
Lindholm, Arvid 
Lindkvist, A. I. 
Lindskog, C. O. T. 
Lindstrom, A. John 
Lohen. Fred 
Lohle, Martin 
Lofman. K. 
Long. Harry 
Lubeck. R. A. 
Luckman, Ewald 
Ludvigsen, Arne 
Lund. J. W. 
Lund. J. W. 
Lundberg, Carry 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Lundberg. Jacob 
Lundin, Anders 
Lungren. L. 
Lelsmann, Fr. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lersten. J. 
Levsen. R. J. 
I.ewald. Harry A. 
Lewis, Walter 
Lewis, Geo 



McGoldrick, Jas. 
McLean. John 
McLeod, John a. 
Meland. Ingvnlt 
Melander. C. G. 
Melln, Einar 
Mersman. A. 
Meyer, -1648 
Meyer, Fred 
Meyer, Frank 
Mikkelsen. A. S. 
Mikkelsen. E. C. C. 
Mikkelsen. Axel M. 
Milander, Karl 
Mills. Geo. 
Mohle. Otto 
Mulley, Jas. 



Nielsen. George 
Nielsen. Otto 
Nielsen. Fritz 
Nielsen. -717 
Nielsen, Henri 
Nilsen, Edvln 
Nilsen, H. 
Nilson, fohan 
Nilsson. Carl 
Nord. Ben. 
Nordlof, S. 
Nordstrom. Emil 
N\berg. Osear 

Olsen, Olaf S. 
Olsen, -677 
Olson, Harold 
Olson. -597 
Olson, -978 
Olson. -562 
Olsson, Albin 
Olsson, Philip 
I ipderbeck, Eugene 
O'Neill, F. J. 
I ': i Ig, Bruno 
Ortiz. John 

( isborn, Winfred 
Osmundsen, -937 
i isterman. Kail 
Ottem, Aksel 
Ouchterlony, Foil 
Overbo, Nils 
Overland, Tom 



Petersen. -1223 
Petersen, Carl G. 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen. -709 
Petersen, -10SS 
Petersen, -1164 
Petersen, Jens 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, Axel 
Petschow, W. 
Petterson. -1923 
Petrow. F. 
Pheiffer, Karl 
Pheiffer, M. 
Pietschmann, Geo. 
Pontynen, -1054 
Porrier, S. J. 
Prinz. Chas. 
Probst. R. 



Raahange. J. F. 
Itajala. Viktor 
Randolf, D. W. 
Rantanen, W. 
Rask. Hjalmar 
Rasmussen, Marcus 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Hans P. 
Raymond. M. L. 
Reese, -685 
Reilley, J. W. 
Reponen. Anton 
Reynolds. Thomas 

Saari, K. G. 

Panders, Frank 
Sarten, Chris 
Sauer, Emil 
Schelenz, Hans 
Sehmalkuche, Fr. 
Schmidt. H. 
Schmuhl, Wm. 



Rlchelsen, P. 
Rintzo. John 
Rono, Victor 
Rosbeck, Gus 
Roscheck, Paul 
Rosengreen, A. 
Rosengren, Frans 
Rosenholm, O. 
Rosenstrom, Frank 
Roth, Svend T. 
Rottol, A. S. 
Rudberg, C. 
Ryden, A. Oskar 

Scholz, -1888 
Schotis, Albert 
Schroeder, Freu 
Sehuler. Ed. 
Sehultz, Albert 
Scott, Emil G. 
Selander, G. 
Selander, W. 



Sellen, Geo. 
Sexon, Chas. 
Shawl. W. M. 
SikowEki, A. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Simonsen, Fred 
Simonsen, G. 
Sjogren, -330 
Siewertsen. Martin 
Skold. C. A. 
Smith, J. S. 
Staemmler, Hugo 
Stange. Anton 
Stangeland, O. B. 
Stein, G. 
Stervik. Ingvald 
Straehle, Karl 
Strokark, Paul 
Suckow, Franz 
Stone, S. W. 
Sundberg, Conrad 

Taylor. Jas. W. 
Teigland, Knudt 
Tennant, Thomas 
Tergesen. Tom 
Thompsen, Th. 
Thorman, H. 
Throndsen, Hans 
Thorne, Gus 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thornton, Boyce 
Thorsen, Johan 
Thoresen, Petter 
1 horsen. Torger 
Tiller, J. 

Qdbye, Harold 

Vesterman, F. 
Vidot. Wm. 
\'ongehr, Ewald 

Wagner, Claude 
W aiders. W. 
Wahlstedt, -778 
VVahlum, Gus. O. 
Wallace, Geo. 
Wasenius, S. 
Wei de, Fritz 
Werner, Paul 
Westerman, Jacob 
Westin. John 
Wiechmann, Aug. 
Wilde, Herman 



Smith, John A 
Smith, John V. 
Sodergren, -1972 
Soderman, M. 
Sorensen, -1822 
Soto, Pedro 
Speer, Kurt 
Spin. Knud A. 
Strand, -1786 
Stremmel. Harry 
Sundholm, Axel A. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundkvist, Chas. 
Svansen, Andrew 
Svendsen, -1903 
Svensen, Anker 
Svensson, -1188 
Swanson, -1386 
Swensen, Otto 
Swensen, Hans M. 
Swenson, -1932 

Todal, M. E. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Tollefsen, A. 
Torkilsen, Marius 
Torvig Olaf 
Torvig, Olaf 
Freder, Eugene 
Trendl, Ludv. 
Turn Rudolf 
Tuominen, A. 
Turner, Willy 
Turner. M. A. 
Turner, Ted 



Von Versen, E. 
Vortman, Wm. 
Vucic, V. 

Wikman, Peter 
Wlllmann, W. 
Winkel. A. 
Wischeropp, Fred 
Woker, Herman 
Wold, S. 
Wold, Haakon 
Wren, Mr. 
Wulff. Martin 
Wurzbach, -941 
Wychgel, -970 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Sam 
Albertsen, F. 
Ahlquist, A. 
Armstrong, Fr. 
Anderson, G. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen. -1235 
Anfindsen, O. 
Bowman, C. 
Bailei, W. 
B.I ink, A. 
i :• 1 1 helsen, A. 
Budenditsh, G. 
Benson, C. 
I intense, Y. 
i anberg. R. 
Dupon, J. 
ahldorf, D. 
in, R. W. 
Kliason, E. 
Edelman, G. 
l-'ianning, K. 
Fox. E. J. 
Flathead, C. 
Guthrie, R. 
Gullacsen, H. 
Gjerund. B. 
Glsmervld, C. J. 
Hansen, C. B. 
Holmstrom. Cb. 
ilawkins, M. 
Henrickson, M. 
Heart, Ch. 
Harbeck, Th. 
Hanson, G. 
. I risen. G. L. 
Johannesen, H. 
.Isaaksen. G. 
Josephsen, F. 

.loransson, P. J. 
Johnson, -1451 
Klintbom, M. 
Knudsen, H., -419 
Ketola, H. 
King. J. A. 
Lundin, A. 
Lauritson, G. 
Lampo, N. 
Lundblad. E. 
I.unde, O. 
Ludlow, J. 
Mail. ohm. H. 
Mortensen, Wm. 
Miller. J. 
Nystrom. E. 
Nordman, V. 
Nielsen, A. 
Nelson, -906 
Olsen, E., -515 
Olsen, J. 
Prager, H. 
Poison. J. 
Pedersen. N. C. 
Porter, Ch. 
Palmroth, C. E. 
Roy, J. A. 
Svensen. B. 
Squires, J. 
Simonsen. F. 
Smith. C. 
'1 umquist, E. 
Wikblad. Otto 
Wells, L. 



Aasprong, G. 
Andersen, A.. -853 
Anderson, John 
Arnold. Er. 
Andersen, A., -1057 
Anderson, C. 
Almeida, J. C. 

Bartholomew, W. 
Brander. W. 
Brucklond. E. 
Boe. D. 
luttgereit, L. 

Deising, E. 
Dittmeier, C. 
I ueain, Joe 
1 'e G-root, J. 

Emanuelsoa, A. 
F.rickson, M. 

Fuchs. J. 
Forstrom, O. 

Gasman, G. 
Gundersen. O. 
Goddard, M. 
Graugard, L. 
Haaland, J. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hnbenette. J. 
Hervig, J. 
Holten, O. J. 
Hicks, J. 

Johnson, Carl 
Jorgensen, J. P. 
Johansson. -151S 
Jensen, J. M. 
Jansen, J., -1555 

Kalsen, C. 
Koso. P. 
Klover, H., -463 

Lomquist. O. 
Lundin. C. 
Littorin, E. 
Lehtonen. W. 
Larsen, E. A. 
Larsn. K. J. 
Mulley. J. 
Melland. O. 

Nilsen. Ed. 
Nyman, A. 
Nystrom, R. 

Olsson, Johan 

Peed. J. 
Perkins, D. 
Pierson, A. 
Passon, B. 

Rislaksen, O. 
Swanson, J. 
Svensson, S. 
Swanne, H. 
Schmidt, Fr. 
Thogersen, T. 
Waring. H. 






Honolulu Letter List. 



Anderson, S. K. 
Diez. It. 
Kelninger, A. 



Pedersen. Adolf 
Ness. Edward 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Between King and Berry Streets, San Francisco. 

GENTS', BOYS', AND YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps. Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots. Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price, give us a call 
not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Do 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTO R N E Y - AT - L A W 

509 Golden Gate Ave., Cor. Polk. 

Phone Market 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



SULLIVAN'S SHOES 



(Established 30 years.) 



For 

SEAMEN'S 
Use 




Union 

Made and 

Strong 

MARKET! 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Sur- 
plus $ 2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in 
cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 38,156,931.28 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Bmil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



DON'T WAIT FOR YOUR SHIP 
TO COME IN, 

But Begin Now to Save. 

$2.00 is enough to start with, then 
every opportunity, deposit your spare 
change. 

Your account will grow rapidly and 
you will be encouraged — ere you know 
it you will have a snug sum laid by. 

You will not only have what you 
save, but we will make what you save 
earn 3^2%, compounded semi-annual- 

ly. 

We are open Saturday evenings. 

The Market Street Bank 

Market and Seventh Sts. 

Open Saturday afternoons and 
evenings. 

Safe deposit boxes $2.50 a year and up. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411, San Francisco] 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 



JOHN RBGNIER 

EXPRESSING 

Stand, 44-46 East Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 
CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



CAPT. CHRISTBINSEIN 

( POLORES 
Inventor of CHRISTENSEN'S 1 SOLAR AZIMUTH COMPASS 

( DISTANCE FINDER 
Has opened a School of Navigation at 82 MARKET STREET, ROOM 22, 
where practical navigation for passing U. S. examinations for steam and sail 
will be taught. 

Terms on application. 




Domestic and Naval. 



CHARLES LYONS of London 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

SUITS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

OVERCOATS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

TROUSERS TO ORDER FROM $5.00 UP 

1432 FILLMORE ST. I „ . „ „„ . „__„ 
731 VAN NESS AVE. PAN FRANCISCO 




958 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS. Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Room 3 



J. COHEN 8, CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters 
Boss of the Road and Can't Bust 'Em Overalls, 75 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR WALK OVER SHOES 




Established 1877 



raff 



VON SOWS 

Navigation 
School 

SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE, 
Steuart St. - - - Near Folsom 



Masters, Mates, Pilots and Engineers prepared to pass EXAMINA- 
TION for United States License. 

SHIPS' COMPASSES ADJUSTED. 

Bedrooms in the Institute can be had at $6 and $8 per month. Baths. 
Officers' Sitting Room. 



A belief that President Roosevelt's 
legislative programme next winter will 
include plans for a big increase in the 
Navy is strong in Washington. 

The brig Havilah, built at Bangor, 
Me., in 1877, has been purchased by 
Haldt & Cummins, of Philadelphia, 
Pa., and will be continued in the 
coasting trade. 

The motorboat Lizzie B. left Chi- 
cago, 111., on September 30, via the 
Drainage Canal and the Illinois River, 
bearing a message from Mayor Busse 
to President Roosevelt at St. Louis. 

North Dakota will be the name of 
battleship 23, one of the new 20,000- 
ton vessels, contracts for which were 
recently awarded by the Navy Depart- 
ment. The other vessel will be called 
the Delaware. 

The first eastward passage of the 
Cunard liner Lusitania from New 
York to Queenstown, occupied five 
days, four hours and nineteen min- 
utes, or three hours and twenty-five 
minutes more than her westward run. 

The steamer Alexander Mimick 
went ashore thirteen miles west of 
White Fish Point, in Lake Superior, 
on September 21, Captain Randall and 
five of the crew being drowned. 
Eleven members of the crew were 
rescued. 

Secretary of the Navy Metcalf has 
received from the Attorney-General, 
an opinion, presumably favorable, on 
the general question of the legality of 
the Navy Department chartering for- 
eign vessels to carry coal for the 
American Navy. 

There arrived at New York during 
August 458 vessels from foreign ports, 
representing 16 nationalities, accord- 
ing to reports of the boarding offi- 
cers. Of these ships 214 were Brit- 
ish, 71 American, 59 German, 47 Nor- 
wegian and 14 Italian. 

The steamer Picton, of the Riche- 
lieu and Ontario line, was burned at 
her dock at Toronto on September 21. 
Miss Minnie Hatch of Montreal, a 
passenger, was burned to death, and 
George Leskie, a fireman, was suf- 
focated. Loss $100,000. 

The New York Yacht Club has de- 
clined the challenge of Sir Thomas 
Lipton for a race for the America's 
Cup, upon the ground that Lipton's 
terms are not in keeping with the 
Club's rules. It is said that Lipton 
will issue another challenge in modi- 
fied form. 

An Imperial rescript forbidding the 
service of any Colonial authority of 
any legal process regarding fishery 
rights on board any American vessel 
and suspending all Colonial statutes 
authorizing Colonial officials to seize 
American vessels for alleged fishery 
offenses was proclaimed at St. Johns, 
N. F., on September 25. 

The American auxiliary yacht John 
P. Bradley, which left North Sydney, 
N. S., early in July for the Arctic 
region, returned to that port on Octo- 
ber 1, having landed an exploration ex- 
pedition, at Smith's Sound, latitude 79 
N. The expedition expects to cross 
Ellsmere land early in the spring and 
will attempt to reach the Pole by 
way of the Polar Sea. 

Bids for food supplies for Admiral 
Evans' battleship fleet on its coming 
trip to the Pacific Coast were opened 
at Washington, D. C, on October 3. 
The amount asked for approximates 
6,000,000 pounds, made up, perhaps, of 
two dozen different kinds of articles of 
fond, besides quantities of fruit ex- 
tracts, eggs and table delicacies, to 
be delivered at the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



J .11 k Sprat ci >uld eat no fruit, 

His wifey didn't try; 
They both were fond of fruit, but then 
prices were too high! 

— Exchange. 



Beauty and the Beast. — Hewitt— "I 
that t ' ey made a lion of yi >u a I 
the banquet the other night." 

Jev 3, and when I got homi 

F found a lion tamer, alt right." — Tit 
Bits. 



Hopeful. — She — "You call me beau 
t i f n I now. hut will you eall me beau 
t i f ill twenty years from now?" 

He — "Oh. why picture' the dis 

/erything? You may he dead 
then." — Chicago Record- 1 [erald. 



A ( i 1 Impn --ion.- Mrs. Grig 

"The new minister said he would call 
this evening." 

Mr. Griggs — "Then you had 1> 
dust the Bible and turn down a few 
rs of iIk leaves." — New York 
Telegram. 



ge held her hand and she held 

hisu ; 

; they hugged and went to kizn: 
[gnorant her pa had rizn — 
Madder'n hops and simply si/.n — 

?*!?0!*;*;'. ??? 
Gee! hut George went out whizn! 
— Princeton Tiger. 



The Tattle Tale.— "Are all these 

yours?" asked the caller. 

"Yes," replied the proud mother of 
the four hoys, "these are all my 
chickens." 

"Chickens?" snorted the had hoy in 
the next yard; "not much; they ain't! 
liny was all in swimmin' this morn- 
in'." 



All the Leading Brands 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 
/. 5. U. of A. Buttons For Sale 

GUS. HOLMGREN 

154 EAST ST. San Francisco 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 

LVNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

530 HAIGHT ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 
J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 

yrf ~^J Issotd tythiAuMinty ol the <^>- aG 
|IOTAaDWBKERS^^^,INTtRHCTQNAL | UIMIOIS 




A $20 Suit 
for $15 



Every retail clothier, as you 
know, buys of the wholesalers 
or manufacturers except S. N. 
WOOD C& CO. We are manu- 
facturers and sell direct to you. 

If you buy a suit here you may 
save that profit which the retailer 
is compelled to make. In short, 
you buy for the same price as any 
retail clothier pays. 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 



UPTOWN STORE 

Fillmore and Ellis Sts. 



DOWNTOWN STORE 

730 Market St. 



OAKLAND STORE 

Washington and 11th Sts. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 
THE MERCHANTS'" NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON SA VINGS DEPOSITS 

Authorized Capital $ 800,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 360,000 

Total Assets 2,200,000 

Money forwarded to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CIIAS. NELSON, President. HENRY WILSON. 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President. ALBERT SUTTON. 

L. M. MacDONALD, Cashier. MARTIN SANDERS. 

J. C. ESCHEN. W. H. LITTLE. 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 
THE 

United States Nautical College. 

^APT. J. G. HITCHFIELD - Principal 

'i in- oldest navigation school on the 
Pacifli Coasl (established 1S7.~>) offers you 
i hat '.m I,.. i in- obtained else- 
whei e. 

Oui mel i are short, thorough, con- 

cise .'i mi prai tical; I „;-jor- 

I ate, ami .Mm are assured of a "square 

deal." 

Terms on Application. 
Sailors' Home. San Francisco. 



CD 

r-» 



ISSUED BY AUTHORITY OF ' 



ftfGISTCREO. /""^ 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 
AGENTS FOR 
STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 
UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 
HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 
FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 
ISo. 4 MISSION ST., near East, SAIN FRANCISCO 



Union Made 

Pants 
2.00 to 5.00 

With a guarantee of a new 
pair free if they don't wear 

Wallenstein & Frost 

VAN NESS AND GOLDEN GATE AVES. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

W. L Douglas 

SHOES 

ALL STYLES AT THE 

Union Outfitting Co. 

Complete Men's Outfitters From 

Top to Bottom. 

26 EAST STREET 

BETWEEN MARKET AND MISSION. 




JAMES A. SORENSEN 

PRES. AND TREAS. 



SORENSEN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

For lO Years 6th and Mission Sts. 

Tlinrr r>Tnnrr> 715 MARKET STREET. Near Third 

HKLt MUKtV 1255 FULTON STREET. Near Devi.adero 
2593 MISSION STREET. Cor. 22nd Street 

Phone Connections for all Stores 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 

22K, 18K AND 14K WEDDING RINGS IN STOCK 



$100 

or more can be safely invested by 
placing monthly savings in small 
amounts so that they will bring 
large returns individually and al- 
low the 

Wage Earners 

of San Francisco to take part in 
supplying funds to rebuild the city. 

For particulars address: 

SAN FRANCISCO BOND and 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

30 MONTGOMERY STREET 



J&nu* lUdc/lft-, 



MADE 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1889 

Temporary Address, No. 775 Twenty-Second Street. 
Via Key Route. OAKLAND, CAL. 

This well-known school will occupy modern apartments and be fitted 
with all modern nautical appliances. Watch this paper for a special notice. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. P. 



THE NATIONAL. 

WANTED— 150 men to sleep in 
our new and clean beds; 25 and 50 
cents per night. 217 East street, 
between Washington and Jackson 
streets, San Francisco. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXI, No. 4. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1907. 


Whole No. 1044. 



RULING ON CHINESE CREWS. 



IN a ruling by the Solicitor of the Department 
of Commerce and Labor, under date of June 
7, 1907, it was decided that American vessels 
which engage Chinese crews in a Chinese or other 
foreign port and afterward enter the coastwise 
trade of the United States can not continue carry- 
ing such crews, as to do so would be a violation 
of the Coastwise Navigation laws. This ruling 
(published in a previous issue of the Journal) 
was elicited by a communication addressed to 
the Department by the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, referring specifically to the case of the 
steamer Lyra. The terms of the ruling seemed to 
be capable of extension to the steamers of the 
Pacific Mail Company, engaged in the trans- 
pacific trade and, incidentally, in the coastwise 
trade between San Francisco and Honolulu, T. H. 
Accordingly, the Sailors' Union addressed the De- 
partment, setting forth the facts in the case of 
the latter company. The communication of the 
Sailors' Union is as follows: 

San Francisco, Cal., July 31, 1907. 
Hon. Oscar Straus, 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 
Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir: 

For some years past the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company (a corporation) has been and now 
is operating several steam vessels flying the Amer- 
ican flag, out of the port of San Francisco, on voy- 
ages to Honolulu, thence to ports in China, Japan 
and the Philippine Islands, and return to San 
Francisco via the same ports. 

Such vessels carry passengers, United States 
mails, and cargo between San Francisco and 
Honolulu on the outward and inward voyages. 

The officers of each vessel are residents o* 
the City and County of San Francisco, and there 
sign shipping articles before the United States 
Shipping Commissioner, and at the expiration 
of each voyage they are paid off before him. 

The sailors, firemen, and waiters, in number 
about two hundred on each vessel, are Chinese 
aliens, and each are shipped and sign shipping 
articles before the United States Consul at Hong- 
kong, and upon the return of the vessel after 
each trip they are paid off before him at that 
place. 

It is our contention that such hiring and con- 
tracl of shipment and the presence of such aliens 
on board of American vessels is a violation of 
the provisions of Sections 4 and 8 of the Act of 
March 3, 1903, entitled, "An act to regulate the 
immigration of aliens into the United States." 

The wages paid to such Chinese are about $7 
per month; white persons doing the same work- 
on other vessels are paid from $35 to $45 per 
month. 

No direct judicial decision of the questions 
we lure submit to you has been had since the 
passage of the Act of 1903. Decisions of ques- 
tions arising under previous Acts can be foiind, 
and questions affecting the operation of the Act 
upon foreign vessels. None of the prior Acts 
upon the same subject contained language such 
as is found in Section 33, it reading as follows: 



"Sec. 33. That for the purposes of this Act 
the words 'United States,' as used in this title, 
as well as in the various sections of this Act, 
shall be construed to mean the United States 
and any waters, territory, or other place now 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof." 

We contend that if a vessel flying the American 
flag is a place subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States, then the contracting with aliens in 
Hongkong, and the taking of them on board of 
such vessels, is a violation of the provisions of 
the sections hereinbefore mentioned. 

Is an American vessel a place subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States? 

The decisions of the Courts are all one way 
upon this subject. His Honor, Justice Field, in 
the case of the Chinese Waiter, 13 Fed. Rep., 
286, said: 

"A person shipping on an American vessel as 
one of the crew is within the jurisdiction of the 
United States. An American vessel is deemed a 
part of the territory of the State within which 
its home port is situated, and, as such, a part 
of the territory of the United States." In re 
Moncan, 14 Fed. Rep., 47. 

In both of the above cases it was held that a 
Chinese person shipping on board of an American 
vessel was at all times within the United States, 
and by so doing he did not forfeit his right to 
admission under the Exclusion Act, as he had 
never left this country. If the above cases were 
correctly decided, and there is no doubt they 
were, the Chinese to which we call your atten- 
tion are undoubtedly within the United States, 
no matter where the vessel may be, and most 
certainly so when the vessel is in either the port 
of San Francisco or in Honolulu. 

In the case of In Re Ross, 140 U. S., 455, the 
Supreme Court of the United States says as fol- 
lows: 

Page 472. "By such enlistment he becomes an 
American seaman — one of an American crew on 
board of an American vessel — and as such en- 
titled to the protection and benefits of all the 
laws passed by Congress on behalf of American 
seamen, and subject to all their obligations and 
liabilities." . . . 

Page 477. "A ship is a kind of floating island." 

The scope of the foregoing decision is that 
a seaman on board of an American vessel re- 
nounces allegiance to his native country, what- 
ever that may be, during the time of his service, 
and that during such time he is subject to Ameri- 
can laws, and entitled to their benefit and pro- 
tection. 

We thus have the Chinese crews of the vessels 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company placed 
upon the same rank and equality with native born 
citizens by the mere act of the company itself, 
something not contemplated by the Exclusion 
Acts, and entirely contrary to the spirit of those 
Acts, and the Contract Labor law. 

In the case of Wilson vs. McNamee, 102 U. S., 
572, the Supreme Court, on page 574, says: 

"A vessel at sea is considered as a part of 
the territory to which she belongs when at 
home. It carries with it the local legal rights 
and jurisdiction of such locality. All on board 
are endowed and subject accordingly . . . . 
The jurisdiction of the local sovereign over a ves- 



sel and over those belonging to her in the home 
port and abroad on the sea, is, according to the 
law of nations, the same." 

It will be remembered that the United States 
Courts have exclusive jurisdiction of all crimes 
committed on board vessels on the high seas, 
and that this country emphatically denied the 
right of search of American vessels to Great 
Britain, claiming that vessels were a part of the 
territory of the United States, and it was that 
claim that led to the War of 1812. 

We will further direct your attention to the 
taking of Messrs. Mason and Slidell from the 
British vessel Trent by the United States sloop 
of war San Jacinto, and the claim urged by Great 
Britain on that occasion, which subsequently 
led to their surrender by this country. 

The case of Crapo vs. Kelley, 83 U. S., 610, 
is an exhaustive discussion upon the same sub- 
ject, and in which the Supreme Court reaches 
the same conclusions. See also The E. B. Ward, 
Jr., 17 Fed. Rep., 456. 

The vessels operated by the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company, as hereinbefore stated, as near as 
we remember their names, are as follows: Man- 
churia, Siberia, Korea, Mongolia and China, all 
of which, excepting only the China, are com- 
paratively new vessels, built on the Eastern part 
of this continent and brought to the Western 
shore with white crews, where they were re- 
placed with Chinese, some of the Chinese crews 
being brought as an additional crew in other 
vessels of the same company to San Francisco, 
and transferred in San Francisco harbor. One 
vessel, we believe, had her crew transferred to 
her in Mexico, the Chinese being taken there for 
that purpose, and the steamship calling there on 
her way to San Francisco from the place where 
she was built. 

We further submit that the Act of June 26, 
1884, 23 Stat. 58, permitting the master of a vessel 
engaged in the foreign trade to ship a crew 
abroad for a trip from a foreign port to a port 
of the United States and return, was never in- 
tended to permit vessels to do as the vessels of 
the Pacific Mail Company do. That was intended 
to cover the case' of a vessel finding herself des- 
titute of a crew in a foreign port, and not a case 
where one part of the crew is periodically shipped 
in the United States, and the other part for the 
same voyage in a foreign port. But if the Stat- 
utes of 1884 permitted that to be done, the Act 
of March 3, 1903, does not permit it if the crew 
so shipped are aliens, and the latter Act of ne- 
cessity repeals (he Act of 1884 in the particulars 
mentioned. 

The intention of Congress in the Act of 1903 
was to improve the condition of the w.itfc-workers 
of this country, and prevent the competition oi 
the pauper labor of other countries, it has been 
held applicable to seamen. 

Tylor vs. U. S., 152 U. S., 1. 

Op. Solr. June 7, 1907. 

Seamen arc in the cases above mentioned 
brought into direct competition with the pauper 
labor of Asia. The merchant marine is a training 
school for seamen for vessels of war. Other na- 
tions draw from it to man their vessels of war. 
Tht inability of the United States at this time to 
obtain sufficient sailors to man its vessels of war 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY. 



EIGHT-HOUR ORDER. 



(For the Coasl Seamen's Journal.) 
I've sailed across the seven seas, and roamed the 

wide world o'er. 
Both Hemispheres I've scoured for years in quest 

of wealth and lore. 
And as I voyaged here and there, on distant 

cruises bound, 
Full many times in foreign climes fair-seeming 

spots I found. 
And yet, with all, methinks I've seen no place in 

all my day 
That can compare, in beauty rare, with San 

Francisco Bay. 

My eyes have scanned each sea laved mile of 

Albion's storied shores. 
I've cruised the seas 'twixt Spain and Greece, 

been wrecked on the Azores; 
Around Cape Horn and the Good Hope to India's 

palm-grown strand; 
From Baffin's Bay to Mandalay, past many a 

favored land 
And sun-kissed isle in Southern sea.-, my bark has 

ploughed her way — 
But. give to me the scenery 'round San Francisco 

Bay. 

[own where the sombre blackness of the starless 

Oil de Sac 
Enjoins the morn to sternly warn the trav'ler to 

turn back, 
And where the fiery Southern Cross lights up the 

firmament, 
Oft have I sat and gazed at that vast stellar 

continent. 
But in my eyes the brightest orbs of all are, to 

this day. 
The star- that light the sky at night o'er San 

Francisco Bay. 

On Asia's verdant hills and plains, in Afric's fev- 
ered glades. 

Upon the Nile and Pharos' Isle, down where the 
Ganges fades 

Away in the pellucid sea, in Alpine valleys fair — 

In every zone to trav'ler known — my lungs have 
tried the air, 

And thus I know that nowhere is there air. for 
work or play, 

That beats the air. the bracing air, on San Fran- 
cisco Bay. 

Like every sailorman, I love a harbor deep and 

wide — 
A land-locked bay where big ships may at anchor 

safely ride. 
I love to watch the ships make sail when getting 

under weigh: 
To see them glide across the tide, a-standing 

down the bay. 
That's why I linger, dreamily, to watch, whene'er 

I may, 
The ships that sail with freight and mail from 

San Francisco Bay. 

A few brief years and I must bow to Nature's 

stern decree; 
Must cross the bar that waits, afar, for all who 

sail life's sea. 
Ah, well — long life is not the best that mortal 

may desire, 
So when my day has passed away I'll willingly 

retire. 
The only boon I'll crave is that my bones be 

laid away 
Beneath the sand that lines the strand of San 

Francisco Bay. 

And when my spirit, freed at last, mounts t" thai 
realm above. 

Where angels play on harps all day, and chant 
sweet hymns of love; 

When Peter's found my record straight, and 
opened wide the door — 

Invited me to seated be up there for ever- 
more — 

Then, as he turns to let the next man in. I know 
I'll say: 

"I'd rather go and watch, below, o'er San Fran- 
cisco Bay." 

HAWSKRI.Ain BILL. 
S. S. Sonoma. 



A general order issued by the War De- 
partment on September 17th is ealculated 
to put an end Id the long-drawn-out contro- 
versy between organized labor and the army 
engineers over the question of enforcing the 
eight-hour day in all Government work. 

The labor unions, according to the order, 
win decisively! !'<>r the new proclamation 
amends the army regulations making the 
eight-hour day so general that it seems to 
leave no point over which even labor leaders 
can dispute. 

Samuel Gompers, President of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, and other labor 
leaders have been hammering at this sub- 
ject for years, and have had extended cor- 
respondence with President Roosevelt about 
it, as well as several conferences at the 
\\ liite House. About a year ago the subject 
reached such a critical stage that it added a 
g 1 deal of energy to the campaign en- 
gineered by Gompers and his allies against 
Republican Congressmen who were running 
for re-election. 

At that time C.ompers publicly accused 
the President of bad faith in failing to 
that the law was fully enforced. The re- 
sult was an investigation by Doctor Xeil, 
chief of the Bureau of Labor, who found 
that on some Government works the army 
engineers in charge were permitting con- 
tractors to work their men more than eight 
hours a day. 

The question was then called to the at- 
tention of Secretary Taft. Me at once gave 
orders that thereafter no overtime work 
should be permitted, and that complaints of 
such should be reported to him immediately. 
Now he has gone further, and by amending 
the regulations incorporated that order in 
the fundamental working law of the army. 

The new regulation is very comprehen- 
sive, and provides that a stipulation cov- 
ering its contents shall be incorporated in 
any contract to be let hereafter. This 
will make it apply to all river and harbor 
work, and to public buildings being erected 
under the supervision of army engineers. 
No mention of the Panama Canal is made in 
the amended regulation, and that bone of 
contention between the labor organizations 
and the Government will be left for them to 
gnaw on. The labor leaders contend that 
the Eight-Hour law should apply there as 
well as in this country, but the War De- 
partment has held that there has never been 
a determination that the Canal "public 
work" was within the meaning of the 
statute. The labor leaders have complained 
long and bitterly that this was merely a de- 
vice on the part of the department to get 
around the application of the law. The new 
regulation reads: 

"Eight hours shall constitute a day's 
work for all mechanics, laborers and work- 
men employed by the several staff depart- 
ments. The service of mechanics and labor- 
ers employed by contractors in the execu- 
tion of public works, including the construc- 
tion of barracks, quarters or other buildings 
on military reservations, is also limited and 
restricted to eight hours in each calendar 
day, and no officer or contractor shall re- 
quire or permit any such laborer or me- 
chanic to work more than eight hours in any 
calendar day, except in cases of extraordi- 
nary emergency. There are excepted from 
the operation of this rule : 



"The officers and crews of vessels. 
"Teamsters, packers and other employes 

belonging to wagon and pack trains when 
engaged in field service or in the prosecution 
of military operations. 

"Persons employed as cooks and cooks' 
helpers, overseers of labor of prisoners, 
and others, who, owing to the nature of 
their employment being peculiar, may be 
decided by the Secretary of War, upon the 
facts being reported to him, to be neither 
laborers nor mechanics within the meaning 
of the Eight-Hour law. All exceptions on the 
ground of extraordinary emergency will be 
promptly reported to the Secretary of War. 

"All contracts for the execution of public 
works, including the erection of buildings 
for the use of the military establishment, 
will contain astipulation restricting the serv- 
ice of mechanics and laborers to eight 
hours per day, and officers charged with 
the supervision and execution of such con- 
tracts will report all violations of such 
stipulation to the head of the bureau 
charged with the prosecution of the work." 



EARTH'S POPULATION. 



The Bible places the date of creation at 
about 4(XK) P.. C. Latter-day geologi-ts 
figure anywhere from 10,000 to 100,000 
years, and John Fiske, one of the most emi- 
nent authorities, gives good reasons for sup- 
posing human beings to have existed for 
half a million years. 

To-day we estimate the earth's popula- 
tion at 1,500,000,000 — a very generous esti- 
mate. < )ne-half of this population is fe- 
male. Experience tables show that there 
are three generations in every century. 
From these slender data it is but a simple 
mathematical calculation in progression 
toward the year in which the first pair of 
human beings appeared on earth. Upon 
this hypothesis the year 50,000 B. C. brings 
us down to about 3,000,000 people. If we 
accept and from this point retrace our steps 
to the present day — say 1900 A. D. — we ar- 
rive at the conclusion that a total of 72,000,- 
000,000 human beings have been born to 
date, of which number only about 1,500,- 
000,000 are alive to-day. 

1 lad every individual body been preserved 
in a casket measuring on an average 6x2x2 
feet, all could have been buried in ( Okla- 
homa's area of 38,700 square miles, and a 
liberal allowance of space for paths and 
driveways been left. Or all the coffins could 
have been dropped into Lake Superior with- 
out endangering the inhabitants of its 
shores on account of a possible tidal wave. 
The present living population of 1,500,000,- 
000 persons can find standing room on Sta- 
ten Island, in Xew York harbor. 

In the State of Texas you could place each 
man, woman and child. 70 feet apart, giving 
each 4 n 00 septate feet of land — room suffi- 
cient for house, cattle and vegetable garden. 

Within the limits of these United States 
each living human being to-day could have 
65,000 square feet, or they could be placed 
255 linear feet apart. 

The next time you hear anybody talking 
"overpopulation" you can shut him up by 
telling him that you can pack the wdiole lot 
— 1,500.000,000 people — in a box measuring 
2000 feet each way. — Xew York World. 






Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



t^^* 



On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions) 



*^^* 



SEAMEN AND WAR RISKS. 



It is provided by the Merchant Shipping 
Act, 1894, that the owner or master of a 
foreign-going ship shall pay each seaman 
the whole of the wages due to him within 
two days of the time when he lawfully 
leaves the ship at the end of his engage- 
ment ; and that in the event of his wages, or 
any part of them, not being paid as pro- 
vided, then, unless the delay is due to the 
act or default of the seaman, or to any rea- 
sonable dispute as to liability, or to any 
other cause not being the wrongful act or 
default of the owner or master, the sea- 
man's wages shall continue to run and be 
payable until the time of the final settle- 
ment thereof. 

- In December, 1904, a crew signed articles 
to serve on board the steamship Franklyn, 
on a "voyage of not exceeding three years' 
duration to any ports or places within the 
limits of 75 degrees north and 60 degrees 
south latitude, commencing at Glasgow, 
proceeding thence to Hong Kong via Barry, 
and (or) any other ports within the above 
limits, trading in any rotation, and to end 
at such port in the United Kingdom or Con- 
tinent of Europe (within home trade limits) 
as may be required by the master." They 
sailed from Cardiff with a cargo of coals, 
and reached Hong Kong on February 20th, 
1905. War had been going on between Rus- 
sia and Japan for more than a twelvemonth. 
At Hong Kong the men were told for the 
first time that the Franklyn was to pro- 
ceed with her cargo of coal to Sasebo, a 
naval base of Japan. Coal had been declared 
contraband of war by both belligerents, and 
accordingly a vessel carrying coal to Sasebo 
was liable to be captured, if the Russians 
could capture her, and to be sent to a Rus- 
sian port for adjudication. More than that, 
under the practice adopted by Russia in that 
war, she ran the risk of being sunk instead 
of being taken into port. If, therefore, the 
men had gone on with the ship to Sasebo 
they ran the risk of losing their employ- 
ment and their kit, of being cast adrift in a 
Russian port during war, and of their ship 
being destroyed on the high seas, and them- 
selves exposed to whatever danger that 
might involve. The master claimed that 
the men were bound to go on to Sasebo. 
The men refused, but offered to go if the 
captain would make good their wages and 
clothes till the time they arrived in the 
United Kingdom in the event of the ship 
being taken or sunk. The master said his 
owners would not allow him to do that. 
Upon this the master threatened the men 
that if they refused to proceed he would 
take them before the harbor-master, who is 
also port magistrate. This was done. The 
men still refusing to sail for Sasebo, the 
harbor-master sentenced them to ten weeks' 
imprisonment, and they were imprisoned ac- 
cordingly, with circumstances of much hard- 
ship and indignity. The wages they had 
already earned were not paid them. After 
serving their sentence they were sent home 
as distressed seamen, and reached London 
on July 15th, 1905. They then brought an 
action against the owners of the Frank- 



lyn for malicious prosecution, wages and 
maintenance, and damages. 

In the King's Bench Division the men ob- 
tained judgment for their wages, but only 
up to the time they arrived in England ; and 
it was held that they could not recover for 
malicious prosecution. There were cross- 
appeals ; and the Court of Appeal decided 
that the men were justified in refusing to 
proceed to Sasebo, and that they were en- 
titled to wages from the date of their en- 
gagement up to the final settlement of their 
claims by the decision of the Court of Ap- 
peal, i. e., December 21st, 1906, and also to 
maintenance from February 20th, 1905, up 
to the same date. The claim in respect to 
malicious prosecution was abandoned. 

The owners appealed to the House of 
Lords. The House of Lords held that the 
treatment of the men had been illegal 
throughout ; that the master had no right 
whatever to require the seamen to take war 
risks, or to proceed on any voyage other 
than a commercial voyage with commercial 
risks; that the sentence of imprisonment 
passed upon them was illegal ; that the re- 
fusal to pay them their wages ac Hong 
Kong was illegal ; that the seamen had law- 
fully left their ship at Hong Kong, for they 
were compelled by law against their will to 
leave it ; and that consequently the decision 
of the Court of Appeal should be upheld. — 
Palace Shipping Company vs. Caine and 
Others. House of Lords, May 30th, June 
3rd and 5th, and July 29th, 1907. 



BRITISH TREATMENT OF INDIANS. 



When Bombay (at present the second 
largest city in the British Empire) had been 
acquired, the Government of England, in 
granting it to the British East India Com- 
pany, wrote the following words under the 
date of March 27, 1669: 

"And it is declared that all persons being 
His Majesty's subjects inhabiting within the 
said island and their children and their pos- 
terity born within the limits thereof shall be 
deemed free denizens and natural subjects 
as if living and born in England." 

Queen Victoria, in her letter to Lord 
Derby, Governor-General of India, com- 
manding him to write the proclamation, 
said : 

"And point out the privileges which the 
Indians will receive in being placed on an 
equality with the subjects of the British 
Crown, and prosperity flowing in the train 
of civilization." 

Well, these beautiful declarations have 
been consistently ignored by the autocrats 
of India, for we Hindus have no voice what- 
ever in the fiscal administration of India. 
It is known in this country that after nearly 
150 years of British rule in India the peo- 
ple of that country are not permitted to 
carry arms, that no native is appointed to 
any responsible position in the Army and 
that he is excluded from the Navy. 

Charles E. T. Stuart-Linton in his letter 
of August 12th says: "In 1870 competitive 
examinations for the Indian civil service 
were opened to Indians as well as to Euro- 
peans." These words provide a good illus- 
tration of a statement apparently true being 



used to hide the truth from the thinking 
world. These examinations are held only in 
England and under conditions which prac- 
tically shut out the Indians from civil serv- 
ice. Repeatedly have the Indian leaders 
requested the British Government to hold 
these civil service examinations simulta- 
neously in India, but an emphatic negative 
answer has invariably been returned. 

The highest appointments in the civil serv- 
ice are almost entirely held by English- 
men. The highest revenue official in the 
district is called the district collector, and 
he draws a salary of $8000 a year; of such 
high salaried officials in South India only 
three or four are natives. In Ceylon, where 
political conditions are much the same as in 
South India, during the last twenty years 
only three natives have been appointed to 
the civil service, and none during the last 
six years ; whereas about a dozen English- 
men enter the civil service every year. Mr. 
Gokhale, a member of the Indian Viceroy's 
Council, and one of the most level-headed 
Indian politicians, says: 

"Our net revenue is about £44,000,000 
sterling. Of this very nearly one-half is 
eaten up by the army. The home charges, 
exclusive of their military portion, absorb 
nearly one-third. These two between them 
account for about thirty-four out of forty- 
four millions. Then more than £3,000,000 
is paid to European officials in civil employ. 
This leaves only about £7,000,000 at the 
disposal of the Government to be applied to 
other purposes. Can any one who realizes 
what this means wonder that the Govern- 
ment spends only a miserable three-quarters 
of a million out of the State funds on the 
education of the people? Japan came under 
the influence of Western ideas only forty 
years ago, and yet already she is in line with 
the most advanced nations of the West in 
matters of education, the State finding funds 
for the education of every child of school- 
going age. We have now been a hundred 
years under England's rule and yet to-day 
four villages out of every five are without 
a schoolhouse and seven children out of 
every eight are allowed to grow up in ig- 
norance and darkness. Militarism, service 
interests and the interests of English cap- 
italists, all take precedence to-day of the 
true interests of the Indian people in the 
administration of the country." — S. C. K. 
Rutnam, President Central College, Colom- 
bo, Ceylon, in New York Sun. 



The Mitsu Bishi Engine Works, Nagasaki, 
Japan, has decided to construct a floating dock 
with a capacity for vessels of 12,000 tons' dis- 
placement. The dock will cost $750,000 gold. 
About 5,000 tons of iron material are required 
for its construction. Of this amount 4,000 
tons have been ordered from the Edamitsu 
Iron Foundry, and the rest from an English 
iron foundry. It will be completed the year 
after next. 



Do your shopping early and give the Retail 
Clerks an opportunity to enjoy a fair measure 
of home life. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



t 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




John Reed was convicted by a jury 
at Vancouver, B. C., on Octobi 
and sentenced to six months for par- 
ticipating m the recent anti Oriental 
riots. 

Governor Johnson of Minnesota is 
out with a formal statement that he is 
nut a candidate for the nomination for 
President. He also states that he 
knows that William J. Bryan is a 
c; ndidate. 

The Cleveland (O.) Electric Rail 
way mi October 2 began selling street- 
car tickets at the rate of seven lor 25 
cents. The experiment is made to 
S.iOW that the company is in earnest in 
its effort to give practically 3] j cent 
fare. 

Former Mayor T. 1'.. Black, of Ken- 
ton, <)., pleaded guilty on September 
.?(), to forgery and embezzlement and 
was sentenced to serve five years in 
the penitentiary. He was charged 
with embezzlement of $30.(X)U trust 
funds of Columbus clients. 

The Union Pacific Railroad in the 
Federal Court, at Omaha, Neb., on 
October 4, pleaded guilty and con- 
fessed judgment to the indictments of 
violations of the Safety- Appliance 
laws. The confession carries with it 
a fine of $100. 

Leading officials of several of the 
large life insurance companies were 
summoned by District Attorney Je- 
rome, of New York, on October 1 to 
appear before the criminal branch of 
the State Supreme Court to plead to 
indictments found against them by the 
Grand Jury. 

1 'ilicial figures disclose the fact that 
of the 6000 Japanese who recently ar- 
rived in Vancouver, B. C, 1600 have 
got across the boundary line to Se- 
attle, Portland and San Francisco. 
These include 1000 who came from 
Honolulu and who could not enter the 
United States direct. 

The Kansas railroads on October 

4 withdrew their request to the State 
Hoard of Railway Commissioners to 
be allowed to charge 3 cents a mile 
for passengers who fail to buy tickets. 
It is assumed that the railroads in- 
tend to take the matter into their own 
hands and charge the 3 cents regard- 
less. 

Secretary Straus, of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor, and 
Frank P. Sargent, Commissioner of 
Immigration, have determined to elim- 
inate tlie "white slave" traffic from 
the United States, if possible. Women 
less than three years in the United 
States will be rounded up and de- 
ported. 

It is rumored that the Cong 
sional Immigration Commission which 
visited Europe last summer will rec- 
ommend that all immigrants to Amer- 
ica be required to show a certificate 
from the United States Consul at the 
port of embarkation as to their good 
character. 

The passenger traffic managers of 
the transcontinental lines have decided 
to continue the issuance of clergy- 
men's permits. Greater restrictions. 
however, will he thrown about these 
rates, and they will cost an average 
of $5 more per year in territory west 
of the Missouri River than heretofore. 

The new foreign postal rate, adopted 
at the last Universal Postal Conven- 
tion in Rome, became effective on 
October 1. foreign postage is now 

5 cents for the first ounce and 3 cents 
for each additional ounce. The new- 
rate applies to all countries except 
Canada, Mexico and Cuba, in which 
the domestic rate continues. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing" Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL- BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 
We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS. 

WIEDWALO BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Anjeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices We buy direct from Kentucky 
I ilstllleiiea and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M 



B RO W IN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 18S8, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



him. 



-5a_ 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., JACOB OjLSj&N 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 
Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS 


A. 


LUCAS 


Undertaker and Embalmer 




Fourth 


Street. 


Between 


Front 


and Beacon Sts. 




SAN 1 


="EDRO. 



FOR FURNISHED CABINS 

GO TO 

ALEX. MUHLBERG 

370 3d STREET, bet. Centre and Mesa 

$1 per Week or $3 per Month and Up 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Anderson, -988 Kulman, G. II. 
Anderson, -897 . ic^istered letter) 

Anelsson, Karl B. Kristensen. Peter 

Anderson, Charles Kennedy, J. 

Anderson, V. -1240 Kishl, Hans 

Andersen, -1305 Karlson. Gustaf 

Anderson, AJbln Kc-rmagoret, Anatel 



Anderson, -1118 
Andersson, Patrick 
Brusbard, 1402 
Behrens, F. 
Bortrom, Wm. 
Bade, Ak-x. 
Benson, Ray 
Bouton, Eugene 



K. ck, Albert 
Lindow, E. 
Lukkima, Mr. 
Lind, Gus A. 
Lutter, Franz 

>lm, Nestor 
Luckman, Tlun- 
Larsen, Air. 



Ch. A. -116G Larsen, P. -1179 
ird, .Arthur Laisen, Eivind 

Bundesen, Jens Louis. Coadon 

Brander, W. -138»Louncke, A. -1821 



John K 

Bee, Colin 
Bergersen, Alf. 
Benreu, John E. 
BJorkholm, G. A. 
Bergstrom, Fram: 
Blom, Fllip 
Brussel, Edward 
i^er, A. H. 
Uergh, Borge 
Carlson, G. A 
Carlson, c. E. 



Lewis, John 
Larsen, Axel 
Llndholm, C. 

. i ! timer 
Lundstedt, C. 
Lindroos, Askar A. 
l.aine, Frank 
Le i rOff, Syh Ian 
Maack, Hans 
Markman, H. 
Martinson. Au 
903Martin, John B, 



Christiansen, LudvlgMaim' 



Christensen, M. 
Cohrt, Herman 
< ollberg, Chas. 
I 'nristoffersen, A. 
1 loci inc. Louis 
Christiansen, -901 
Cooley, J. II. B. 
Cm re, Pierre 
Carnaghan, Wm. 
Cook, Harry 
Carlson, Aksel 



Miller, James 
Mahring \V. 
McDonald, N". 
Maibohm, Hans 
Munroe, H. G. 
McLeod 

Mikkelsen. B. -1445 
Mannltrom, W. 
Mattson, J . 
Miller, James 
Magel. Fred 



Christensen, Christ Maimqvlst, J. 
Carlson, Waldemar Martyn, Leroy 
Chamberlin, L. C. Mi-rmussen, Carl 
Christensen, l.udwig Mikkelsen, Peter 
I 'anielsen, Hans H. Monterus, John 
mi, Alesandro Mikkelsen. A. S. 
1'ittmer, Otto Nass, Paddy 

unison, Gustav ..ilson, Daniel 



Hunwoodie, H. 
I ahlberg, J. 
F,liasson, Edward 
r^keland, Sigurd 
Eggers, John 
lidelhagen, P. F. 
I ii i son, Johan 
I'olvig, J. A. 



Nilson, -737 
Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Nilsen, N. A. -734 
Neilsen, George 
Nilsen, Peter 
Neerheim, Th. P. 
Nordin, M. 
Neilsen. W. 



I'riedrikson, Andrew Nystrorn, Ragnar 
K >i. strom, Oskar Osterhais, R. 



l-\ -rubers, Gustaf 
i larder, Oscar 

(.ustafson, Oskar 
Goethebeur, Ch. 
Gallen, Paul 



Olsen, Guttorn 
' >lsen, N. 
Oisen, Olaf 
Olson, W. -668 
Olsen, A. -759 



Gundersen, Andreas Oysteth, S. 



< iallen, R. 
Guerin, Le Port 
Gunmanreu,, John 
Golf, Steve 
Griel, Bernhardt 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Georges. Ansela 
Gustaf sson, J. E. 
tan, J. G. 



Osterhuis. J. 
Paulsen, -606 
Petterson, Axel 
Petersen, Charley 
Paris, Walter 
Petersen. C. -721 
Pedersen. L. -1321 
Fc-ttersen, K. H. -903 
Pedersen, -896 



tltegistered letter) Fettersen, 1943 
I laalt-mitter, Karl Pedersen. Alf 
I, Karl G. 



Penney, Mathem 

B, J, Li. -921 

Petersen, E. -101 
Person, A. -1192 

I.. 
Perleny. Emil 
Porter, Chas. 
Pledvache, Emile 



Henning, Gustav 

Hansen. Harry 

Haker. Matt 

Hansen, Chas. E. 

Hollti, John W. 

Holman, Georse M. 

Heesche, Heiniich 

llaldorsen, Herman Pederson, John 

Hohman, H. Perkins, D. H. 

Hansen, -1073 Pi iersen, Jack 

Henriksen. Hans Rauen, W. 

Hansen, Hialmar Runge, Helrich 
I Hohman, Carl -1767 Reulund, Andrew 

Hansen. Christian Rheinhard. Wilhelm 

i nansen, F. Rush, Fred 

(Registered letter) Richardson, H. E. 

i lansen, -1*54 Rytha, M. O. 

Helms, W. (Reg. letter P. O.) 

( li. gisterdd letter) Runge, H. 

Henrides, G. Reay, Stephen A. 

ii-mson, J. A. Rasmussen, R. 

Hansen, L. Rice, Patrie B. 

Holmstrom, CharlesReynolds. Thomas 

Halvorsen, -595 Rash, H. 

Herman, Fred Renolds, August 

II llst-n, Halvor Smith, Aksel F. 

Hendriksen. G. H. Schaffler, A. 



Hansen, Chr. F. 
Hudson, Mat 
lvL-rsen, John 
(Package) 



(Reg. letter P. O.) 
Scarborda, Mario 
Smith, Axel 
Soransen, -1664 



.It'hannesen, Hans H.Singer, J. 
i lansen, Albert Samuelsen, Otto 
Johansen, F. W. Soto, Pedro 
Johansen, C. M. -1593Soderstrom, O. 
Jungjohan, John Banders, Charles 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



FRED S V END SEN 



UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



The James SI. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



Johansson, Nils 
Jensen, P. -695 
Johansson, -1576 
Jensen, -734 
Johansen, G. 
Junker, Paul 
Johnson, John 



Stahn. M. 
Sorensen, Michael 
Svensson, Ture 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Scheel, Johannes 
Schmidt, F. 
Steen, Hans 



Johannesen, A. -1557 Schannon, H. C. 
Johansen, A. F. -1287Sverkesen, L. C 
Jensen. H. -1311 Schulz, Chris 

Johansen, Theodor Schmidt, E. -1670 



Johnsen, -1281 
Jensen, Chris 
Juhnke, William 
Johansen, 1364 



Selzer, M. 
Samrio, S. 
Svedstrup, E. 
Sverkesen, Lou 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, -906 
Andersson, A. H. 
Askerlund, Daniel O. 
Anderson, S. 
Andersson, Adolf 
Ardelean, J. 
Absolonsen, Ole M. 



Andersen, Gustaf 
Aaquist, Thorvald 
Arnesen, Karl A. 
Albertsen, Johannes 
Andersen, P. -858 
Andersson, -1229 
Antonsen, Marlus 



Johnsen, J. -1050 Svensson, Nicolaus 

Jenssen, J .Kristen Strandqvist, Louis 

Johanssen, Aug. F. Schatze, Otto 

Jensen, -734 Svendren, -1050 

Johnsen, Alf. Staff, Louis 

Johansson, Hialmar Skugstad, Christian 

Jorgensen, Walter Salberg, Oskar 

Johansson, N. Aug. Tyrholm, Johan 

fohansen, -1462 Thompson, Stephen 

Johnsen, Gust. Tobiason. Johan 

laansen, Hans Tingleman, E. 

Jensen, Peter Tillman. Andrew 

fohansson, -1486 



Johansson, H. 
Jensen, -1412 
Johansen, 1287 
Jensen, P. 



Tipp, Joseph 
Torgersen, R. 
Ulke. E. 

Underhill. Geo. A. 
Voreland, G. K. 



(Registered letter) Williams. R. E. 



on, K. G. 
ohansen, Carl 
Johanson, -1452 



Weiss, Charles 
Wahlers, W. 
Wordehofl. Alfred 



Johanssen, A. -1557 Westln, J. A. 



K'lmgstrom, G. 
Kirsteln John 
K'ruse. Ed. 
Klinthorn. Martin 
Karsberg, C. 
Kamp, G. H. 



Wilson, J. 
Washburn. Thomas 
Wldos. Stefan 
Winseus. Peter 
Yetwel, Fred 









COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Secretary of the Navy Metcalf and Admiral 
Brownson announce that the fleet will be in 
readiness to start for the Pacific Coast on De- 
cember 15th. 

Captain George Simpson, of the British steam- 
er Garscube, which arrived at San Francisco on 
October 7, was fined $500 by the Collector of the 
Customs for having failed to file a list of the 
wines and liquors on board. 

The United States Attorney-General on Octo- 
ber 10 rendered an opinion to the effect that the 
new law does not require the collection of Light- 
house and Tonnage dues on coal sent to Pacific 
ports for the Navy in foreign bottoms. 

A telegram from London received at San 
Francisco on October 9 conveys the intelligence 
that the British steamer Strathendrick, from 
Newport News bound to San Francisco, has put 
into Valparaiso with her machinery disabled. 

The following changes of masters are an- 
nounced at San Francisco: Ship Aryan, M. Brig- 
ham, vice A. O. Sorensen; schooner Santiago, P. 
Kelly, vice P. S. Farley; schooner Roderick Dhu, 
P. S. Farley, vice Frank M. Berg; steamer Isle- 
ton, H. J. Atthowe, vice E. Atthowe. 

John Charles Peterson, the vessel lookout at 
Diamond Head, Honolulu, died at the Queen's 
Hospital in that city on September 27, of chronic 
nephritis. For twenty-eight years he had been 
employed by the Territory to watch for and 
report the arrival of vessels at that port. 

The United States Army cable ship Burnside 
will shortly return to Seattle from Alaskan wa- 
ters. It has been decided to postpone the laying 
of the Katelta cable, for which everything was 
intended, until spring, on account of serious 
questions concerning cable landings. 

Intense anxiety is being aroused among ship- 
ping men as to the whereabouts or fate of the 
Japanese steamer, Koan Maru, bound from Moji, 
Japan, to San Francisco with a cargo of coal, 
and it is thought by many experienced men that 
she foundered with all on board in the ty- 
phoon which raged along her track three weeks 
ago. 

The Gualala Steamship Company, of San Fran- 
cisco, has filed a suit against Notley Brothers, 
of San Jose, in the United States District Court 
•at San Francisco. The suit is for the recovery 
of $762 alleged to be due on a freight bill for a 
cargo of tan bark shipped aboard the Gualala on 
September 6 from Shelter Cove, Humboldt 
county, to Benicia. 

Collector of the Port Stratton, of San Fran- 
cisco, has received a telegram from the Commis- 
sioner of Navigation authorizing him not to col- 
lect Tonnage tax on coal brought to that port in 
foreign bottoms for Government use and to re- 
fund charges that had already been collected, 
pending a decision as to whether or not it was 
legal to collect such a tax. 

The Pacific Coast Company's newly repaired 
steamer Queen sailed from San Francisco on 
October 10 for Los Angeles on her first voyage 
since she was renovated. The Queen is a very 
much improved steamer and by some is declared 
to be the best-looking of the company's fine fleet. 
Captain H. C. Thomas, formerly in command of 
the State of California, is in charge of the Queen. 

Captain C. E. Ferris, of Seattle, has been ap- 
pointed assistant marine superintendent to the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Captain 
Hall, who was for some time acting assistant ma- 
rine superintendent, will take the steamer State 
of California to Seattle, where she will undergo 
extensive repairs. The repairs include the in- 
stallation of new boilers, and when completed 
the State of California will be almost a new 
steamer. 

Barring unforeseen accidents or delay, gold 
and treasure to the amount of $1,575,000 which 
was lost when the ship Golden Gate sank in 1862 
off the coast of Mexico near Mazanilla will be 
recovered during the first months of next year. 
A number of Eastern capitalists, residing mostly 
in Philadelphia, have formed a company for this 
purpose and their representative, C. W. Johnston, 
is now in San Francisco making preparations for 
carrying on the work in the southern waters. 

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's 
steamer President, which at the present time is 
in Alaskan waters, was in communication with 
the wireless station at Point Loma, Cal., on 
October 6. The distance was so great and the 
atmospheric conditions of such a nature, how- 
ever, that very little could be understood. It 
was finally learned that she was about 1000 
miles north of Cape Flattery, or 2200 miles 
north of San Diego. 

With 200 passengers and 2,000 tons of cargo 
on board, the steamer Spokane arrived at San 
Francisco on October 11 from Seattle. This will 
be the last trip of the Spokane to San Francisco 
for some time. She will return to Seattle and go 
into Moran's dry dock for extensive repairs. She 
is to be cut in two, lengthened and will be made 
into a thoroughly new vessel. The repairs are 
expected to take some months, and when they 
are completed she will be put in commission be- 
tween San Francisco and Alaska. 

The British steamer Newington, Captain 
Charles Polkingthorne, bound from Hull, Eng- 



land, to Vancouver, B. C, put into San Fran- 
cisco on October 2 for coal. The Newington 
was for many years used as trawler in the North 
Sea and at Iceland, and has been sold to go into 
the towing business up North. The little steamer, 
which is only sixty tons register, left Hull June 
23, and her last port of call was Callao, where 
she coaled. The little steamer is destined to tow 
lumber un and down the Coast. 

Plans have been finished for building two new 
first-class up-to-date steamers to go On the San 
Francisco-Portland run in the Harriman in- 
terests. The arrangements provide for the build- 
ing of the steamers at Philadelphia yards. Both 
will be of 3000 tons register, the size of steamer 
which has been decided upon as the most suit- 
able for the Portland and Astoria trade as far as 
it is at present developed. Both of these steam- 
ers will be fitted with wireless apparatus and it 
is intended that they shall be completed within 
twelve months. 

It was announced at Seattle, Wash., on Octo- 
ber 4 that, beginning November 1, the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will inaugurate a di- 
rect steamship service between San Diego and 
Seattle. The steamers Umatilla and Senator will 
be placed on the run. Hitherto shipments from 
San Diego have been transshipped at San Fran- 
cisco. The new steamship route is expected to 
save 80 cents a ton in marketing California fruit 
on Puget Sound, besides giving quicker service. 
This is the first time a direct steamship service 
between the two points has been afforded. 

A telegram from London conveys the informa- 
tion that the new lumber schooner Olsen and 
Mahoney, which put into Rio J-ineiro in distress 
on October 8, had broken four blades of her pro- 
peller and that her air pump valves had broken. 
The Olsen and Mahoney was built at Philadel- 
phia and only recently finished. Both on her 
trials and on the voyage down the Atlantic 
Coast as far as the West Tndies she had given 
every satisfaction and done all that was asked of 
her. It is thought that the schooner must have 
struck some wreckage along the Brazilian coast. 
After a passage occupying seventy-seven days, 
the new steam tug General Hubbard, Captain 
Lord, arrived at San Francisco on October 7 
from Norfolk, Va. The General Hubbard was 
built at Philadelphia for the Hammond Lumber 
Company of San Franci?co. and is to be used 
for towing lumber. She was built at the yards 
of Neafie & Levy, and is of 400 tons register, 140 
feet long, 29 feet beam and 16 feet deep. Her 
engines are of 1000 horse-power, giving a speed 
of fourteen knots. Dennis Hunter, first assist- 
ant engineer, died of heat on September 30 and 
was buried on the same day. Deceased was a 
native of Livrpool, Eng. 

T. M. Laffin of Yokohama, Japan, filed a suit 
in libel in the United States District Court at 
San Francisco on October 7 against J. J. Moore 
& Company, shipping and commission mer- 
chants, of San Francisco, to recover $5955 dam- 
ages for neglect and the loss of part of a cargo 
of logs. The suit arises out of a contract made 
with Moore's agents, Bredhoff Nelson Company, 
of San Francisco, to load on the. British vessel 
Vermont, in October. 1906, while in the port of 
Mororan, Japan, 500,000 feet of oak logs. The 
cargo was to be loaded at the r 1 1 e of 150,000 feet 
per day. While the loading was in progress a 
storm came up and a raft of logs was broken and 
420 logs were lost. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as issued at 
San Francisco on October 11: Ship Guiana, 207 
days from Mobile for Bahia Blanca. 90 per cent; 
La Tour d'Avergne, 132 days from Rochester for 
San Francisco, 8 per cent; Medea, 223 davs from 
Stettin for San Francisco, 37 per cent; Thomas- 
ina, 163 days from Port Pirie for Falmouth, 6 per 
cent; Haddon Hall, 161 days from Geelong for 
Falmouth, 6 per cent; Silberhorn, 121 days from 
Newcastle, Australia, for Pisagua, 60 per cent; 
Louise, 124 days from Bremen for San Francisco, 
11 per cent; Arthur Sewall, 192 days from Phila- 
delphia for Seattle, 15 per cent; Adolph Olrig, 
185 days from New York for San Francisco, 15' 
per cent; Gulf Stream, 196 days from Flushing 
for Port Townsend, 6 per cent; H. Hackficld. 151 
days from Leith to Honolulu. 8 per cent; Koan 
Maru, 37 days from Moji to San Francisco, 22 per 
cent; Glenogil, 148 days from Liverpool to San 
Diego, 10 per cent; Port Caledonia, 148 days from 
Antwerp to Tacoma, 10 per cent; Dirigo, 130 days 
from Honolulu to Delaware Breakwater, 10 per 
cent; Lauriston, 114 days from Tumbrv Bay to 
Falmouth, 6 per cent. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards, 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1V&A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitouias St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y.. 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitouias St 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y.. 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 

INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. III., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub- Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
•CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR, Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Mgr. 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, ----- $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1907. 



THE STRAUS RULING. 



The rilling of Secretary Straus ( published 
in this issue), under which the employment 
of Chinese crews on the vessels of the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company is declared legal, 
marks another victory for that corporation. 
For a number of years the action of the Mail 
Company in employing Chinese crews has 
been actively opposed by the organized sea- 
men of the United States, supported by the 
labor movement of the country. Numerous 
protests have been made to the authorities at 
Washington, based upon facts which seemed 
to constitute a conclusive case against the 
Company. In each instance the result has 
been the same, namely, a ruling more or less 
plausible and more or less evasive, but none 
the less clearly denying the protests of the 
seamen. A review of these protests and rul- 
ings forces the conviction that the Pacific 
Mail Company, like the proverbial King, can 
do no wrong. It would seem that however 
general the laws concerning Immigration, 
Contract Labor and Chinese Exclusion may 
be, however strictly these laws may be en- 
forced in other cases, they do not apply to the 
Pacific Mail Company. 

The ruling of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor in the present instance is typical 
of the reasoning processes by which the au- 
thorities reach their conclusions in all such 
cases. The latest protest of the Sailors' 
Union is based upon a considerable body of 
law, reinforced by numerous court decisions, 
bearing out the maxim that an American ship 
is "a part of the territory of the United 
States," and as such subject to the laws ap- 
plicable to the country at large. In addition, 
the protest of the Sailors' Union is strength- 
ened by the recent ruling of the same Depart- 
ment in the case of the steamer Lyra, in which 
it was held that a vessel manned by Chinese 
can not enter the coastwise trade. The Lyra 
had been engaged in the transpacific trade, 
and her proposed entrance into the coastwise 
trade was practically but an incident of, or 
break in. the former trade. The chief differ- 
ence between the cases of the Lyra and the 
Pacific Mail Company is that the Lyra was 
engaged but temporarily in the coastwise 



trade, while the vessels of the Mail Company 
are engaged regularly in that trade. Yet the 
Department prohibits the employment of Chi- 
nese in the ease of the Lyra and permits, even 
justifies, that practice in the case of the Mail 
Company. 

Secretary Straus does not attempt to an- 
swer all the points raised by the protest, but 
upon one point he is fairly specific. In deny- 
ing the contention that the law in the matter 
of coastwise navigation should be applied to 
the vessels of the Pacific Mail Company car- 
rying passengers, mail and freight between 
San Francisco and the Hawaiian Islands, Sec- 
retary Straus, while admitting that the Islands 
are included in the coastwise trade, insists that 
"the vessels do not cease to be 'in the foreign 
trade' during any part of their voyage, hence, 
although they are incidentally engaged in the 
coastwise or domestic trade, so long as they 
preserve their status as vessels 'in the foreign 
trade," it would seem that the privilege of en- 
gaging foreign crews still inures to them by 
the plain terms of the Act." The position here 
stated is likely to have important results — re- 
sults not intended and evidently not thought 
of — if carried to its logical conclusion. If the 
fact that an American vessel engaged in the 
foreign trade calls at the Hawaiian Islands 
does not alter her status as a vessel "in the 
foreign trade," what becomes of the law 
which prohibits foreign vessels from entering 
the trade between the United States and the 
Islands en route to and from foreign ports? 
Under the present law foreign vessels are pro- 
hibited from carrying passengers, mail or 
freight from one port of the United States 
to another. In other words, foreign vessels 
are limited to the foreign trade. If the ruling 
of Secretary Straus, which declares in so 
many words that the nature of a voyage "in 
the foreign trade" is not altered by the fact 
that a vessel calls at a coastwise port en route 
— if that ruling be sound as to the vessels of 
the Pacific Mail Company, it ought to be 
equally sound as to all other vessels, foreign 
as well as American. 

Thus it would appear that Secretary Straus 
has proved more than he intended to prove, 
or at least more than is desirable from the 
point of view of protection to the coastwise 
trade. However, there need be little fear that 
the ruling in question will work any serious 
results as a precedent. The only precedent 
that weighs with the Department of Commerce 
and Labor is the precedent of reversal, the 
precedent by which that Department reverses 
itself whenever expediency demands such ac- 
tion. Foreign shipowners need not lay the 
flattering unction to their souls that Secretary 
Straus will follow his present ruling so as to 
grant them permission to invade the coast- 
wise trade. Decisions and rulings rendered 
in the affairs of the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company are evidently intended to apply in 
the case of that concern only. In all other 
cases the letter and spirit of the laws must 
be scrupulously observed. The effort of the 
American seamen to compel the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company to respect the law of the 
land will be continued until it is crowned with 
success, as it certainly will be, sooner or later. 



Demand the label of the Cigarmakers and 
Tobacco Workers when purchasing cigars or 
tobacco. 



GIBBONS ON THE UNIONS. 



For fac-similes of union labels see the Jour- 
nal's ad columns. 



Cardinal Gibbons, in an article in the ( >c- 
tober issue of Putnam's Monthly, offers some 
advice, mostly good, to the trade-unions. 
Possibly the highest compliment that can be 
paid to the Cardinal is to say that his views 
are merely an indorsement of the views long 
held and quite generally, we might say uni- 
formly, practised by organized labor. The 
Cardinal says : 

[take for granted that till unions and other 
societies of American laboring men are disposed 

to array themselves on the side of peace and order 
and arc as strongly opposed to violations of the 

law as other citizens. Hence they should exert 
their influence to see that the laws arc upheld 
if they would maintain the respect with which 
they are regarded by their fellows. It is not only 
a question of patriotism, hut of self-interest which 
deeply concerns them. 

To this we say, "Quite true." We go fur- 
ther, and say that the unions are more strong- 
ly in favor of peace and order than certain 
other forms of organization, and do more to 
see that the laws are upheld than any other 
form of organization with which we are ac- 
quainted. Touching the boycott, the Cardinal 
says : 

Every man is free indeed to select the estab- 
lishment with which he wishes to deal, and in 
purchasing from one in preference to another 
he is not violating justice. Rut the case is altered 
when by a mandate of the society he is debarred 
from buying from a particular firm. Such a pro- 
hibition assails the liberty of the purchaser, and 
the rights of the seller, and is an unwarrantable 
invasion of the commercial privilege guaranteed 
by the Government to business concerns. 

Unite true, again. If, however, the rever- 
end gentleman means to suggest the use of 
compulsion in the prosecution of the boycott 
by the labor organizations, we should say that 
he has mistaken the true character of that 
proceeding. The trade-union uses no force 
in the matter; it advises, and if possible 
persuades, its members and friends t<i re- 
frain from dealing with the boycotted con- 
cern. If by his reference to "the commercial 
privilege guaranteed by the Government to 
business concerns," the Cardinal suggests a 
vested right in the patronage of the public, 
we must take issue with him and point out 
that the law does not, and can not, guarantee 
anything to a business concern, other than the 
protection of its property. The patronage of 
the public is not property, either legally or 
morally considered; consequently the boycott 
does not deprive a business concern of any- 
thing which either the Government or the pub- 
lic is bound to guarantee. The only proper 
guarantee of public patronage is public good- 
will, and that, in turn, is a thing that lies with 
the public itself. 

Touching the question of strikes, the Car- 
dinal says : 

It would be a vast stride in the interests of 
peace, and of the laboring classes, if the policy 
of arbitration which is now gaining favor for ,1k 
settlement of international quarrels, were also 
availed of for the adjustment of disputes between 
capital and labor. Many blessings would result 
from the adoption of this method; for, while 
strikes, as the name implies, are aggressive and 
destructive, arbitration is conciliatory and con- 
structive. The result in the former case is deter- 
mined by the weight of the purse, in the latter 
by the weight of the argument. 

No better or truer sentiment was ever ut- 
tered by Cardinal Gibbons or any one else. 
Nothing could be more in keeping with the 
sentiments of organized labor; also nothing 
could be more in keeping with the practice of 
that institution. The advice of Cardinal Gib- 
bons to organized labor is good — very good — 
so very good, in fact, that organized labor has 
been following it for many years. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



RULING ON CHINESE CREWS. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



is attributable largely to the fact that the mer- 
chant marine of this country, particularly its best 
vessels, are manned by Asiatics at wages that of- 
fer no inducements to Americans. Sailors are a 
necessity of all maritime nations, and this coun- 
try will never have sailors while they as a class 
are discriminated against, and laws that are made 
for all are so construed as to deprive them of 
their benefits. 

We respectfully submit, That the contracting 
with Chinese in Hongkong to serve on board of 
an American vessel is assisting and encouraging 
the importation of aliens within the United States, 
and a violation of Sec. 4 of the Act of March 3, 
1903, and that, The taking of such aliens on 
board of an American vessel, and more particular- 
ly the bringing of them into the harbors of Hono- 
lulu and San Francisco, is the bringing of them 
into the United States, and a violation of the 
provisions of Sec. 8 of the said Act. 

We further respectfully submit that, under the 
opinion of the Solicitor of date June 14, 1907. 
vessels so manned can not carry passengers, 
cargo, or mails between the port of San Fran- 
cisco and Honolulu, as that is coastwise trade. 

We therefore respectfully ask that your office 
take such action in the premises as the law and 
the facts require. 

Very respectfully yours, 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC, 

By A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

H. W. HUTTON, Counsel. 



To this communication the Department of 
Commerce and Labor replied as follows: 
Department of Commerce and Labor. 

Office of the Secretary, Washington. 

September 24, 1907. 
Sir: 

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your me- 
morial under date of July 31, 1907, protesting 
against the employment of Chinese sailors, fire- 
men and waiters by the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company, the contents of which have received my 
careful consideration, as well as that of the legal 
officers of this Department. 

The facts, as presented by you, appear to be 
that the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, an 
American corporation, is the owner of a number 
of steamships of American build and register en- 
gaged in the foreign trade of the United States 
between Hongkong and San Francisco, and that 
they are manned by alien Chinese crews shipped 
at Hongkong either for the round voyage or for 
a definite period of service terminating at Hong- 
kong. It further appears that the vessels in ques- 
tion, instead of plying directly between Hongkong 
and San Francisco, make Honolulu an intermediate 
port on the voyage in both directions, and besides 
carrying freight and passengers between Hong- 
kong and San Francisco, also carry freight and 
passengers between Honolulu and San Francisco. 
Under these circumstances it is urged that inas- 
much as the trade between Honolulu and San 
Francisco is a part of the coastwise or domestic 
commerce of the United States, and as the ves- 
sels in question are American vessels, the em- 
ployment of alien crews thereon constitutes a vio- 
lation of the Contract Labor laws, as embodied in 
sections 4 and 8 of the Immigration Act of March 
3, 1903, and of like numbered sections of the Act 
of February 20, 1907. 

Authority for the employment of alien crews 
on vessels engaged in the foreign trade is found 
in the Act of June 26, 1884 (3 Comp. Stat. 3072), 
and the Attorney-General, in an opinion under 
date of August 29, 1902 (24 Op. At. Gen. Ill), 
held that that Act conferred express authority 
upon the masters of American vessels engaged in 
the foreign trade to ship alien crews at foreign 
ports to serve for one or more round trips to and 
from the port of departure or for a definite time, 
whatever the destination, and that this statute 
was not repealed by the Contract Labor laws in 
force August 29, 1902, the date of the Attorney- 
General's opinion. Nor can it be said that the 
Act of June 26, 1884, has been repealed by any 
of the Immigration Acts of a later date, since the 
reasoning of the Attorney-General to the effect 
that no repeal was worked by the earlier Acts ap- 
plies with equal force in the case of the Acts of 
March 3, 1903, and February 20, 1907. 

But does the fact that the vessels in question 
arc not exclusively engaged in the foreign trade, 
but are also engaged in some measure in the 
coastwise trade (see Act of April 30, 1900, sec 98, 
2d supp., R. S. 1161) operate to withdraw from 
them the privileges granted by the Act of June 
26, 1884? In my opinion it does not. The priv- 
ilege is granted to "every master of a vessel en- 
gaged in the foreign trade" without qualification 
or restriction. In the case submitted by you the 
vessels do not cease to be "in the foreign trade" 
during any part of their voyage, hence, although 
they are incidentally engaged in the coastwise or 
domestic trade, so long as they preserve their 
status as vessels "in the foreign trade," it would 
seem that the privilege of engaging foreign crews 
still inures to them by the plain terms of the Act. 
Tn using the language embodied in the Act of 
1884, it is not reasonable to suppose that Congress 
intended that an American vessel engaged in 
trade between Hongkong, Honolulu and San 
Francisco, which for any reason is deprived of 
its crew at Hongkong and in consequences of 



which an alien crew is engaged at that port, 
should upon arrival at Honolulu be required to 
discharge her crew and provide for its return 
to Hongkong, and that the vessel should be 
delayed at Honolulu until a crew qualified to 
serve exclusively in the coastwise trade is se- 
cured in order to continue and complete the 
voyage to San Francisco, the port of destina- 
tion. 

Independently of the permission granted by 
the Act of June 26, 1884, it has been repeatedly 
held that seamen who are not citizens of the 
United States, employed in good faith in a for- 
eign country, are not within the scope of the 
Immigration Acts or the Chinese Exclusion laws 
so long as they follow the sea and come ashore 
in the ports of the United States only in con- 
nection with the business of their vessels or for 
the purpose of re-shipping. 

In a recent opinion of the Solicitor of this 
Department, under date of June 7, 1907, in which 
the applicability of the Immigration laws to 
seamen was considered at length and the various 
decisions of the courts were reviewed, it was 
held that where alien seamen, engaged in a for- 
eign port, who are bona-fide members of the 
crew of a vessel employed in the foreign trade, 
go ashore in a port of the United States only in 
connection with the duty of loading or unload- 
ing the vessel's cargo, the Immigration laws are 
not violated and that such action on the part 
of the seamen does not constitute a landing or 
entrance into the United States within the mean- 
ing of the Immigration laws. 

The present case differs materially from the 
one considered in the opinion of the Solicitor 
under date of June 14, 1907. The question there 
considered was whether alien seamen may be 
permitted to become members of the crew of a 
private American vessel engaged exclusively in 
the domestic commerce or coastwise trade of 
the United States, without complying with the 
requirements of the Immigration laws relating 
to the admission of aliens. In that case the 
vessel in question being engaged altogether in 
the coastwise trade or domestic commerce of 
the United States therefore did not fall within 
the class of vessels engaged in the foreign trade 
of the United States, as to which certain exemp- 
tions or privileges are allowed, as previously 
shown. 

In view of the foregoing I have to advise 
you that as vessels engaged in the foreign trade 
of the United States are permitted by express 
statute to engage foreign crews, and as the Im- 
migration Act has no application to foreign sea- 
men who are bona-fide members of the crew of 
a vessel engaged in the foreign trade so long as 
they remain with their vessel or follow the 
sea and make no attempt to enter the United 
States and become a part of its population, I am 
of the opinion that the employment of Chinese 
crews by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
as stated by you, constitutes no violation of the 
Immigration laws. To hold otherwise would, in 
my opinion, be a subversion both of the spirit 
and letter of the Act of June 26, 1884, and con- 
trary to my plain duty as an administrative offi- 
cer. Very respectfully, 

OSCAR S. STRAUS, 

Secretary. 
Mr. A. Furuseth, Secretary, Sailors' Union of 

the Pacific, San Francisco, California. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
\y 2 A Lewis St. . 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1907. 
Situation good. 

DANIEL SULLIVAN, Secretary. 
15 Union St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 8, 1907. 

Situation fair. H. P. Griffin was elected to 
represent the Union at the convention of the In- 
ternational Seamen's Union of America. 

II. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 

42 South St. 



DIED. 

Charles L. Nilsson, No. 951, a native of Sweden, 
aged 34, died at Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 3, 1907. 

Hjalmar Christian I.arsen, No. 1166, a native of 
Denmark, aged 24, died at Port Townsend, Wash., 
on Oct. 12, 1907. 

Sigurd Henry Lie, No. 1132, a native of Nor- 
way, aged 28, died at Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 6, 
1907. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 14, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., H. G. Lundberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. The Committee on Cem- 
etery reported that the remains of Comrade An- 
drew Kelner had been removed to the Union's 
plot. A committee was elected to prepare the 
ballot for the election of delegates to the con- 
vention of the International Seamen's Union of 
America. The election will take place in the 
regular meetings held at Headquarters and 
Branches on October 28. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping medium; 
men rather scarce. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping fair offshore; dull otherwise. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping and pros- 
pects fair; few men ashore. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping brisk. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping medium. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; situation unchanged. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 30, 1907. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cat., Oct. 10, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Wm. Brisco in the chair. Nomina- 
tions were made for delegates to the convention 
of the International Seamen's Union of America, 
to be held in Chicago, Dec. 2, 1907. The Quar- 
terly Finance Committee was elected. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 3, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 3, 1907. 
Shipping improving. 

CITAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 11, 1907. 

Regular meeting came to order at 8 p. m., 
Chas. Hammarin presiding. It was decided that 
the delegates to the Fishermen's conference in 
Seattle call in to Astoria, Or., on their way north 
to investigate the matter of the shipwrecked crew 
of the John Currier. A new Banking Committee 
was elected. The Finance Committee renortcd 
having found the accounts of the Union correct. 
I. N. HYLEN, Secretary. 

93 Steuart St. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, 111, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping fair. It was decided to send the 
ful 1 quota of 16 delegates to the convention of the 
international Seamen's Union of America. 

WM. PENJE, Secretary. 
143 West Madison St. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




NEW LAKES CHART. 



The United States Lake Survey lias just 
isued a chart of the Great Lakes region. 
It is printed in five colors on a scale of 
nineteen miles to the inch, and is intended 
for the use of navigators. The chart is big 
enough to show the whole Lake system, 
from Duluth and Chicago to Montreal, and 
the sheet, thirty-two by forty-six inches, is 
email enough to fit in a master's chart case. 

Some of the features making it valu- 
able for navigation and allied interests are: 

Primary sailing courses, with distances, 
are shown for all the Lakes. 

All water areas with three and one- 
half fathoms of water or less arc shown 
in blue. The deep water is in white, with 
the ten, twenty-five, fifty and 100-fathom 
depths indicated by dotted contour lines. 
All land areas are in buff tint. 

Lines showing the compass variations 
over the whole region are printed in red. 
Places where there is a local magnetic dis- 
turbance are conspicuously marked. 

Curves are given showing the lowest and 
highest monthly mean heights of the water 
in each of the Lakes, from I860 to 1906. 

Tables are incorporated giving lengths, 
terminal points, and locks with their di- 
mensions, of the United States and Cana- 
dian canals tributary to the Great Lakes. 

Tallies of drydocks on the Lakes, with 
dimensions, are given. 

Populations of cities and towns border- 
ing on the Lakes are indicated by varied 
symbols and graded scales of lettering. 

The law provides that these charts shall 
be sold at the cost of the paper and print- 
ing. They are now on sale at the United 
States Lake Survey Office, 33 Campau 
building. Detroit, at 25 cents each. 



NEW SHIPS ORDERED. 



The American Shipbuilding Company has 
booked orders for two more freight steamers 
for 1908 delivery. The ships, which will 
come out at the opening of navigation next 
spring, will cost about $600,000. 

W. II. Becker closed a contract for a 
freighter to be a duplicate of the steamer 
Francis L. Robbins. which 'was built in 
1905. She will be 400 feet over all. 380 feet 
keel. 50 feet beam and 28 feet deep. She 
will have triple expansion engines and 
Scotch boilers. This is the second steamer 
ordered by .Mr. Becker for 1908 delivery. 
The other boat will be 500 feet long and 
will be built at Bay City. 

The second order was placed by J. R. 
Davock. This steamer will be 440 feet over 
all, 420 feet keel, 52 feet beam and 28 feet 
deep. She will have a carrying capacity of 
about 7,500 tons. 

The new boat will have triple expansion 
engines, with cylinders 22, ^5 and 58 inches, 
with 42-inch stroke. The boilers will be of 
the Scotch type, 13 feet 9 inches in diameter 
and 1 1 feet 6 inches long. 

Nearly all the berths at the Lake yards 
for early delivery in 1908 have been taken. 



LAKE TRANSPORTATION. 



Demand the union label on all products ! 



The Bureau of the Census announces the 
results of its inquiry into the operations of 
\ essels on the Great Lakes. This covers the 
number of vessels in operation, their ton- 
nage, valuation, income, wages paid and 
character of construction of vessels. 

The following table gives the results of 
all classes of crafts of five tons and over, 
operated on the Great Lakes and the St. 
Lawrence River in 1906, compared with 
1889: 

1906. 1889. 

Number of vessels . . 2,965 2.737 

Gross tonnage 2.301.042 920,2' ' ! 

Commercial valid- 
ation $130,722,040 $48,580,174 

Gross income 65,278,487 35,463,852 

Average number of 
employes on ves- 
sels .' 24,872 22.7 '26 

Total wages paid. . .$ \.^.2'?7..WH S 8,098,191 
Number of passen- 
gers carried 13.761.014 2.2y?.>><hl 

Total horsepower of 

engines 981,452 

Character of construction — 

Iron vessels 33 45 

Steel vessels 538 40 

Wooden vessels ... 2,3o7 2,641 

Composite vessels. . 27 11 

During 1906 the total domestic shipments 
from ports on the Great Lakes and St. Law- 
rence River amounted to 75,610,690 tons, 
and this compared with 25.266,974 reported 
at the Census of 1889, shows an increase of 
50.343,716 tons. 



TWELVE YEARS' LOSSES. 



The aggregate of the losses to Lake ship- 
ping during the twelve seasons up to and 
including 1006, as compiled by the United 
States Weather Bureau, foots up $16,220,201, 
an average of $1,243,333 per season. Appor- 
tioned by years, the totals are : 

1895 $1,068,928 

1896 363,520 

1897 697,400 

1898 1,796.603 

1899 613,750 

1900 555,175 

1901 1,149,300 

1902 1,365,300 

1903 989,175 

1904 521,750 

1905 4,055,250 

1906 2,043,850 

Much of the greatest loss of all the Lakes, 
during these twelve years, was sustained on 
Superior in 1905, when vessel property was 
damaged or destroyed to the total amount of 
$2,485,650, the nearest approach to this be- 
ing the loss of $777,826 recorded on Lake 
Michigan in 1895. 



Assinorbia, the Canadian Pacific's steamer 
which arrived in Canada from Scotland re- 
cently, is being cut in two at Quebec. When 
the work is completed the vessel will go to 
Buffalo, where the two parts will be joined 
at the yards of the Buffalo drydock. The 
Assinorbjia is a large passenger steamer 
built for service on the L T pper Lakes in 
connection with the Canadian Pacific service. 



LAUNCHED AT DETROIT. 



Two modern steamers of different classe> 
were successfully launched at the Detroit 
shipyards recently. The bulk freighter Ed- 
win X. Ohl was dropped overboard at the 
Wyandotte yard of the American Ship- 
building Company. She was christened in 
honor of a well-known iron man of Pitts- 
burg by Mrs. J. W. Wescott. of Detroit. 

The Ohl is building for the Vesta Transit 
Company, of Cleveland, of which W. II. 
Becker is manager. The steamer is 440 
feet over all, 420 feet keel, 54 feet beam and 
28 feet deep. She will have triple expansion 
engines and Scotch boilers. The Ohl will 
be ready in about thirty days and Captain 
F. B. Chilson, now master of the steamer F. 
L. Robbins, will sail her. 

The steamer Rochester which was dropped 
into the water at the Ecorse yard of the 
Great Lakes Engineering Works is a pack- 
age freighter. She is building for the West- 
ern Transit Company, of Buffalo. She is a 
duplicate of the steamer Duluth and is 400 
feet over all. 380 feet keel, 50 feet beam and 
26 feet deep. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



The old Watson elevator, which stood at 
the junction of Buffalo Creek and the Black- 
well canal for nearly fifty years, was burned 
recently. A strong southeast wind threat- 
ened to spread the fire, and firemen devoted 
their efforts to saving shipping and adjoin- 
ing property. The harbor entrance was 
blocked and many vessels were delayed. The 
Anchor line offices, the Lackawanna coal 
trestle and the steamer Frank L. Vance 
were for a time in serious danger. The 
elevator was owned by the Watson estate 
and had been out of service six years. It 
was valued at $50,000. 



The new Duluth, Missabe & Northern 
coal dock is very nearly filled and the 
erection of the steel superstructure has be- 
gun at both ends. When this dock is fin- 
ished it will be one of the largest on the 
Lakes, and the only one of steel construc- 
tion at Duluth or Superior. At Two Har- 
bors the Duluth & Iron Range is trying 
the experiment of steel for an ore dock and 
it is thought that when No. 1 Missabe dock 
is rebuilt that it also will be of steel. The 
Missabe docks have adopted a new style of 
ore chute which will allow the ore to slide 
into the vessels without any chance of clog- 
ging, and when the docks are rebuilt an im- 
provement even on these new spouts will be 
installed. 



A number of charitable people in Bir- 
mingham about five years ago started a 
small hand-loom factory to provide a useful 
and remunerative employment for crippled 
girls. Many of the delicate fabrics are ar- 
tistically hand-woven in silk, serge and flax, 
and the results are most attractive. The 
product of the factory, which is also a school 
in hand-weaving, is acquiring a reputation 
for artistic merit and quality, and the enter- 
prise is now paying its way. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SKYSCRAPER OF THE FUTURE. 



The fact that two forty-five story sky- 
scrapers aie now pushing up from New 
York's narrow streets toward the clouds is 
causing the throng who stop at all hours of 
the day to watch the ironworkers dangling 
like spiders in the web of steel to ask con- 
tinually what the limit will be in skyscraper 
construction. Both a prominent skyscraper 
architect and the head of one of the largest 
building concerns in the city, who were seen 
on the subject, declared last week that the 
limit was still far distant. The 150-story 
skyscraper was possible to-day, they de- 
clared, so far as the builder and the archi- 
tect were concerned, and might come in the 
future. Such buildings would be a quarter 
of a mile in height. 

New York's building problem is one of 
the most remarkable in the world. The major 
part of the vast business interests of Man- 
hattan is compressed within an area of less 
than two square miles. Here are the head- 
quarters of practically all of the great rail- 
road systems of the United States ; here 
stands that mysterious building from which 
the Standard Oil Company reaches out to 
every quarter of the globe ; here the Steel 
Trust has its financial home, and hundreds of 
other holding companies and corporations ; 
here the great exchanges, banks, trust com- 
panies, brokerage offices and the great horde 
of lawyers. The business growth, shut in 
from the south, west and east by the waters 
of the bay and the Hudson and East rivers, 
can find an outlet only by pushing the the- 
ater and residence districts slowly to the 
north. For New York has ample length 
for expansion in one direction, but is lacking 
in width. For this lack the utmost engineer- 
ing ingenuity is constantly employed to sub- 
stitute height. 

Hence the building of the skyscrapers has 
become practically a science of itself. 

Two factors limit the size of buildings in 
New York. The first is the wind. If the 
wind never blew, the skyscraper builder's 
task would be greatly simplified, and he 
could pile story on story to his heart's con- 
tent. But the wind pressure on a thirty- 
story building is something enormous. The 
modern skyscraper is built to withstand a 
wind velocity of 125 miles, and there is prac- 
tically no chance of New York getting a 
mightier blow than that. 

The second factor is the limit of the build- 
ing's base. With land in the financial dis- 
trict selling as high as $700 a square foot the 
base of a building is naturally not a huge 
thing. If the skyscraper could have an un- 
limited base it could have an unlimited 
height. 

Before ever a spadeful of earth is dug for 
a foundation the skyscraper must be 
weighed. It is weighed with paper and pen- 
cil, and hundreds of sheets are covered with 
figures. The great girders and beams, stone, 
cement, desks, human beings and even nuts 
and rivets, are carefully figured in before the 
building is begun. 

One of the newest skyscrapers now in 
course of construction, at Cortlandt street 
and Broadway, which will, for a time at 
least, be the largest office building in the 
world, will, it is estimated, weigh when 
completed 86,000 tons, an amount equal to 
the combined weight of all the inhabitants 
of Philadelphia. This enormous weight will 
be placed on a plot of ground hardly 25,000 
square feet in area, or about equal to ten 



ordinary city dwelling houses. The steel 
skeleton of the building has eighty-nine legs, 
or columns, which will bear its whole 
weight, and the engineers have had a most 
delicate problem to see that the weight was 
evenly distributed on these legs, lest some 
of them should collapse. There are about 
900 sections of steel columns weighing from 
one to ten tons each, and several thousand 
girders and floor beams weighing from one 
to twenty tons each. The number of rivets 
used will run into the millions. — New York 
Tribune. 



James Gasco of Detroit, watchman on the 
steamer- George Stone, was washed over- 
board by the heavy seas on Lake Superior 
four miles off the Portage Canal on Septem- 
ber 21 and was drowned. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 

ville. 



William Smith is requested to write to 
his sister, Mrs. Lot. Beeks, at Mannsville, 
N. Y. Important! 



John Murphy would like to hear from 
his brother, Dan Murphy, now on rhe Pa- 
cific Coast. Address John Murphy, 1244 
Main street, Cleveland. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQU«iRTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, Ml. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND. 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT., CANADA Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA. ... (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, C 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis-. 
Saginaw, Mich 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, M'.ch. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



We Don't Patronize. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
theim & Schiffer, of New York City; Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Flour — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Valley City Milling Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

Whiskey — Finch Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 
Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — .1. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Henry H. Roe- 

lof & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y. ; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printing — Hudson, Kimberley & Co., printers, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond, Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, 111.; Corning Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement — Portland Peninsular Cement Company, Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Baily & Co., Am- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Brown & Sharpe Tool 
Company, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden, N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville, 111.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company), Rutland, Vt.; Erie City Iron 
Works, Erie, Pa.; Singer Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.; Pittsburg Expanded Metal Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa.; American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul. 
Minn.; Standard Sewing Machine Company, Cleve 
land, Ohio; Manitowoc Dry Dock Company, Manito 
woe, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. ; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont. ; Home Stove 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind.; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, Circle- 
ville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumber — Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash.; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolis, 
Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Raymondsville, N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper — William Bailey & Sons, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany, Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth— Thos. E. Gleeson, East Newark, N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Bill Posters— Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co., and New York Bill Posting Co., New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddington Hotel, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Railways— Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy— Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

Its Messenger Service. 
D. M Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
T'uomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SANE EASTERN VIEW. 



No national line of cleavage appears in 
the Pacific Northwest in the opposition to 
the "Orientalization" of labor. Last Wed 

nesday hundreds of Hindoos were expelled 
nun Bellingham, Wash., and last night 
the mob of Vancouver, P>. C, ran 
2,000 Chinese out of the city. Which com- 
munity corrupted the good morals of the 
other it is difficult to determine, since they 
are only fifty miles apart, and it is plain 
that the sentiment of protection of labor 
against Asiatic competition is common to 
both. At Vancouver the police had great 
difficulty in preventing the rioters from 
raiding the Japanese quarters. 

Forcible expulsion of the Mikado's sub- 
jects might have occasioned a little strain- 
ing of the Anglo-Japanese entente, though 
had it occurred it would have been but a 
militant application of a policy already in- 
augurated in some of the British colonies. 
Australia has by statute stopped the fur- 
ther incoming of the Japanese laborers, and 
there is strong pressure at Ottawa for simi- 
lar legislation. The Californians are not 
the only people who admire the Japanese 
only at a distance, a fact that the Tokio 
Government may well bear in mind when 
the Japanese jingoes grow troublesome in 
their demands for "energetic measures" 
against the United States. Colonists no- 
where welcome the great inrush of cheap 
labor, since a large part of a colonial popu- 
lation is usually dependent on manual la- 
bor. With this opposition combines that 
of union labor, which has succeeded in Aus- 
tralia in eliminating Lascars from the crews 
of vessels drawing Australian subsidy. 

In South Africa almost the first import- 
ant act of the new Transvaal Parliament 
was to pass a law intended to work the ul- 
timate exclusion of Asiatics, a category in 
which are reckoned Chinese, Japanese and 
Hindoos. The Hindoos have raised the 
point that, being British subjects, they are 
not lawfully to be excluded from any British 
possession, but the Poers and the English 
in the Transvaal are of one mind on the sub- 
ject. So long ago as 1885 the Boers enact- 
ed that no Hindoo could acquire "fixed 
property" in the South African Republic, 
after a specified day of that year, and the 
question of the disposition of certain estates 
of Hindoos deceased has precipitated an 
appeal to the Imperial Government. There 
are about 12,000 Hindoos resident in the 
Transvaal, who protest that if the colonial 
interpretation of their statute is correct they 
are denied the constitutional rights of Brit- 
ish subjects. 

All these incidents, occurring as they do 
in the United States and in British posses- 
sions, are revelations of a racial antipathy 
sharpened by labor antagonisms. The Oc- 
cident and the Orient are better friends 
apart than when they mix and mingle. 
While political exigencies may induce the 
formation of alliances between Western and 
Eastern nations, like that between Great 
Britain and Japan, their people do not easily 
abandon their prejudices or their policies. 
Such treaties may prove of benefit to both 
signatories without bringing about anything 
like a popular breadth of appreciation for 
"the brotherhood of man." The average" 
Englishman, like the average American, re- 
serves to himself the right to decide as to 
whether he shall regard the Japanese as his 
brother or his brother-in-law. 



PENSIONS IN GERMANY. 



Sixteen years ago the German law relat- 
ing to insurance against old age and infirm- 
ity came into operation. It has been slight- 
ly remodeled since, but the principle re- 
mains the same. It makes insurance against 
old age or infirmity legally compulsory for 
all workmen above the age of 16 years with 
a wage up to £100 a year. Assistants, 
journeymen, apprentices, servants, sailors, 
technical employes are all included in the 
term "working men," and to-day just 4,000,- 
000 persons in Germany have the pleasant 
feeling denied to British working men that 
they will not be destitute in their old age. 

The benefits to which these 14,000,000 
persons are entitled are as follows: 

If, in consequence of old age, sickness or 
infirmity, the income of the insured is per- 
manently reduced below one-third of its 
previous average, an allowance of £25 a 
year. 

If the insured completes his seventieth 
year without having previously become in- 
capable of earning his wage, an annual al- 
lowance up to £11 10s a year. 

Workmen, employers and the State con- 
tribute toward the fund from which the pen- 
sions are paid, the workman paying Erom 
\|d to 2<\ a week, the employers paying the 
same amount for each employe, and the 
State contributing £2 10s yearly to each 
pension when it falls due. The work of 
the insurance is carried out by thirty-one 
Imperial insurance offices, and there is now 
a fund on hand of over £80,000,000. 

Since the establishment of the system the 
workmen have contributed a total to the 
fund of just over £20,000,000, but already 
they have drawn in pensions the enormous 
amount of £50,000,000. 

It is not only in regard to Old-Age pen- 
sions, however, that the German workman 
is looked after by the State. He is also com- 
pelled by law to insure himself against 
sickness, a law which dates back as far as 
1883. In the first year of the existence of 
the law 4.500,000 people were insured under 
its provisions. To-day the number is 12,- 
000,000, and 20,000 offices arc needed to 
carry out the work. 

The benefits under the system provide 
for free medical treatment and medicines, 
half wages for six months, and twenty times 
the daily wage in case of death, as well as 
other benefits. The premiums are paid, 
two-thirds by the workingmen themselves 
and one-third by the employers. 

An idea of the enormous extent to which 
the benefits under this scheme of legalized 
insurance have been enjoyed may be gained 
from the fact that since it began 60,500,000 
cases of sickness have been relieved, repre- 
senting in all over 1,000,000,000 days of 
sickness, and a total sum of money amount- 
ing in the aggregate to £125,000,000. 

Germany's law embodying the principle of 
the British Workmen's Compensation Act 
is another matter in which the State has 
taken a firm line, much to the benefit of the 
workingmen. Every employer has, since 
1885, been compelled to insure all his em- 
ployes who earn less than £150 a year 
against accident. The result of this com- 
pulsion has been the formation of insurance 
unions by employers in each particular 
branch of trade, called "Berufsgenossen- 
schaften," and these unions, of which there 
are sixty-six in all, now insure the safety of 
over 18,500,000 working people. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO. Cat. 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. Wash.. 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. Or.. 51 T'nlon Ave. 
EUREKA, Cat, P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEI'RO, Cat, P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLri.TT. IT. T., 821 Alakea St.. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cat. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT7 O, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cat, 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock. Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO, Cat, P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash.. P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAX FRAXTTSCO. Cat. 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA. Or.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
T.A fONXFR. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
OEOROETOWX. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
BORIXG. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cat, 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cat, 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney. N. S. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

A. G. Oberg, No. 744. a retired member of the 
Sailors' Union "f the Pacific, is inquired for by 
C. E. Roberts, 44-46 East street, San Francisco. 

Edward Bodey. born in Brixton, near London, 
England, aered about 54, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

P.ror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derbults. Forsamlin, Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martcll, a native of Finland, aged about 
47, last beard of on the Pacific Coast about 15 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. \d 
dress. Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg. Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago. is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing his present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Ferndale, Wash. 

Tvar Walter Lindblom, native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address, 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco. 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis, Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years. 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



THE BELLINGHAM OUTBREAK. 



Bellingham, Wash., drove out the Hin- 
doos last week. Bellingham is less than 
fifty miles southeast of Vancouver, and, of 
course, of easy entrance for Hindoos that 
land in Canada. A dispatch a day or two 
ago spoke of a shipload of more than two 
thousand Sikhs and other natives of India 
that were on the ocean bound for Van- 
couver. Of course they are induced to come 
across the line to this country by mill own- 
ers, because places have been offered them 
again in mills and protection guaranteed. It 
is said that the "blacks," as the dispatches 
call them, have been growing bold and in- 
solent, insulting" women in the streets and 
that sort of thing. Perhaps ! But the case 
is enough just as it stands. These people 
have been displacing native white labor in 
the mills. That tells the story. At bottom, 
mixed with much else that is not true, and a 
great deal more that is unlovely, it is the 
same thing that has caused and character- 
ized the turbulence of years in San Fran- 
cisco. It is an irrepressible conflict. It faces 
Canada and Australia as it does this coun- 
try. Unless we are prepared to give up 
something of our civilization and grade our- 
selves down to the standards of Orientals 
this incoming tide will have to be stopped. 
We are not alone in having the problem to 
face and this is fortunate. Canada is as 
vitally interested as we are, and is quite 
as much aroused. Australia is even more 
aroused. 

The situation simply is that the East and 
the West have met. For years we have 
been battering down Eastern exclusiveness 
with cannon and other things. Now it is 
down and the people of the East, waking 
from their long sleep, are pouring out over 
the earth. We find all at once that we do 
not want them with us ; that their standards 
of life and ideas will not agree with ours. 
And when we are presented with the con- 
crete instances of Hindoos, that work in our 
mills for wages that Americans can not take, 
we are confronted with a fact, not a theory, 
and we had just as well first as last face' it. 
The East and the West can not mingle. 
They can meet and trade, but they can not 
coalesce. On the other hand, we have as lit- 
tle right of domination in the East. If we 
expect that the Orientals shall stay at home, 
there comes the nice question as to what we 
are doing in their home in any other capac- 
ity than that of merchant offering our wares 
for theirs. Bengal is a vast factory of mil- 
lions of cheap and effective mill hands. The 
Bengalese toil their lives away for England. 
But they can not come to this country or 
to a British colony and toil on their own 
account. There the great question is "up to 
us," as the term of the day has it. We can 
not shut our eyes to it if we would. We 
have a European civilization and it is to be 
preserved against an Oriental civilization. It 
is a question that goes deeper than any 
mere sentiment or friendship or admiration 
or the kindliest consideration. It is a ques- 
tion of life. When two such civilizations 
meet Jn competition the lower inevitably 
prevails. That is not what the white 
man settled the Western world for, and the 
demonstration of the fact is at hand. We 
find in the New York Mail the following, 
which comes pat for application on the Bel- 
lingham incident : 

"There is to be no synthesis between East 
and West. The human race is not ready for 



that yet, if it ever will be. Much of the 
world's recent political history has pro- 
ceeded on the theory that such a synthesis 
was near at hand. One composite civiliza- 
tion near to be produced by the blending of 
Orient and Occident. While it was not as- 
sumed that there was to be also one com- 
posite race, it was not definitely and clearly 
denied. That problem was remanded to the 
future or blinked altogether. Meanwhile the 
Western world went on with feverish haste 
in its task of bringing itself in physical con- 
tact with the East. It penetrated India and 
imposed the 'pax Brittanics' on its warring 
races. It woke up Japan very thoroughly. 
It sought to wake up China. It cut the Suez 
Canal, built the trans-Siberian railroad and 
established steamer routes by which, sailing 
either east or west, the Orient was brought 
to its doors. The East and the West are 
now face to face and each is discovering that 
it is not yet ready to throw itself into the 
other's arms. Each has its own life to live, 
and is still minded to live it in its own way. 
Their claims and counter-claims may be dis- 
posed of by saying that they just about off- 
set each other." — Indianapolis News. 



RECALL IN DES MOINES. 



The most important and perhaps the most 
startling innovation is the safeguard known 
as the Recall, designated for the purpose of 
placing all officials within the absolute con- 
trol of the people. Although officials com- 
posing the governing board are elected for 
a definite term of two years, yet, under this 
provision of the "Ues Moines plan," their 
continuation in office is at all times subject 
to the will of a majority of the electors. 
The history of practically every city is dis- 
graced with names of officers who have 
proven unmindful of the trust imposed in 
them, and who could not be removed be- 
fore the expiration cf their term of office. 
Under this provision of the new charter, 
such a situation could be met by a prompt 
recall of the offending member. A peti- 
tion signed by 25 per cent of the voters, and 
stating in general terms charges of incom- 
petency or dishonesty, would "be filed with 
the city clerk. The offending or guilty 
official would then, without further delay, 
be required to stand for re-election with 
any other candidate whom the people choose 
to nominate, and the one receiving the high- 
est number of votes will be the officer for 
the remainder of the term. This recall 
feature of the law will undoubtedly have a 
tendency to keep public officials in the 
straight and narrow path of their duty, ever 
faithful to the trust of their constituents. 
The highest form of democratic government 
is not attained by electing a multiplicity of 
city officials, each official to act as a check 
upon the other, but popular liberty is more 
certain of attainment where fewer officials 
are elected and the proper facilities are 
made for impressing upon these officials the 
popular will, and make them responsible to 
the whole people for the execution of that 
will. 

The desirability of having the member- 
ship of the governing board made up of the 
strongest men of the city has not been over- 
looked by the framers of the "Des Moines 
plan." Not only have they made the office 
one of honor and opportunity, attractive to 
the honest and capable of every community, 
but they have so changed the manner of 
choice that the election of this type of men 



is less difficult, and the election of politi- 
cians without business ability less possible. 
The primary, as well as the election, has 
been made non-partisan, so that candidates 
can no longer depend for their election upon 
party affiliations, but must go before the 
people upon their own merits. Ward lines 
have been removed, and with the people 
voting at large the evils of ward politics are 
abolished, electors are freer in recording 
their choice of candidates, and the business 
man is better able to secure his election 
without stooping to the low practices of the 
politician. 

The new charter certainly has an invit- 
ing appearance, especially from the view- 
point of theory, yet it remains for the citi- 
zens of Des Moines to demonstrate that 
its provisions are as practical in operation 
as they are beautmtl in theory. Des Moines, 
a city of 100,000 people, offers a good field 
in which to try the plan ; she is entering up- 
on a most interesting and instructive ex- 
periment in government reform, and the 
eyes of the American municipalities are up- 
on her, hoping that the "Des Moines plan" 
will prove a practical system, under which 
the public affairs of our cities can be wise- 
ly and economically administered. — Sidney 
T. Wilson, in National Magazine. 



"END OF VOYAGE." 



By the provisions of the Merchant Ship- 
ping Act, 1894, the agreement made by the 
crew to serve on a ship must contain either 
the nature, or as far as practicable the du- 
ration of the intended voyage or engage- 
ment, or the maximum period of the 
voyage or engagement, and the places 
or parts of the world, if any, to 
which the voyage or engagement is not 
to extend. Agreements may be made for a 
voyage, or if the voyages of the ship aver- 
age less than six months in duration, may 
be made to extend over two or more voy- 
ages. 

A fireman signed articles of agreement to 
serve "on a voyage not exceeding one year's 
duration to any ports or places within the 
limits of 75 degrees north latitude and 60 
degrees south latitude, commencing at Car- 
diff, proceeding thence to Malta, thereafter 
trading to ports in any rotation, and to end 
at such port in the United Kingdom or Con- 
tinent of Europe (within home-trading 
limits) as may be required by the master." 

The ship sailed to Malta, thence to the 
I Slack Sea, where she loaded a cargo of 
grain to be wholly discharged at South- 
ampton, and then sailed to Southampton. 
At the place last named the cargo was com- 
pletely discharged, and the fireman claimed 
his wages and discharge on the ground that 
the voyage and the engagement were at an 
end. The master, however, required him 
to go on to Cardiff, and refused to pay his 
wages or give him a discharge at Southamp- 
ton. The fireman then summoned the mas- 
ter for his wages and compensation, and 
the magistrates referred the matter to the 
High Court. The Nigh Court decided in 
favor of the fireman, but on appeal the 
Court of Appeal overruled that decision, 
and held that the master was entitled to re- 
quire the man to go on to Cardiff. There 
was a further appeal to the House of Lords, 
and that tribunal affirmed the decision of 
the Court of Appeal. — The Scarsdale, House 
of Lords, July 29, 1907. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



EUREKA. CAL. 



Victoria, Australia, has 4766 fac- 
tories, employing 67,545 persons. 

Two thousand unemployed have 
petitioned the Transv:i:d Government 
to send them back to England. 

Adelaide (Australia) flour-mill em- 
ployes have formed a strong union, 
and requested Premier Price to 
tablish a wages board for the trade. 

In Germany there are 33 Gov< in 
ment labor colonies, and one in the 
United Kingdom, for the reception 
and employment of workless toilers. 

In the Australian cities of Sydney, 
Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth, there 
is a marked activity in union circles. 
New unions are rapidly springing up, 
and the ranks of the older ones are in- 
creasing in number. 

The negotiations between the jew 
clry manufacturers and the skilled 
workmen at Paris, France, have failed. 
It is announced that 110 employers 
have decided to dismiss their em- 
ployes and will declare a lockout. 

University extension lectures are 
now delivered at meetings of the 
Trades and Labor Council of Sydney, 
Australia, by professors of the uni- 
versity, who at the same time receive 
instruction as to objects of the Labor 
movement. 

A general strike to compel the 
enactment of Universal Suffrage laws 
began in Hungary on October 10. 
164 towns no work is going on and 
no food can be bought anywhere, 
every hotel, coffee house and restaur- 
ant being closed by the police. 

A correspondent of a Charters 
Towers (Queensland) newspaper 
states that in the Ingham district su- 
gar farmers employ aboriginals at 
from Is to Ids per week, and in one 
mill in the district Japs and other 
colored aliens arc working at almost 
every trade, from fitters and carpen- 
ters to blacksmiths. 

The passive resistance strike at Vi- 
enna, Austria, is extending to the 
freight traffic on some of the divisions 
in Moravia. The municipal authori- 
ties are concerned regarding the pro- 
visioning of the city, as shipments of 
meat, fruit and vegetables have al- 
ready fallen off. Thousands of work- 
ers are now earning only 40 cents a 
day. 

Keir llardie*s bill to provide work 
for the unemployed, recently intro- 
duced in the House of Commons by 
Ramsay Macdonald, proposes that 
local authorities must devise schemes 
for providing work, the necessary 
funds to come out of local rates, and. 
where extreme distress arises. Parlia- 
ment to vote money to meet the diffi 
culty. 

In consequence of 1500 British scabs 
being imported by the Antwerp Ship- 
owners' Association to take the place 
of the local wharf laborers striking 
for better conditions. Labor Member 
Crooks has introduced a bill in the 
British Mouse of Commons to apply 
the penalities of the Foreign Enlist- 
ment Act to British workmen who 
take the places of workmen on strike 
abroad. 

In the Victorian Assembly recently 
a motion of adjournment was moved, 
in order to bring before Parliament 
the brutal treatment meted out to coal 
miners at Outrim and Jumbunna. 
M. L. A. Lemmon, who moved the 
motion, urged that the public should 
boycott every ounce of coal supplied 
by the companies at these places, in 
consequence of the unfair treatment of 
the men. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Successor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots, Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe-$2.00 to $5.00-Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 

Office are advertised for three months 

only, and will be returned to the Post 

it the expiration uf that period if 

not called or sent for. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered and shipped 
to any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 





SMOKE 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the 


'Lit- 


tie 


Beauty,' the "Princess" 


and 


other high grade union-made c 


gars. 




Manufactured by 






C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street, Eureka 


Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <£. YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 
FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

onable Elates. 
Front Street, between C and D. 
EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA. CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

L'nion Label Goods. 

A. ROSENSTEIN. Prop. 

23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore. 

Phone Clay 685. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Arras, Morltz 
Andersen, -1550 
Anderson, A. 
Andersen, Frltjof 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bergh, Edw. 
Bawens, Edemon 
Boose, Paul 
Bluhm, Peter 
Dalton, Thos. H. 
Elving, Gust 
Ehlers, Henry 
Eriksen, E. 



Lyche, H. M. 
Lettve. Honore 
Lang, G. 
Llndstrom, Emil 
Lindeman. A. 
Le Fever, Louis 
Maack, Hans 
Nordstrom. Knut 

Olaf 
Nurmi, E. W. -865 
Nurmlnen, J. V. 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen. Albert 



Enzbretsen. Dan. B. Ordlg, Bruno 



Gordlad, Arthur 
Gustafson, E. A. 
Goethe, Victor B. 
Griel, B. 
Hartman, Karl 
Helms, Wm. 
Hansen John 
Hansen, Harrald 
Irers, John 
Jaensen, Hans 
Jacobsson, John 
Johannessen 

H. 
Jansen, -1728 
Janson, Oscar 
Tohanson, A. J. 



Petersen, Ed. 
Pettersson, G. E. 
Petterson, Harald 
Petterson, Mauritz 
Raetz, Aug. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Russell, Ed. 
Svendsen, Thorval 
Selander, Gust 
Swanson, Ivar 
Hans Smith, Max 
Staaf, Louis 
Thomson, John 
Tyrholm, Johan 
Udd, John 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WHSBK. 

Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



FRANK STHEVENS 
sals exclusively in unlon-m 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 
Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, Jufil 
around the corner from the Union I 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

( Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods. Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



Krlstoffersen, Emil Vincent, Joseph 
Kaderhecht, Alf. Walter, M. 
Kaufold. E. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Behrman, a native of Olden- 
burg, Germany, born 1858, is inquired 
for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St.. next to Commercial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton fiannel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Adams, Joseph 

lohan 
Akesson. H. 
Allendsen, H. 
Albers, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 

lU, A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
son, n. M. 

Anderson, Axel 

Anderson, Victor 

Anderson, L. T. -735 

Anderson, Hjalmar 

Anderson, Oscar 

Anderson, J. -760 

Anderson, J. E. 

Andersen, -1520 

Apps. 1'. 

Appelquist, O. T. 
en, Martin 
i Aspen, K. D. 

Austin. M. M. 

Bateman, S. J. 

Berg, Albert 

Bernard. S. 

Belin, Erik 

Bensen, P. 

Bernert. F. 

Iieh rend. F. C. 
! Bensen. J. E. 

Rerg. H. M. 

Bee. Colin 

Berkelund. R. 

Blndsell. W. 

Blllington. J. M. 

Bjomholm, 11. 
'. A. 

Rlomberg, G. 

Rnteereist. L. 
P. 

Bratrud. O. M. 

Rraa. P. O. 

Brunstrom. G. 

''rnnelew. W. 

Brewer, W. 

Brown, F. 

Brynlngf, W. 

Brown, James 

Burk, C. 

Bucktman, F. 

Bundersen. Jens 
on, Jacob 

•"■arisen, Hans 

Gapello, H. 

Carlson, A. 

Carlson. R -fir.6 

Carlson. J. -861 

Chotard, Emil 

Oewley, James 

Clark. S. D. 

Clauson, c. L. 

Cortes. P. 

H. 
Cort, V. 
Craig, C A. 

f'liristensen. O. 
Danlelsen. David 

Is, C. 
Danlelsen. Ernest 
riennett. J. 
neboth. Paul 
Doran, Eugene 
Dorest, A. C. 
I 'oilman. F. 
! oin. are. Y. 
Dudler, H. 
Edson, F. 
Edvardsen, J. 
Kkeland. S. 
Ellingsen. II. 
Eltman. H. 
Englund, R. 
Englund, L. F. 
Engberg. (). 
Erikson, Olav 
en, Allen 
Eriksen, Viktor 
Eriksen, Konrad 
Eriksen, Aug 
Eskola, it. 
Evans. S. 

Is, J. 
Fernandez, D 
Fitzgerald, H. 
Fisher. T. 
Flvnn. P. 
Karlson. G. -622 
Frivold. J. J. 
Fredrlksen, W. 
Frlcke. C. 
FYankenberg, V. 
Garbers, H. 
Oad, V. 
Gamher, Jas. 
Gerner. Hans 
Qenstrom. F. 
Ooerke E 
Ondt. W. 
''■rower. Alton 

Grunbolk, J. 
Green. J. 
Gunnnsnn. J. 
Gundersen. G. 
Ounther. RIchari 
Gundersen, And. 
Gustafsen, Karl 
Gutman, H. 
Hansen. Fred 
Hansen. H. -1723 
TTav. W. -1179 
Harker. Fd. 
Haker. Max 
Hartnett. W. 
Hansen. Maurice 
Ha gen. C. L. 
Hansen. H. C. F. 
Hansen. N. 
Hage. A. 
Halherg. O. 
Hardy. W. 
Hansen, Albert 
Hansen. W. 
Hanger. B. 
Mansen. J. E. 
Hakonsen. John 
Helms. W. 
TToidenherg. G. 
fermansen, F. 
TTenrlks. G. 



Helenius, K. 
Henning, L. 
Hikellet, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg. W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holtl. J. W. 
Honde, I'. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustide. H. 
Hultberg, E. J. 
Ingebretsen. .John 
Ingebretsen, Karl 
Ingalls, W. L. 
Iversen, s. B. 
Isaksen. I 
Ivarsen. I. 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen. J. A. 
Jacobs. W. M. 
Jacobsen, Johan 
Jacobsen, H. M, 
Jacobsen. John 
Jack. P. 

Jacobsson. Johan 
Jensen, P. -1431 
Jensen. E. -1298 
Jensen. J. G. -1668 
Jensen. P. -748 
Jensen. J. G. -6S6 
Johansen, T. B. 
Johansen. A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen. Geo. W. 
Johnsen. Aug. -1451 
Johnsen. Fr. 
Johnson. C. J. -1566 
Johnson. N. G. 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson. 11. L. 
Johnson. Tim 
Johnsson. John A. 
.lohnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 
.Tonsaon. A. J. 
Jones. Fred 
Jorgensen. A if 
Jorgensen, Th 
Jorgensen. J. A. 
Jurgenson. John 
Jordt, P .-1737 
Jurgenson. Ernest 
Kahlbetzer, f. 

Karlson. J. A. -388 
Kanford, Ed. 
Karlstrom, I 
Karsimer. N. J 
Kormagoret. A. 
Kelly, !• 
KIttelsen, K. 
Kinloch. W. 
Klemettllla. H. 
Kloes. W. O. F. 

Klein ensen 

KnofT. IT. 

Kristensen. E. -901 
Km use. E. 
Kreutz, C. 
Kristensen. K. D. 
Krager. H. 
Kristensen, G. 
Kroemke, N. 

net. A. T. 

Krlstoffersen, Emil 
Ktimmerlnwe. O. 
Lalx, N. E. 
Lnlne, w. e -in* 

n, H. -0ri7 
T.arsen, K. H 
T.arsen, IT. -1105 
Larsei 

T.arsen. Eingal 
T.emerle, C. 

I epp, P. 

Le Fevre. L. 

n. J. 
LIdgett. J. A. 
Lind, ir. B. 

i H. Vanden 
l.inrleman, H. 

r. L. 

T.orho, M. 
T.unde. O. . 
T.undgren. R. 
Lubeok, R. A. 
T vsell. Gen. 
Mattson, F. 
Martinson. K 
Madsen, G F. 
Mathlsen MF 
Marthinsen. Kr. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Manas, W. F 
MeKenzIe, A. 
J. 
i and. O. 
Mietenan. J. 
Mid jo. A. 
Miller. C. W. 
ATikkelsen. Kr. 
Monchy. IT. 
Merken, J. L. 
Muller. P. 
Muller. H. 
Munhy. J. W. 
Nass. Axel 
Nesbltt, James 
Nielsen, N. -751 
Nilsen, Edwin 
Nllsen, B. s. -731 
Nielsen. Anders 
Nilsen. Olans 
Nllsen. C. L. 
Nielsen. N. K. V. 
Nllsen. K. C. -072 
Nllsen. C. V. 
Nllson. C. J. -885 
Norris. J. E. 
Nolan, James 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Nystrora, Ragner 
Oextlger, O, 

Olsen. T.ndvlg 

Olsen, Harry 

Olsen. Oscar 

Olsen, Christ 

Olsen. Raynvald 
Olssen. Johan 

Olsen, K. E. 

Olsen. II. M. 

Olsen, Just. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 

321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & 

G STREETS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



GRIGGS' HARDWARE STORE 

SHIP CHANDLER 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street 

ABERDEEN, - - - WASH 



W. C. JUDSON 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



THE HUB 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING STORE 
L. FOGEL, Prop. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubebr Boots 
to a Talior-made Suit. 

405 HERON STREET. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Otto, L. Sten, Ivar 

Overland, T. Stervik, Louis 

Parkhurst, Thos. Sterr, W. T. 

Paulson, Hans Stuhr, H. M. 

Petersen, CU. -990 strandquist, Louis 

Pettersen, Axel Steine I L 

Pedersen, L. Stickles, ' L.' A. 

Petersen, Peter stein> A _ _ 1883 

Pederson, K. -980 Stewart F 

Pederson, John Sveerd, S. H. 

Pendville, N. Swanson, Hugo 

Peterson, Mauritz svensson, G. A. -1295 

Penosch, P. Taylor, A. 

Plummer, Karl Tereutt M 

Prescott, F. F. Thomse'n, P. -1432 

Pohler, Joseph Thomas, Wm. 

Polge, Louis Thun, E. H. 

Rahm, Carl Thomassen, K. 

Rasmussen, C. -551 xitus Ed 

Rasmussen, R. -525 Tipp,' Joseph 

Reuter, Ernest Tolaas K 

Remmel, T. Tornquist,' M. 

Reimann, Carl Torqusen, K. 

Rikkartsen, H. -597 Ton nesen, John 
Richard, Andreas „ 

Rosen, Frank L. ? T U r , ne r , D ' B ' 

Rosen, E. H. T u T dd ' . Jo £, n . 

Rose, W. H. Unruh, Paul 

Ryberg, S. Vou St. 0, 



Quetski, Herman 



Vierich, R. G. 



Savage, R. 



Wallrath, K. 

SampsonTc. -2137 W a ssemus, S. 

Sarin K Watts, E. K. 
Samu'elsen, H. -130lWahlstedt, R. -778 

Schwartsloze, F. W a mp, S' £• 

Scherlan, R. Webe r O. C. 

Scott, E. G. Westad, Johan 

Schro'eder, Aug. Westerholm. A. W. 

Schieman, E. -1744 Wikhlad, Otto 

Schaffer, P. Wennick, And. 

Schoffler, A. Westin, C. O. 

Sebelin, C. Wenniche. Haldor 

Selander, J. Westbroch, Joe 

Shane, J. Wilhelm, H. 

Simmonds, A. E. Wiking, Aug. 

Sikemeyer, W. Willert, L. 

Sjoquist, G. Woadhull, C. 

Smith, Ed. Wurzbach, W. 

Smith, J. S. Wulff, M. 

Sorensen, H. -1106 York, J. 

Sohst, A. Zacko, K. 

Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, Chas -907Lundgren, C. -1295 
Anderson, Axel Magnussen, Judgen 

Anderson, J, -1514 Mattson, Emil 
Arnold, Ernest Melgail, M. 

Battels, Herman McKenzie, Duncan 
Banthin, Julius Mulley, James 

Braun, William Nielsen, Jens 

Hrun, Mathlas -1492Clsen, Martin 
Eklund, S. W. -579 Olsen, Sigvald O. 
Fridlund, John Rasmussen, Akton 

Follis, Geo. Reay, S. A. 

Haak, Rheinhold Rehbein, Ernest 
Jensen, Albert -1650Rolesham, Jens W. 
Johansen, H. -2126 Rojahn, Aksel 
Kalberg, William Rollo, R. 
Rristensen, J, -1209 Rosenvold, Isak 
Laborde, Joseph Schade, Wenzel 

Lang, Gust. Smidt. Alfred 

Lonneker, Aug. Tidamann, Charllo 

Lowe, John A. Zink, Chas. 

Lubke, John Von 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m. except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonaple prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia ots., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., o~ Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



R. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire-Latimer Block. Seattle, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713 

Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 
CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Encbom, Carl R. 
Eliassen," C. E. 
Evans, Stanley 
Grew, Jorgen 
Heine, C. 
Helms, William 
Ilartman, Karl 
Knopff, Fritz 



Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, L. K. 
McLennan, Donald 
Olsen, Alfred 
Stachenssen, C 
Syvertsen, Syvaret 
Sande, Anton 
Tugland, Karl 



WORKERS UNION 



UWOHrfU STAMP 

Factory NO 



Understand 



BROTHER 
UNIONISTS 



That the best made shoes— the shoes made under the best manu- 
facturing conditions— the shoes that best stand wear— bear the Union 
Stamp, as shown herewith. 

Ask your dealer for Union Stamp shoes, and if he cannot supply 
you, write 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION, 

246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 



«tf""^ ■— — ^-~^ -m ^"n — *U — "> r> See tbat this lal)cl ( in "K^ 4 blue) 
^tw l^k/l 6 J Ir^. I * l^t ,a^^% *PP ear8 on t ' le box from which 



you are served. 




Issued by Authority of the Cigar MaKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

yJtliS (JfllrftP?. lhat the Cigars contained Inthls box have been made by a flCt'CIjSS Wrjrkllljtl 
ahUMBtROI THE CIGAR UAKEKI *mr LRNAII0NAL UNIONol Ame.-ica, an organiiatioa devoted hi the ad- 
vancement of the MCJRAl MAURIAlind IHKIUCIUM WtUARt Of TXC CRAIT. Therefore «o rowmnwxJ 
these Cigars to all smokers throughout the world 

All Infringements upon this Ubel vnlf be punished according to law 



$ W (/bduua. resident, 

V CtffUef 




Labor News. 



The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
Railroad has announced an increase 
in the wages of all telegraph operat- 
ors on the system. The increase went 
into effect October 1. 

Twelve thousand longshoremen, 
teamsters, freight handlers, etc., went 
on strike at New Orleans, La., on 
October 4, in sympathy with the sea- 
men, who have a disagreement with 
their employers. 

The Pittsburg Pressed Steel Car 
Company, one of the greatest manu- 
facturing concerns in the Pittsburg 
district, recently laid off 5000 of its 12,- 
000 employes, owing to the unsettled 
conditions of the railroads. 

Twenty West Springfield (Mass.) 
boarding house mistresses have 
formed a union and decided to raise 
the price of board from $5 to $6 a 
week. The rise in the price of food is 
given as the cause for the increased 
prices. 

The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railway Company has announced an 
increase to its 5000 boiler-makers and 
machinists over the entire system of 2 
cents an hour, and an increase to 
helpers of \ x / 2 cents an hour, effective 
October 1. 

The school teachers of Syracuse, O., 
are out on strike. The law requires 
that teachers shall be paid not less 
than $40 a month, but the Board of 
Education of Syracuse finds itself un- 
able to pay more than $25. The teach- 
ers demand the legal scale. 

In the Police Court at New Haven, 
Conn., on September 26, Frank J. 
McGee, of Worcester, Mass., was 
lined $400 and sentenced to two years 
in the County Jail on a charge of in- 
timidating strike-breakers at Mc- 
Lagon & Co.'s foundry in that city. 

A conservative estimate places the 
number of shoe-factory workers out 
at St. Louis, Mo., at 25,000. Letters 
have been sent to the management of 
the eighteen manufactories announc- 
ing the demands of the strikers. The 
companies have decided not to accede 
to any demands made by the strikers. 

The annual convention of the Na- 
tional Association of Railway Com- 
missioners has recommended Congres- 
sional legislation to compel railroads, 
both steam and electric, to protect 
their tracks by an automatic signal 
system, and urged the several State 
Legislatures to enact laws along this 
line. 

The merchant tailors of Los An- 
geles, Cal., who declared for the 
Open Shop six months ago, recently 
took more drastic action and voted to 
lock out all union journeymen. This 
is the culmination of the light long 
waged between the employers and the 
unions, and the direct result of a 
strike and boycott a year ago. 

The San Pedro, Los Angeles and 
Salt Lake Railroad Company has an- 
nounced a voluntary increase in pay 
of all telegraph operators and station 
agents on its road. The increase 
ranges from $5 to $25 a month, ac- 
cording to the importance of the posi- 
tions. The increase will mean a total 
advance in salary of from $1200 to 
$1500 monthly. 

The Canadian Deputy Minister of 
Labor has told the management of 
Spring Hill (Nova Scotia) mines 
where there is a strike, that unless 
they can supply coal for the Interna 
lioiial Railway, the Dominion Govern 
nient will be compelled to place an 
order for 60,000 tons with the United 
States firms, as this is needed for the 
Intercolonial, a Government owned 
railway. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



The Russian Council of Ministers 
■ m October 11 appropriated $9,500,000 
for colonization purposes in Siberia. 

The report of the death on October 
4 of the real mother of the Emperor 
of Japan, Lady Xakavama, was con 
firmed on the Sth. 

The authorities at St. Petersburg 
have ordered the confiscation of Coun. 
Tolstoi's book entitled "A Compara- 
tive Study of the Gospels." 

A special dispatch from Peking says 
the Dowager Empress has issued a de- 
cree declaring the Government of 
China to be a constitutional monarchy. 

Thirty six political prisoners broke 
out of the local prison at Kutais, Rus- 
sia, on October 10 and got away. They 
had been incarcerated in secret cells 
f( ir a year. 

The L'rsuline nuns. who. for many 
years, have resided in the convent at 
Graveleins, France, were expelled on 
September 28 by a large force of 
gendarmes. 

Sir John Charles Bell, ex-Sheriff of 
the City of London, ling., and head of 
a big brewery company, was elected 
Lord Mayor of London on September 
28. 

Mrs. Tingley's request for permis- 
sion to build a Theosophical institute 
on the picturesque island of VisingSOe, 
in Lake Yettern, has been refused by 
the Swedish Government. 

Several hundred young German 
women left Hamburg on October 3 
for German Southwest Africa, where 
they will take positions with the fami- 
lies of the German settlers and Gov- 
ernment officials. 

Secretary of War Taft, in an ad- 
dress at Tokio, Japan, on October 1. 
declared that war between the United 
States and Japan would be "a crime 
against modern civilization and as 
wicked as it would be insane." 

Mail advices from llayti state that 
sixteen men have been sentenced to 
death there for conspiring to over- 
throw ih,. Government of the repub- 
lic. The country is reported quiet, but 
many persons fear a revolution 

An autopsy at Belgrade, Servia, 
shows that the two Servian political 
prisoners who wero killed on Septcm 
ber 29 were the victims of police 
ferocity and the warden of the prison 
will be prosecuted for the murrler. 

An increase of 2461 is shown on the 
1906 figures in the return, just issued, 
of the number of persons receiving 
poor relief in London, Eng. Out of a 
population of 4,500.000 in 1906, 115.289 
were paupers, excluding 1192 casuals. 

Seven indictments have been found 
by the special Judge in the Cu- 
ban conspiracy eases. The indict- 
ments charge the conspirators with 
having agreed upon a plan to 
throw the Provisional Government of 
the United States. 

The police at Kieff, Russia, have ar- 
rested a revolutionist named Krugli- 
koff, alias Spransky, who is accused of 

having been an important accomplice 
o| Boris Nikitenko, a retired naval 
lieutenant, in the plot against the life 
of EmperOT Nicholas, for which Xiki- 
ten' o was executed on September 3. 
Tlie English insurance companies 
that set up non indorsement of co-in- 
surance as a special defense against 
paying losses sustained through the 
tire following the earthquake at King- 
ston, Jamaica, agreed to recede from 
their position if a resolution of con- 
den nation adopted by the Chamber 
of Commerce were rescinded. This 
was done, and those insured thus 
gained a victory. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 



Vis. Oskar 
A.i 1 lolien. It. 

Abel, Paul 
Abrahamsen, John 

A. kelson, I'. 

Ahlborg, R. W. 
Albrecht, Emll 
Albright, Emil 
Alksne, August 
Allen, Fred 
Amundson, F. A. 
vndersen. Frank 

Andersen. I IsCS r 
Andersen, ■•. ivlartin 
Andersen. -1156 
Anderson, Knut 
Anderson. Kans K. 
Anderson, Albin 
Anderson, -1449 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, -1149 
Anderson, -1218 
Bausback, -1511 
Baxter, VV. J. 
Bech, Niele 
Beling, i is, ar 
Bennett, Harry ll. 
Bensen, Sigurd 
Benson, John HJ. 
Berentsen, Oscar 
Berentsen, a. m. 
Berg, A. C. 
-645 
Berggren, V. 
Berglund, Nils P. 
Bergquist, Stanley 
Bergstrom, Frank 
Bernard, Arthur 
Bjordal, Gunder 
Bjorkhoim. G. A. 
Bjorseth, Knut 
Black, John 
Caldwell, Wm. M. G. 
Campbell, F. A. 
Canning, Jons 

Cam .Martin 

Carlsen, Th. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, -863 
Carlson, Hans 
Carlson, Conrad 
Carlsson, -1132 
Cavalin, G. 
('•lander, W. 
Chambers, A. G. 
i 'In istiansen, M. F. 
Christiansen, Fred 
Christiansen, Carl 
1 algaard, -1042 
i am. Otto 

annevlg, M. 
I '.avis, Fred 
I >avis, J J 
Day, ir. E3. 

e Baere, Henry 
iy, Thomas 

empster, J. 
Easton, it. \V. 
Edler, Carl 
Edolf, C. 
Ekman, Carl 
Bkstrand, Prank 
Ekvoll, Gus A. 
Elliott, John 
Ellsen, Fred 
Elueff, Robt. H. 

Kabriclus, H. 

Fagerberg. Allan 
Fa men. W. L. 
Fennen. I I. H. 

Fichter, Philip 
Fleck, -1888 

Follis, Geo. 

Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gad, Sophus 
Gadd. Ernst 
Garten, t'lnis 
Gartz, wm. 
Geensen, ,r. 
Gieger, Joseph 

ihl, loren 
Goedhnop, 11. 

Haldorsen, II. 
Hell, Wm. T. 
tarvorsen, i ilaf 

HsMvorsen. Isak 
llalvorsen, -1-118 
-'■n. -ll:T. 
llalvorsen. M. 
Hammargren, I >. 

liana. olaf O. 
Hansen, 1608 
Hansen. Frithjof 
Hansen. Harold O. 
Hansen. -1352 
Hansen, -1250 
Hansen, -1090 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen. -1769 
Hansen, -1729 
Hansen, A. C. 
Hansen, I,. P. 
Hansen. Hinlmnr 
Hansen. Thomas 
Hansen. -1609 
Harbeck, Theo. 
Harmening, F. 
Hartmann, G. 

Isaacson. Isaac 

Jach, Paul 
Jacobsen, J. 

.laoohsen, Peder 
Jackson, C. L. 
Jakobsen, N. S. 
Jakobsen, Ole 
Jansen, K. 
Jarvie, W. 

.hi i 126 
.i. us™. -1618 
Jensen. Henrik 
Jensen, -1279 
ii. -1326 

Jensen, -1733 
Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, Iver 
Jeisch, W. 
Johannessen, J. E. 
Johannessen, .1. E. 
Johannessen, M. E. 
Johannessen, J. 
Johannessen, -1656 



Anderson, -1229 
Anderson, - 1 169 
Anderson, -1620 
Anderson, Leonard 

Anderson, Emil 
Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson. Simon E. 
Anderson. Henry 
Anderson, Andrew N. 
Anderson, F. A. 
Anderson, -1026 
Andersson, -161 l 
Andersson. -1.'::.' 
Andersson, E. F. 
Amlreasen. O. L. 
Arbanen, V. E 
Arnesen, Adolf 
Aspen. Knut 
Axelsen, Axel 
Azelsen, I (erman 

Axelsson, C. B. 

Aylward, .las. 
Blair, Francis 
Bogdon, Wm. 
Bono, Viktor 

ng, J. F. 
Boss, L. A. 
Postrom, -643 
I Irandenburg, A..M.W 
Brandt, Otto 

Brandt, Gus 

Brenner, Ludv. 
Bridesen, John 
Brose, J. A. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Bruhn, Helnrlch 
Brumlinger, Paul 
Bryde, C. M. 
Burdick, ("has. 
Burmeister, S. 
Byl, Jacob 

Christiansen, lieint 
( 'hiistensen, M. 
i 'I rlstensen, John 
Christensen, Chr. 
Christensen M. H. 
Christensen, N. F. 
Christiansen, Ferd. 
Chrlstoffersen, Chr. 
Classen. Hinrieh 
C'aus, J. R. C. 
Clementz, Ole 
Colbensen, Alf. 
Cox, If. 
Crisp, E. 
Cronin, O. H. 
Curtis, R. H. 
I lisehler, Peter 
I >i. k.-nson, Joseph 
Dohman, F, 
Domnisk, H. 
Donovan, L. 
1 owling, S. Q. 
Doyle. W 
Dunn. C. W. 
Dunne, Joseph 
Engberg, Oscar 
Englund, HJalmar 
Ericksen, Karl H. 
Erlkson, Konrad 
Erikson, Samuel 
Erikson, 
Esnault, Geo. 
Erikson, Viktor 

Folts, Frank 
Forstrom, Slvert 
Frandsen, Niels 
Frederiksen, -."'32 
Froberg, Fred 
Frose, Elias 
Furlong, Wm. 

'lower, John 
Greiner, K. 
Grosman. R. 
Gundersen, L. S. 
Gundersen, .Martin 
Gunnarsson, Geo. 
Gustavson, Robert 
Guzak, B. 

Hartwlg, Kurt 
Hedberg, Alfred 
Hedlund, -1726 
Helcke, Paul 
Helander, H. 

Iiellesto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Helstrom, Chas. 
Helmer, Fritz 

Helmros, Gus. 
Ilenhusen, Peter 
Honge, Arthur 
Henkel, it. 
Henriks, Gus, 
Henrikson, Peter 
Hermann, Helge 
Hill. Gus. 

Hlllesvlg, Alf. 
-. B. 

i ii'iTin.i mi, Frits 
Hoist, Richard 
Holm, T. W. 
Holste, Willy 
Holstein, R. 
Iloting. H. 

I I listed. -. | |. 

Isberg, E. G. 

Johanson, a. 
Johanson, -1082 

Johanson. J. 
Johansen, 1677 
Johansen, -1821 
Johanson. Fn-, I 
Johanson, Edw. 
Johanson, -1334 
Johansson, K. H. 
Johnsen, T . P. K. 
Johnsen, - 1 
Johnsen, Andreas 
Johnsen, Martin 
Johnsen, Peter 
Johnsen, John Aug. 
Johnson, -1283 
Johnson, Einar 
Johnsen, C. II. 
Johnson, -1451 
Johnson, A. A. 
Jordan, Gus. 
Jorgensen, -1840 



Jorgensen, It. W. 
Jorgensen, Theo. 
Jurgensen, w. t». 

Jorgensen. A. I'. 
Juelsen, Ed. 

(Cahlsen, -1198 

Kalnisehke. Otto 
Kane. Ceo. 
Kails.-,,. Konrad 
Karlson, Ni 
Karlstrom, R. 
Keedel, Chas 
Kenniston, F. it. 
Kimeral. II. 
Klahn, Chas. 
Klemo. All'. 
Kiesow, Paul 

l.aakonen. J. V. 
Laakso, Axel 

I ia mm. P. 
I.aii.lliorg, C. W. 
Lang, Gus 
i. .Mme. Fred 

l.annqvist, O. 
Larsen, A. P. 

I. in sen. Bin 

en, -1658 
Larsen, Anton 

Larsen. Karl Chr 

Larsen, -1287 

1. arson, Niels A. 
I. arson, Chris 
Larson. 1,. M. 
Larson, Lam-its s. 
Larson, .644 
Larson, -1113 
I. arson, -H99 
Larson, -D'09 
Larson. -1288 
Larson. -1 in." 
Larson, - 1 117 
i..i\\son. John 
Latschlng. Evald 
Lauritsen, Geo. 
Lelno, Emil 
Lewzey, Geo. 
Linde, O. B. 

Maas, ltudolf 
Madsen, J. G. 
Mahsing, W. 
Malnmren. Wm. 
Malmqvist, E. J. 
Martin, C. S. 
Martin, Frank B. 
Mu tens. Jules 
Martinson. D. 
Mara, Heinrich 
Mathiesen, T. L. 
Mathlesen. Harry 
Mattson. Renhold 
Mattson, Mauritz 
mick, John 
McFall, Fred L. 
MeGoldrick. Jas. 

Naumann. Alf. 
Nelson, G. 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nelson, -906 
Nelson, Ole 
Nesblt, I. 
Nestor, Wilson 
Nieoln. D. 
Nielsen, A. C. 
Nielsen. -754 
\'ii lsen. -871 
Nielsen. -978 
Nielsen, George 

Ol.erg, -790 
1 'i lonnor, Geo. 
Oedekoven. Franz 
i lesterllng, Kmil 
Ofeldt. Kail 
ohlsson, Bertel 
1 Hunan, Aug. 
Oksanen, O. W. 
Olsen. Pet. 
< iisen. Soren 
Olsen, Eugene 
Olsen, -tan 
Olsen, -970 
<>!son. Theodor 
Olsen, -836 
Olsen, -812 
Olson, Carl 
Olsen. -534 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen. Ingval 

'ii. Johan 
Pankhurst, Thos. 
Paulsen. Einar 
Paulsen, M. P. C. 
Paulsen, -920 

laiison. Rudolph 
Fayne, R. 
Pearson. John S 
Pedersen, John 
Pedersen. Bertel 
Persson. H. W. 
ten, Hans 
Petersen, -782 
Petersen. -1223 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen. -709 

Kaahange, J. F. 
Ki.ila. Viktor 
Itandolf, D. W. 
Kantanen, W. 
itask. Hjalmar 
Rasmussen, Akton 
Raymond, M. L. 
Reese, -685 
Reilley, J. W. 

ilds, Thomas 
Riehelsen, P. 
Rintzo. John 
Robertson, Donald 

S.-iari. K. G. 
Sanders, Frank 
Sandqulst, G. 
Sarten, Chris 
Sauer, Emit 
Schelenz. Hans 
Sehmalkuehe, Fr. 



Juliusen, Jens 
Juliusen, Carl 

risen, Fred 
Jury, Chas. C. 



Kiesow. Paul 
Kofoed, Andreas 
Korneliusen. Ben 
Knopf. Fritz 
Krandsen, Niels 
Kreutzer, Karl 
Kristiansen, A. 
K rlstensen, Hans 
Kristophersen. Jacob 
Kragstad, E. 
Kiolmert. Alb. 
Kullman, Karl 

Linde, Bertel 
Lindhal, Michael 
l.iinlliolm, A. B. 
l.uiilliolm, Erik 
Llndholm, Arvid 
Lindkvist, A. I. 
Lindskog, C. O. T. 
Llndstrom, A. John 
Lohen, Fred 
Lohle. Martin 

hi . K . 
Dong. Harry 
Lubeck, R. A. 
Luckman, Ewald 
Ludvlgsen, Arne 

Lund. J. W. 
Lund. J. W. 
Lundberg, Carry 

I.undberg, K. J. 
Lundherg, .1 
l.undin. Anders 
Lungren. L. 
Leisiiiann, Fr. 
Derch, Paul 
Lersten, J. 
LevBen, R. J. 

l.'-wa Id. Harry A. 
Lewis. Walter 
Lewis, Geo 

McLean, John 
M.Leod, John A. 
Meland. Ingvalt 
Melander, C. G. 
Melin. Einar 
Buersman, A. 
Meyer, -1648 
Meyer. Fred 
Meyer, Frank 
Mikkelsen. A. S. 
Mikkclsen. E. C. O. 
Mikkelsen. Axel M. 
Milander, Karl 
.Mills. Geo 

Molile. OttO 

Mulley, Jas. 

Ni.lsen, Otto 
Nielsen, Fritz 

Nielsen, -717 
Nielsen, Henri 
Nilsen, Edvin 
Nils. -n. II. 
Nilson. Tohan 
Nilsson, Carl 
N'oril, Ben. 
Nordlof, s. 
Nordstrom. Emil 
Nyberg. Oscar 

Olsen, Olaf S. 
' 'lsen, -677 
Olson, Harold 
Olson. -697 
Olson, -978 
Olson, -562 
OlSSOn, Albin 
< ilsson, Philip 
• ipderbeck, Eugene 
O'Neill, F. J. 
1 >l dig, Bruno 
Ortiz. John 
Osborn, Winfred 
Osmundsen, - m :i 7 
' isterman, Karl 
Ottem. Aksel 
1 luchterlony, Fred 
Overbo, Nils 

Overland, Tom 
Peterson, S. 

Peterson. -1019 

Peterson. Axel 
i etschow, W. 
Pettersen, o. t. 
Pettersen, Karl J, 
I'etrow. F. 
Pheiffer, Karl 
Pletschmann, Geo. 
Pidersen, Olaf a. 
Pontynen, -1064 
Porrier, s. J. 
Prendl, I.udv. 
1'iinz. Chas. 
Probst, R. 



Rollo, R. 
Rolstad. O. E. 
Rono, Victor 
Rosbeck. Gus 

tigreen, A. 
Rosengren, Frans 
Rosenholm, O. 
Rosenstrom. Frank 
Rostad, Jacob 
Roth, Svend T. 
Rottol. A. S. 
Rudberg, C. 
Ryden, A. Oskar 

Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidt n. 

Schmuhl. Wm. 
Scholz, -1888 
Bchotls, Albert 
Schott, Herman 
Schroeder, Freu 



Selnvetzer, II. 
Selander, W. 
Sellen, Geo. 
Sexon, chas. 

Shawl, W. M. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Slmonsen, iMe.i 
■Siewertsen, Martin 
Sikman, A. 
PlndahL Jens 
Sorensen, -1607 
Skold, C. A. 
Smedsvlg, i 

Slaemmler, Hugo 
Stange, Anton 
Stein. G. 
Stervik. Ingvald 
Stone. L. W. 
Strokark, Paul 
SuckOW, Franz 
Smith, John A. 

Tauson, R. 

Til \ ares. J. E. 
Tennant, Thomas 
Thomasen, O. K. 
t hompsen, Th. 
Thorman, II. 
Thome. -656 
Thome, Gus 
'1 horn, Arvid 
Thornstrom, A. 
I li.usen, Johan 

Udbye, Harold 

\ ejoda, F. 
Verdick, <'. 
V'idot, Wm. 
Von Asperen, w. 

Wagner, Claude 
Warders, W. 
Wahlum, Gus. O. 

Wakely, it. S. 

Wall, erg, Rudolf 
Wallace, Geo. 
Walter, Erich 

U asenius, S. 
le, Fritz 
w esthofer, i (enry 
Westin, John 



Smith, John V. 
Sodergren, -1972 
Soderman, M. 
Sorensen, -1S22 
Soto, Pedro 
Speer, Kurt 
Spin, Knud A. 
Stremme). Harry 
Sullivan. Stephen 
Sunilnolin. Axel A. 
Sundl-erg. K. K. 
Sundkvist, Chas. 
Svendsen, -1903 
Svensen, Anker 
Svensson, -1796 
Svensson, -1188 
Swanne, 11. 
Swanson. Chas. 
Swensen, Otto 
Swenson, -1932 

'1 horsen, Torger 
'l obin, Austin 
Tollefsen, Andreas 

Eugene 
Trendl, Ludv. 
Trentanl, Lewis 
J um Rudolf 
Tuominen. A. 
Turner, Willy 
Turner, M. A. 
Turner, Ted 

tribe. Felix 

Von Galen, Last 
Von V'ersen. E. 
Vortman, Wm. 
Vucic, V. 

Westman, A. 
Wlberg, John 
Wieclimann, Aug. 

Wifstran.l. -'.•:;: 
Wikman, Peter 
VV illmann, W. 

WillS, Co, 

Winberg, oskar 
Wlscheropp, Fred 
Wold. Haakon 
Wyi bgel. -970 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Sam 


Aasprong. G. 




Albertsen, F. 


Andersen, A.. 




Ahlquist. A. 


Anderson, John 




Armstrong, Fr. 


Arnoia, Er. 




Anderson, G. 


Andeisen, A., -Iu57 




Andersen, w. 


.Anderson, C. 




Andersen, -1286 


Almeiua, J. C. 




iiiiiiiusen. O. 






Bowman, C. 


Bartholomew, W. 




..ailei, W. 


I.iander. W . 




Ljurk, A. 


Brucklond, E. 




1 Sell, A. 


Boe, D. 




i.litsh, G. 


luttgereit, L. 




Benson, C. 






. imense, Y. 


Deising, E. 




L/anberg, R. 


Ditlmeier, C. 




Lupon, J. 


i -team, Joe 




. alildorf, D. 


I ■ Groot, J. 




on, R. W. 


Emanuelson, A. 


Eliason, E. 


lai. kson, M. 




Edelman, G. 




Fianmng. K. 


Fu. lis, J. 




Fox. E. J. 


Forstrom, O. 




i'iathead. C. 






Guthrie, R. 


Gasman, G. 




sen, 11. 


Gundersen, O. 




Gjerund, B. 


(.oddard, M. 




Glsmervid, C. J. 


Graugard, L. 




, tansen, c. B, 


Haaland, J. 




llolmstrom, Ch. 


Hansen, Carl 




i la wicins, M. 


Hubenette, J. 




, leni ieksoll, M. 


llervig, J. 




Heart, Ch. 


liolten, O. J. 




rlarbeck, Th. 


Hicks, J. 




Hanson, G. 






i i -en, G. L. 


Johnson, Carl 




Johannesen, H. 


Jorgensen, J. P. 




Jsaaksen, G. 


Johansson, -151S 




Josepnsen, F. 


Jensen, J. M. 




Joransson, I'. J. 


Jansen, J., -1555 




.1 ..I in. son, -1461 






Kllntbom, M. 


Kalsen, C. 




Knudsen, 11., -419 


Koso. 1". 




Ketola. H. 


Klover. H., -463 




King, J. A. 






l.undin. A. 


Lomquist, O. 




Lauritson, G. 


Lundin, C. 




Lampo, N. 


Littorin. E. 




Lundblad, E. 


Lelitonen. W. 




Lunde. O. 


Larsen, E. A. 




l^udlovv, J. 


Larsn, K. J. 




Mailiohm, II. 


Mulley, J. 




Mortensen. Win. 


Melland, O. 




Miller, J. 






N\ stroni, E. 


Nilsen, Ed. 




Noidman, V. 


Nyman, A. 




Nielsen, A. 


Nystrom, R. 




Nelson, -906 






Olsen, E„ -515 


Olsson, Johan 




olsen, J. 






Prager, H. 


Peed, J. 




Poison, J. 


lei kins, D. 




Pedersen, N. C. 


Pierson, A. 




Porter, Ch. 


Passon, B. 




Palmroth, C. E. 






Roy, J. A. 


Rislaksen, O. 




Svensen, B. 


Swanson, J. 




Squires, J. 


Svensson, S. 




Simonsen, F. 


Swanne, H. 




Smith, C. 


Schmidt, Fr. 




1 iirmiuist, E. 


Thogersen, T. 




Uikblad, Otto 


Waring, H. 




W. lis, L. 







Honolulu Letter List. 



Anderson, S. K. 
Hiez, II. 
Kelninger, A. 



Pedersen, Adolf 
Ness, Edward 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Between King and Berry Streets, San Francisco. 

GENTS', BOYS', AND YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

609 Golden Gate Ave., Cor. Polk. 

Phone Market 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



SULLIVAN'S SHOES 



(Established 30 years.) 



For 

SEAMEN'S 

Use 




Union 

Made and 

Strong 



MARKET STREET near 8th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Sur- 
plus $ 2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in 
cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 38,156,931.28 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



DON'T WAIT FOR YOUR SHIP 
TO COME IN, 

But Begin Now to Save. 

$2.00 is enough to start with, then 
every opportunity, deposit your spare 
change. 

Your account will grow rapidly and 
you will be encouraged — ere you know 
it you will have a snug sum laid by. 

You will not only have what you 
save, but we will make what you save 
earn 3yi%, compounded semi-annual- 

ly. 

We are open Saturday evenings. 

The Market Street: Bank 

Market and Seventh Sts. 

Open Saturday afternoons and 
evenings. 

Safe deposit boxes $2.50 a year and up. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411, San Francisco| 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 

JOHN RBGNIER 

EXPRESSING 

Stand, 44-46 East Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 
CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



CAPT. CHRISTEINSBIN 

( POLORES 

Inventor of CHRISTENSEN'S 1 SOLAR AZIMUTH COMPASS 

( DISTANCE FINDER 
Has opened a School of Navigation at 82 MARKET STREET, ROOM 22, 
where practical navigation for passing U. S. examinations for steam and sail 
will be taught. 

Terms on application. 




CHARLES LYONS of London 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

SUITS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

OVERCOATS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

TROUSERS TO ORDER FROM $5.00 UP 

73l\rAN^ESS*AVE. \ SAN FRANCISCO 958 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 

Established 1886 




United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



Domestic and Naval. 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Room 3 



J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters 
Boss of the Road and Can't Bust 'Em Overalls, 75 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR WALK OVER SHOES 



Established 1877 



4. 






Cif 




VON SCHOEN'S 

Navigation 
School 

SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE, 



Steuart St. 



Near Folsom 



Masters, Mates, Pilots and Engineers prepared to pass EXAMINA- 
TION for United States License. 

SHIPS' COMPASSES ADJUSTED. 

Bedrooms can be had in the Institute at $6 and $8 per month. Bath.,. 
Officers' Sitting Room. 



The Swedish Yacht Club has ad- 
dressed an inquiry to the New York 
Yacht Club as to whether the latter 
would accept a Swedish challenge for 
the America's Cup. 

The management of the Illinois 
Central Railroad has decided to throw 
its influence in favor of a deep water- 
way from the Great Lakes to the Gulf. 

Efforts are being made in several of 
the principal Atlantic Coast ports to 
have adopted a uniform rule regulat- 
ing the limitation of a tow in harbors 
and rivers to 1500 feet. 

A dispatch from Canso recently told 
of the loss off Whitehead of the Brit- 
ish schooner Mary E. Smith, from 
Boston for Sydney, in ballast. The 
schooner struck rocks, and later was 
carried into deep water and foundered. 

Hoping that some company or indi- 
vidual will enter the Held and build a 
satisfactory submarine, Secretary of 
the Navy Metcalf has withheld about 
$500,000 of the appropriation made by 
the last Congress for such boats as a 
reward for the successful designer. 

The Arctic steamer Frithjof, which 
accompanied the Wellman expedition 
to Spitzbergen, was lost off Cape Lan- 
genes, Iceland, on October 5. The 
captain and fifteen of her crew were 
drowned. The engineer clung to a 
plank, on which he drifted ashore. 

It is reported that the Norwegian 
fruiters in the Central American fruit 
trade will displace the'r "home" crews 
with Chinese on account of the "un- 
reliability and intemperate habits" of 
the former. The number of Chinese 
to be employed is estimated at 1050. 

The Austrian steamer Giulia, 
which arrived at New York on Octo- 
ber 10 from Trieste with 763 passen- 
gers, had a narrow escape from de- 
struction by fire in midocean during 
a violent storm on October 3. The 
crew fought the flames all day before 
they were extinguished. 

President Roosevelt, on October 4, 
wired the Inspector of Hulls at Evans- 
ville, Ind., instructing him, if possible, 
to immediately suspend the license of 
the master of the steamer Fred Hart- 
wig on account of irregularity in his 
conduct. 

Only one American company, the 
American-Hawaiian Steamship Com- 
pany, has accepted the Navy Depart- 
ment's offer to transport coal for the 
Atlantic battleship fleet at 50 per cent 
increase over the rate offered by firms 
shipping it in foreign bottoms. 

It is announced that the Cunard 
Steamship Company has accepted an 
offer of Charles Frohman to give 
theatrical performances on the big 
liners by regular players, who for the 
time being may be traveling to and 
from the United States and England. 

The Coastwise Transportation Com- 
pany, owners of the seven-masted 
schooner Thomas W. Lawson, and the 
Sun Oil Company, of Philadelphia, 
Pa., to which port the Lawson was 
chartered, have come to an amicable 
agreement in regard to a recent libel 
suit filed against the Lawson for $259,- 
000. 

The Cunard liner Lusitania arrived 
at New York on October 11 from 
Liverpool, breaking all transatlantic 
records. The passage from Daunts' 
Rock to Sandy Hook occupied four 
days and twenty hours, an average of 
almost exactly twenty-four knots per 
hour. The best day's run was 619 
knots, which is nine knots better than 
the previous record, held by the 
Deutschland. 



16 



coast seamen's journal. 



With the Wits. 



Stationary Waltzing — "You let him 
hug you in the conservatory." 

"I did not. I made him remove his 
;irm every time the music in the ball- 
room stopped."— Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



The Chronic Grouch. — "Ah!" ex- 
claimed the optimist, "isn't the sun- 
shine lovelj and bright this morning?" 

"Huh!" grunted the pessimist, "it's 
casting shadows somewhere." — Phila- 
delphia Press. 



Comparison.— Mrs. Johnston (over 
the tuh) — "Doan Ah mek yo' a 

livin'. Henry Clay Johnston?" 

Mr. Johnston "Tol'ble, chile — tol'- 
ble. But yo' sh'd have seen de way 
inah mothah suppohted ma fathah!" 



Both Sides of It.— She— "Don't 
those lonely dinners at the club drive 
many a bachelor to matrimony?" 

He — "Yes, I believe so. And the 
Strenuous dinners at home drive many 
a married man to the club." — Chicago 
New s. 



Proof. — Mrs. A. — "And are yolir 
neighbors fond of you?" 

Mrs. B. — "Very. Just think! When 
I told them we wanted to move, but 
couldn't afford to. they offered to pay 
all our moving expenses." — Illustrated 
Hits. 



Henry Scored a Hit. — "Henry," said 
a teacher to a boy in her class, "name 
some of the chief beauties in educa- 
tion." 

"School mistresses," answered the 
lad. smiling. — Philadelphia Inquirer. 



The Eternal Feminine. — "My dear, 
what on earth made you buy that 
dre^s when you know you look your 
worst in blue?" 

"Yes, 1 know, but that shade is aw- 
fully becoming to that horrid Trotter 
girl, and I was just determined she 
shouldn't get it." — Baltimore Ameri- 
can. 



A Compromise- W'edilerly — "My 
wife and I went down town to select 
,i new rug for our parlor this morn- 
ing. She liked one pattern and I liked 
another." 

Singleton — "What did you do about 
it?" 

Wedderly — "Oh, we compromised 
on the one -he liked." — Chicago 
News. 



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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXI, No. 5. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1907. 


Whole No. 1045. 



THE HAMMOND INJUNCTION. 



FOLLOWING is the full decision of the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals, 
dismissing the appeal of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific and Pacific Coast Marine 
Firemen's Union against the injunction granted 
the Hammond Lumber Company during the 
strike of last year: 

No. 1400. 
UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF AP- 
PEALS FOR THE NINTH DISTRICT. 



Sailors' Union of the Pacific, and Pacific Coast 
Marine Firemen's Union, Appellants, 

vs. 
Hammond Lumber Company (a corporation), 

Appellee. 



H. W. Hutton, for the Appellants; Henry Ach, 
J. W. Dorsey and Chas. Page, for the Appellee. 

Before Gilbert, Circuit Judge, and De Haven 
and Hunt, District Judges. 



The appeal in this case is from an interlocutory 
order granting an injunction pendente lite. The 
appellee brought a bill in equity in which it is 
alleged that it is a New Jersey corporation en- 
gaged in the lumber business and in carrying pas- 
sengers and freight to and from various ports in 
California, using for that purpose three sea-going 
vessels; that in June, 1906, the appellants con- 
spired and threatened to prevent and to continue 
to prevent the appellee's vessels from leaving the 
port of San Francisco with crews of its own 
watchmen and guards, and that in pursuance of 
such conspiracy, they endeavored forcibly to re- 
move one of the appellee's employes, and pin- 
ioned and imprisoned another of its employes, 
and committed many other acts of violence and 
unlawful interference with the business of the 
appellee; that the acts and doings of the appel- 
lants have become widely known and that the 
appellants threaten to repeat and continue such 
acts and prevent the vessels of the appellee from 
leaving the port, and from carrying passengers, 
and to interfere with and prevent the appellee 
from continuing its business; that such acts do 
interfere with the business of the appellee and 
its vessels and that, if they are permitted to con- 
tinue, the appellee will suffer irreparable dam- 
age, in that crews can not be secured to man its 
vessels nor can freight be secured to load its 
vessels; that the appellants are insolvent and 
without money or property sufficient to pay the 
damage sustained; that the appellee has already 
suffered through the acts complained of, in a 
sum exceeding $10,000.00; that an attempt to 
recover damages at law would require a mul- 
tiplicity ot suits; tnat, unless the acts of the ap- 
pellants are restrained, the business of the ap- 
pellee and its vessels will be totally destroyed, 
and that the appellee has no adequate remedy 
at law. The bill was supported by numerous 
affidavits showing that on or about June 1, 1906, 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific demanded of the 
San Francisco shipowners a wage increase of 
$5.00 per month in all steam-schooners, which 
was refused; that thereupon the Unions struck; 
that the appellants created an Executive Com- 
mittee known as the Strike Committee, com- 



posed of seven members of the Sailois' Union 
of the Pacific, two members of the Pacific Coast 
Marine Firemen's Union and two members of 
the Marine Cooks aiid Stewards' Association; 
that between fifty and sixty vessels were in- 
volved in the strike; that the said committee 
bought a launch and hired another, both launches 
being manned by members of the three unions 
and used as picket boats; and that the water 
front was also picketed by strikers. The affidavits 
showed specific acts of violence committed by 
the Unions on the dates of June 5, June 17, 
June 27, June 30, July 3, July 4 and July 11; 
that at all these various dates men on the 
launches forcibly boarded vessels in the harbor, 
made threats of bodily injury to the officers in 
charge, terrorized passengers, to whom they used 
profane, insulting and obscene language, com- 
mitted brutal assaults upon crews, firemen, cooks 
and stewards and committed other acts, showing 
that they were in the active prosecution of an 
unlawful plan to interfere with, harass, annoy 
and prevent the operation of the vessels and 
destroy the business and property of every non- 
union shipowner in the port of San Francisco 
for the purpose of coercing them into yielding 
to their demand. 

Gilbert, Circuit Judge, after stating the case as 
above, delivered the opinion of the court. 

It is contended that the restraining order is- 
sued on July 13, 1906, was wrongfully issued for 
the reason that no bond therefor was filed. The 
application for the restraining order was made 
on July 9, 1906, and the bond bearing that date 
had been prepared for that purpose. The court, 
instead of granting the order on that date, made 
an order to show cause on July 13, and, on that 
day granted a temporary restraining order, di- 
rected that the application for an injunction pen- 
dente lite be heard at a future day, and ordered 
that the temporary restraining order issue on 
the execution and filing by the appellee of a 
bond in the sum of one thousand dollars to be 
approved by the clerk. Immediately thereafter, 
on July 13, the sureties on the bond which bore 
the date of July 9, justified thereto before the 
clerk, and the clerk approved the bond and filed 
the same. Subsequently, on August 8, 1906, the 
Court granted an injunction pendente lite upon 
the execution of the bond and on the same day 
the requisite bond was filed by the appellee in 
compliance with the order of the Court. The 
appeal is taken from the order of the Court so 
mule on August 8, 1906. The bond was valid not- 
withstanding that its date was four days prior 
to the date when it was filed. The date of a bond 
is not an essential part of it. The instrument 
talcs effect from the time of its filing. Williams 
vs. McComas, 27 Ala., 572; Jenkins vs. Kay, 28 
M<1. 547. Counsel for the appellants cites the 
decision of this Court in Tyler Min. Co. vs. Last 
Chance Min. Co., 90 Fed., 15, in which it was 
held thai the liability of a surety can not be ex- 
tended by implication beyond the expressed terms 
of his contract. But in that case the bond had 
been Riven to procure a restraining order enjoin- 
ing the defendant in the suit from working a cer- 
tain portion of the mine and from removing or 
appropriating ore previously taken therefrom. A 
subsequent order was made which continued such 
restraining order in force, but modified and 
changed it by permitting the working of the mine 



and the disposition of the ore taken therefrom 
under regulations prescribed by the court. It was 
held that the surety could not be held liable for 
damages accruing to the defendants under the 
modified order. There is no such question in the 
present case. The sureties on the bond in this 
case justified thereon on the very day on which 
the order was made and the bond was filed upon 
that date and approved by the clerk. It thereby 
became the bond upon which the order was 
granted, and it was from that date the valid obli- 
gation of the sureties. 

It is contended that the issuance of the restrain- 
ing order and the injunction were in excess of 
the court's jurisdiction, and that, although there 
are decisions of the Circuit and District Courts 
of the United States which sustain such jurisdic- 
tion, the use of the writ of injunction for the 
purposes sought in the bill in the present case 
has not been countenanced by any decision of 
the Supreme Court of the United States. The 
affidavits sufficiently show a combination of per- 
sons by concerted action to accomplish an un- 
lawful purpose. It needs no citation of authori- 
ties to sustain the proposition that the appellee 
had the right to contract to employ labor and to 
carry on its business as it saw fit without inter- 
ference from others, and that any attempt to 
compel an individual, firm or corporation to re- 
frain from employing men or to prevent any man 
or men from working for another is an unlaw- 
ful interference with a property right. That such 
interference may, under well established equitable 
principles, be restrained by injunction, is abund- 
antly sustained by the courts of this country and 
of England. In re Debs, 158 U. S., 564; Arthur 
vs. Oakes, 11 C. C. A., 209; Hagan vs. Brindell, 
6 C. C. A., 86; Jonas Glass Co. vs. U. S. etc. 
Glass Blowers' Assn., 64 N. J. Eq., 640; Vegelahn 
vs. Gunther, 44 N. E., 1077; The Taff Vale Rail- 
way Co. vs. The Amalgamated Society of R. R. 
Servants, App. Cas. Law Reports, 1901, page 426. 

It is urged that the injunction was violative of 
the rights of the appellants, that the defendant 
unions and their members had the right to en- 
deavor to improve their conditions and lo organ- 
ize for that purpose, and that the right to com- 
municate their desires to others, whether they 
were in the employment of the appellee or not, 
and to explain the differences that existed be- 
tween their former employers and themselves, 
and that if it became necessary to employ launches 
to carry out these purposes, they had the legal 
right to do so, as the waters of the Bay of San 
Francisco arc free to all. Conceding that the 
appellants had all of these rights, the argument 
ignores the salient Facts brought to the attention 
of the Court by the bill and the affidavits. It was 
not to prevent the exercise of any such rights 
that the injunction was sought or obtained. Its 
purpose was to prevent acts of lawlessness, of 
violence, of insult and of intimidation. No one 
can read the affidavits without arriving at the 
conclusion that members of the unions went far 
beyond the peaceful communication of theil 
rights, their attitude toward their former em 
ployers, their purpose of self-protection and the 
objects of their combinal ion. It may be true in 
the present case, as in many others of a similar 
character, that the disorders of the strike were 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



REVELATION OF REMOTE PAST. 



Professor Sayce, in the Contemporary 
Review, describes and gives tentative trans- 
lations of several of the tablets of Kara 
Eyuk; but until further material is forth- 
coming some of the rather startling elements 
of civilization he describes must be received 
with caution. The tablets were in almost 
all cases commercial documents or letters, 
and some of the Chantre tablets are tax or 
tribute lists. 

The script of the documents and the prop- 
er names show that they are the records of 
a trading colony from Assyria settled in 
Cappadocia in about the twentieth century 
before our era. The language of the tablets 
is Assyrian; but several of the tablets con- 
tain foreign words, probably Hittite. These 
tablets show a highly developed trading 
community — perhaps from the autonomous 
position they appear to have held a kind of 
primitive "Chartered Company ' — who 
worked the mineral wealth of Cappadocia — 
gold, mostly alluvial, silver, copper, lead, 
timber; also they dealt at a later time in 
horses, mules, wool and goat hair. They 
imported in return textile goods — many of 
the tablets contain lists of cloth and gar- 
ments. These tablets are of great impor- 
tance; for one reason, they show most 
clearly the antiquity of the Hittite civiliza- 
tion — the curious people whose monuments, 
inscribed with strange hieroglyphic signs, 
are found from Charchemish, on the Eu- 
phrates, to Karabel, on the shores of the 
Aegean. This civilization must be older, 
then, than B. C. 1900. These people were 
traders, and specially worked the silver 
mines of the Taurus and Asia Minor, near to 
which their inscriptions are almost invari- 
ably found. These people, too, it was who 
opened up the great trade roads which 
ran from the Euphrates, through the passes 
of the Taurus, the Cilician gates, to the 
Aegean. These roads, being open, ren- 
dered it easy for the Assyrian colonists to 
extend their trade over Asia .Minor; but 
these tablets reveal another most interest- 
ing feature — the existence of a regular pos- 
tal service. That such a service existed in 
Babylonia at this time, as shown by the 
royal and private correspondence of the 
period, there is every reason to suppose, 
but here there is distinct proof. Lists of 
these letter carriers are found ; and in one 
letter the writer says: "When the postman 
has received his orders, do not detain him." 
In another letter there is an interesting ref- 
erence to the roads ; the writer says to the 
postman : "You must know the roads from 
carrying so many letters." 

This is certainly the earliest reference to 
a regular postal sercice. We know that 
one was in existence between Western Asia 
and Egypt during the eighteenth dynasty, 
about B. C. 1400; also in Babylon during 
the Late Empire and under the Persians. It 
was fully developed in Egypt under the 
Ptolemies, as shown by the recent discov- 
ery at Oxyrhyncus of a set of postal reg- 
isters. The details as to the administration 
of this colony are extremely interesting, be- 
cause they show a wonderful independence. 
The chief official was the Limmu, or 
"eponymous archon," in whose year of of- 
fice all documents were dated ; there was a 
governor, a chief judge. Soldiers were 
mentioned, but they appear to have been in 
a company's service. There were commer- 
cial travelers in Babylonia and probably the 



code of Khammurabi ruled the affairs of 
trade. The medium of commerce was of 
two kinds. "Sealed money" was no doubt 
the forerunner of coinage, and it must be 
remembered that the Lydians were the first 
to use coins. The other is called "horned 
silver," evidently the small silver coins rep- 
resented on the monuments as the tribute 
of Syria. The existence of this Assyrian 
colony in Cappadocia shows us how it was 
that Babylonian legends passed into Asia 
Minor and thence to Greece; the legends of 
Gilgames becoming those of Herakles, and 
those of Istar and Tammuz becoming at- 
tached to Kybele and Atys. The discovery 
is of the utmost importance as linking Greek 
and ( )riental culture. 



NOT A QUESTION OF COLOR. 



The first objection is a very practical one 
indeed. It is not to the Asiatic's color, for 
nobody has anything to say against brown 
or yellow. They are both quite nice colors. 
It is to his capacity for living on a good 
deal less than that on which the white man 
can live — in other words, to his lower stand- 
ard of comfort. Supposing a lot of white 
men, men as white as snow, were to invade 
Lancashire or Yorkshire and show them- 
selves to be just as good workmen as the 
"hands" already there, and yet at the same 
time be pleased to work for half the 
"hands' " wages, don't you think there would 
be a great deal of trouble and bother? 
These white-as-snow men might say, "We 
arc just as good as you are ; as skillful work- 
men, as sober citizens, as moral human 
beings. All we ask is to be let alone. Why 
can't you let us alone, then?" Do you think, 
1 put it to you, that Lancashire and York- 
shire would so much as consent to argue the 
matter? Would you, you who read this ar- 
ticle, would you consent to argue the mat- 
ter? 

The next objection is the extraordinary 
fertility of the yellows and browns. They 
are reckless of Malthusian deductions. So 
fertile are they that their unrestricted immi- 
gration into any self-governing colony 
would mean, in a few generations, the com- 
plete destruction of that colony as a white 
settlement with a white future. It would 
not be a case of white living side by side 
with yellow or brown, but of white living — 
and hardly that, just existing, let us say — 
underneath yellow and brown. The white 
men would be overwhelmed, submerged, by 
the countless millions of yellow and brown 
men. 

Looked at from the point of view of a god 
who sits up above the w'orld and knows 
everything, that might be a very good thing 
to happen ; but you can't expect the white 
men to see it in that impartial godlike light, 
can you? We all have a prejudice in favor 
of ourselves, of our self-persistence. It may 
not be a sound prejudice, it may be quite un- 
reasonable, but there it is. And it is for 
prejudices, not for reasoned convictions, 
that men have always waged the longest 
and the most implacable wars. 

Then there is that objection, subtler, more 
elusive, than the others, but. perhaps the 
strongest of all. It is that difference I spoke 
of between the Asiatic and the Western 
mind and temperament. It is no question of 
superiority. It is impossible to get a stand- 
ard by which we can measure brown against 
white or yellow against either. The Japa- 



ness possess, in the highest degree, some of 
the finest qualities of mankind; the Indian 
brain is of a subtlety compared to which the 
European brain is coarseness itself. The 
difference is a difference beneath the skin, 
deeper than the heart; in the very soul itself. 
Our view of sex, for example, may be a 
wrong view, at bottom an immoral view, 
but it is our view; it is different from the 
Asiatic's; and there is nothing that sepa- 
rates man from man so impassably as a dif- 
ference in view of the sex. The barrier 
which keeps East from West is impalpable, 
but it is impassable, too. 

So, I suggest to you, and this is all I want 
to suggest to you, that the trouble between 
yellow and white in California is, though 
in a far-off way, our trouble, too, and that 
should it become acute, should the clouds 
not pass away, but gather, then, alliances 
notwithstanding, white man will be found 
by white man's side, for blood is thicker 
than water, and prejudice beats reason every 
time. 

When, if ever, yellow and brown chal- 
lenge white, there will be no arguing, there 
won't be much talking even ; there will be 
a rush to the guns. — Hubert, In London 
Sunday Chronicle. 



LIQUOR USED IN UNITED KINGDOM. 



The consumption of spirits in the United 
Kingdom was 0.95 gallon to the inhabitant 
in 1830, 0.80 in 1840, 0.88 in 1850, 0.95 in 
1860, 1.01 in 1870, 1.06 in 1881 and 0.96 
in 1888. That is, in a period of nearly sixty 
years there was one decade which showed 
a marked decline, then there was an increase 
through four decades, then another decline 
that brings the last figure and the first very 
close together. 

Turning from these old statistics to more 
recent ones, we find that for the year 1899- 
1900 the consumption was 1.18 gallons per 
inhabitant, which makes a considerable ad- 
vance over anything we have noted, and this 
increase was the subject of some discour- 
aging comment. But since 1900 there has 
been another decline, and a very rapid one, 
to 0.91 gallon, which leaves only the years 
1830 and 1840 with a lower record in the list 
that we have given. 

In beer consumption the average for Eng- 
land and Wales was reported as follows for 
the periods named : 1801-1830, 30 gallons 
per inhabitant; 1831-1860, 83 gallons; 1861- 
1880, 36 gallons. The consumption for the 
United Kingdom during the year 1899-1900, 
32.29 gallons and in 1906-1907 it was only 
27.81. There has been a falling off, there- 
fore, in the consumption of both beer and 
spirits that is remarkable and gratifying, but 
the comparison extending over a long series 
of years indicates that fluctuations may be 
expected, rather than a persistent decrease 
with the passing of the decades. It is to 
be hoped, however, that permanent gains 
have been made for temperance throughout 
the country, and it appears, at any rate, that 
liquor dealers have met with discourage- 
ment in their trade, for in ten years the 
brewers' licenses have decreased from 8305 
to 4985, and the licenses to trades in intoxi- 
cants from 233,702 to 222,394. — Chicago 
Record-Herald. 



For fac-similes of union labels see the Jour- 
nal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




NO "RIGHT TIME." 



Over lunch the observatory professor told 
me something of the triumphs of man over 
time ; for man has begun to master the clock, 
and my astronomer dropped his shamefaced- 
ness after lunch when he confessed the de- 
ception that Greenwich has imposed on the 
world. There are two fundamental lines 
that encircle the earth, one the equator, to 
which is due respect. What should be the 
other? The meridians of Jerusalem and of 
Rome and of the Great Pyramid were sug- 
gested as the cross line that should start the 
time of day. But the supremacy of Great 
Britain on the seas, the necessity of accurate 
measuring of hours and minutes, brought 
the center of the world to Greenwich ; and 
Greenwich set to work to tell the time, and 
nowadays, when Greenwich says it is noon, 
it is noon. It is usually a compromise. The 
line might have been drawn over any other 
point of the world's surface. But Greenwich 
has it, and sets the mean time. And when 
it is to-day in Greenwich it is this evening in 
other places and yesterday or to-morrow in 
others. 

For when railways came, and swift steam- 
ships and men ran to and fro, Greenwich 
spread its compromise, the world went on 
spinning as usual; but men spun faster. The 
coach passenger's watch in London would 
take him without disaster to Edinburgh, 
while the voyager to America had probabaly 
forgotten all about time in the wonders of 
space. But when men began to travel 
swiftly and far it was necessary to come 
to some agreement about time, since it would 
never do to fiddle with the watch or reset the 
clock at every station between here and 
Penzance. It was necessary to compromise, 
and compromise always implies a certain 
amount of deceit. 

Therefore, Greenwich made out its time, 
which is never the right time, and the world 
mapped itself out into four-and-twenty 
chunks. If you go round the world you lose 
a day or gain it, according to your route. 
And thus you will perceive that our astron- 
omer has turned time to human devices. 
There are many important places in the 
world that are lured by Greenwich to get up 
half an hour earlier than they suspect or to 
lie abed half an hour later than they hoped. 
For example, the man at Penzance who 
wants to get up at 8 o'clock is turned out of 
bed twenty-three minutes earlier than the 
man in London. He never notices the dif- 
ference. But the gas companies at Berne 
notice it; for Berne is on the edge of mid- 
European time, and the Bernese go to bed 
before they have consumed sufficient gas to 
satisfy dividends. The companies begged 
that Berne should be hoisted into the next 
division, see less daylight and use more gas. 

There is no such thing as time — the right 
time — and if there were it would depend up- 
on space which we are supposed to be an- 
nihilating. Already, when we voyage across 
the Atlantic, the captain tampers with the 
clock in the night, robs us of half an hour's 
sleep one way every night, and gives it back 
on the return journey, and no one notices 
the fraud. There are places on the ocean 
where a ship's captain — inspired by the 
fraudulent transactions of Greenwich — 



filches a whole day from his passengers or 
condemns them to an extra day of this trans- 
itory life. No one grumbles, for no one suf- 
fers inconvenience. And I think that, on the 
whole, I should welcome Mr. Willett's proj- 
ect of luring me from my bed and giving me 
the light of a whole day in summer and per- 
mitting me to pay back the debt by install- 
ments in bed in the winter. I pointed out 
the situation to my astronomer friend and 
asked him whether, as he was obviously 
quite unscrupulous in the matter of time, as 
he was putting an admittedly adulterated 
article on the market, he could not go a step 
farther. — London Chronicle. 



CANADA'S SUBSIDY POLICY. 



An Ottawa newspaper, understood to be 
the organ of the Canadian Government, says 
that a definite offer has been made by a 
company to undertake a fast steamship 
service on the Atlantic as part of the All-Red 
project, connecting Great Britain with 
China, via Canada, for a subsidy of $2,500,- 
000 a year, and the Canadian Government, 
through the Prime Minister, has offered to 
bear half the cost of this subsidy and con- 
tribute $1,250,000 annually. This would leave 
the British Government to make up the other 
half and the Australian and New Zealand 
governments to contribute the major por- 
tion to obtain the All-Red line which has 
been discussed recently. The newspaper 
states that it is believed the British Govern- 
ment will announce soon that it is prepared 
to bear its share of the expense of establish- 
ing the service. The London Economist in 
speaking on this proposed fast line by way 
of Canada to India, says: 

"The Canadian Pacific Railway frequently 
carries small bodies of troops to and from 
the China stations, but rarely carries any 
coming from or destined for India. The 
reason is that Bombay is within twenty days 
of Southampton by way of Gibraltar and the 
Suez Canal. Obviously that time could not 
be equaled or even approached by way of 
Canada with eighteen-knot ships or any oth- 
er ships on the Atlantic and Pacific. The 
Canadian Pacific performs a considerable 
feat in carrying the mails from England to 
Hongkong in twenty-nine days or less, hav- 
ing regard to the length of the journey and 
the stops at Japanese ports; but mails from 
London can be landed at Shanghai by the 
Siberian Railway in twenty days or less, 
and no new service which money could 
place on the Canadian route could possibly 
do as well as that. All that can be accom- 
plished by the All-Red project through 
Canada is the reduction of time for pass- 
engers between England and Australia, and 
between England, China and Japan, though 
in the latter instance the Siberian route will 
always be the quicker. Freight between 
these countries will continue to go by the 
all-water routes. It may be doubted whether 
the Canadian line could reduce freight rales, 
but if they succeeded in doing so, if they give 
us lower export rates than we now enjoy, 
they would to that extent be employing the 
British portion of their subsidy in augment- 
ing Canadian competition with the British 
farmer, which, from his point of view, would 
be rather absurd." 



WATERWAY TO THE GULF. 



The Lakes-to-the-Gulf project is for a 
fourteen-foot waterway from Chicago, 
through the Chicago Drainage Canal, the 
Illinois River and the Mississippi River to 
Memphis. Below Memphis the Government 
is already improving the river to that depth. 
The Missouri Valley River Improvement 
Association was organized for the purpose 
of pushing the project for a similar depth of 
water in the Missouri. Both plans are de- 
clared practical by Government engineers. 
The estimated cost of the Chicago-Memphis 
section is $100,000,000, while the estimate for 
the Missouri to Kansas City is $20,000,000. 

The cutting of the canal across the Isth- 
mus of Panama makes such a waterway an 
absolute necessity if the West is to ol tain 
any of the benefits of the canal. The comple- 
tion of the waterway will make St. Louis, 
Chicago and Kansas City practically ocean 
ports with three water routes to the sea, 
through the Mississippi to the Gulf, through 
the Lakes and the Erie Canal to New York, 
or through the St. Lawrence to the Atlantic. 
But by way of the two latter routes it would 
be necessary to make transfers at Buffalo 
to smaller boats and again at New York or 
Montreal to ocean-going steamers. 

Through the Mississippi River and Gulf 
route boats loaded at Chicago, St. Louis 
or Kansas City could go to any port in the 
world. 

The Chicago sanitary and ship canal is 
the most important link in the proposed 
waterway, 328 miles in length, to connect the 
Great Lakes with the Mississippi River. As 
a ship canal it is regarded as one of the 
greatest artificial waterways of the world. 

The idea of a ship canal connecting the 
Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico is not 
by any means a new one. 

In 1889 the General Assembly of Illinois 
passed a law for the construction of a sani- 
tary canal which would cause the Chicago 
River to reverse itself and instead of being 
a tributary to Lake Michigan to become an 
outlet for the Lake. The work on the canal 
began September 3, 1892, and the water 
was turned into it from the Lake January 2, 
1900. Up to April 1, 1906, over fifty million 
dollars has been expended in the various de- 
tails of the work, and little remains to com- 
plete it. The canal proper is 28 miles in 
length, but in addition to this, six miles of 
the Chicago River and eight miles of the 
Desplaines River have been placed under 
control of the sanitary trustees, making the 
total length of the sanitary canal 42 miles. 
From Lockport to St. Louis the minimum 
depth will vary from 14 to 22 feet, and the 
estimated cost is $27,000,000, not including 
the sum of $3,000,000 that Chicago is to ex- 
pend on the section between Lockport and 
Lake Joliet. 

The proposal of the trustees of the sani- 
tary district is to turn over to the general 
Government this canal, as a voluntary offer- 
ing to the proposed deep waterway, without 
other consideration than that the Govern- 
ment shall complete the canal to St. Louis. — 
Kansas City Star. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The Pullman Company has signified 

its intention of withdrawing from 
Texas rather than pay the levy of 
for taxes which has been 
made against it. 

Six prominent Milwaukee men, 
charged with conspiracy to defraud 
the Government out of valuable coal 
land in ( held for trial 

at Denver, Col., on October 18. 

The vibrations of an earthquake 
were felt at Lowell, Mass., and all 
suburban towns on October IS. The 
shock lasted two or three seconds and 
was followed by what appeared to be 
a sharp explosion. 

Mrs. Cassie Chadwick, whose amaz- 
ing financial transactions culminated 
in the wrecking of an Oberlin bank, 
died in the Ohio penitentiary on Oc- 
tober 10. Mrs. Chadwick was serving 
a ten years' sentence. 

A report issued by the Safe Roads 
Automobile Association shows that 
between June 21 and September 21 
of this year forty-one persons were 
killed and 313 injured as a result of 
automobile accidents in Massachu- 
setts. 

Goodman Phillips and James B. 
Lehneman, in the United States Dis- 
trict Court at Boston, Mass., pleaded 
guilty t<> conspiracy in connection 
with the smuggling of Chinese into 
Providence on the schooner yacht 
Frolic. Sentence was deferred. 

The highest altitude ever reached 
by a kite in this country was recorded 
on October 3 at the Mount Weather 
station, in Virginia, when an altitude 
of slightly over 23,000 feet was at- 
tained. At that height a temperature 
of live degrees below zero was re- 
corded. 

William A. Martin has been sen- 
tenced to three years* imprisonment 
for grafting while a member of the 
Pittsburg (Pa.) City Council. Martin 
was convicted of soliciting a bribe of 
$70,000 from the Tube City Railroad, 
which had an ordinance pending in 
the Council. 

A run on the Farmers and Mer- 
chants' Bank of Minneapolis, Minn., 
which had been developing for sev- 
eral days, culminated on October 10. 
when about $200,000 was drawn but. 
During the week $400,000 was drawn 
out, out of a total deposit of about 
$13,(100.000. 

Mayor Whitlock of Toledo, Ohio, 
has declined the Democratic nomina 
tion for Mayor, on the ground that 
the convention failed to indorse the 
principles of the Independent party. 
All other Independent candidates for 
city offices indorsed by the Democrats 
declined to permit their names to go 
upon the Democratic ticket. 

Captain Roald Amundsen, the Arc- 
tic explorer, announces that he will 
reach the North Pole in 1910. He 
said, also, that he expected to peti- 
tion the United States Government to 
allow his vessel, the Gjoa, in which 
he navigated the Northwest Passage 
in 1904, to be the first to pass through 
the Panama Canal upon its comple- 
tion. 

The Marconi wireless station at 
Glace Bay, N. S., flashed to the sta- 
tion at Clifden, on the coast of Ire- 
land, a message from Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier, Premier of Canada, con- 
gratulating the English people upon 
the inauguration of transatlantic wire- 
less communication. This exchange 
of messages signifies the opening of 
the transatlantic wireless system for 
commercial purposes. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing" Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



Anderson, -988 Kulman, G. H. 

Anderson. -897 i Registered letter) 

Anelsson, Karl B. Kristensen. Peter 

Anderson, Charles Kennedy, J. 

ii. V. -1240 Kishl, Hans 

Andersen. -1305 Karlson. Gustaf 

Anderson, Albin Koimagoret, Anatel 



Anderson, -1118 
Andersson, Patrick 
Brusbard, 1402 
Behrens, F. 
Bortrom, Wm. 
Bade, Alex. 
Benson, Ray 
Bouton, Eugene 



K. ek, Albert 
Lindow, E. 
Lukkima, Mr. 
Bind, Gus A. 
I.utter, Franz 
Bindholm, Nestor 
Luckman, Thorwald 
Barsen, Alf. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS. 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Blom, Ch. A. -1166 Barsen, P. -1179 
Bedford, Arthur Barsen, Eivind 

Bundesen, Jens Bouis, Coadon 

Brander, W. -138fBouncke, A. -1321 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M 



BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1S86, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




GISTE-H* 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. 



Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFF1TT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place.Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



Brag, John K 
Bee, Colin 
Bergersen, Alf. 
Benreu, John E. 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
Bergstrom, Frame 
Blom, Filip 
Brussel, Edward 
Bringager, A. H. 

h, Borge 
Carlson. G. A 
Carlson, C. E. 



Lewis, John 
Barsen, Axel 
Lindholm, C. 
Borentzen, Hilmer 
Bundstedt, C. 
Bindroos, Askar A. 
Baine, Frank 
Be Goff. Sylvian 
Maack, Hans 
Markman, H. 
Martinson. August 
903Martin. John B. 



Christiansen, LudvlgMalmbei g, Robe i 



Christensen, M. 
Cohrt, Herman 
Collberg, Chas. 
Christoffersen, A. 
Coeeine, Bouis 
Christiansen, -901 
Cooley, J. H. B. 
Corre. Pierre 
Carnaghan, Wm. 
Cook. Harry 
Carlson, Aksel 



Miller, James 
Mahrlng W. 
McDonald, N. 
Maibohm, Hans 
Munroe, H. G. 
McBeod 

Mikkelsen, B. -1445 
Mannitrom, W. 
Mattson, J . 
Miller, James 
Magel, Fred 
Christensen, Christ Malmqvist, J. 
Carlson, Waldemar Martyn, Leroy 
Chamberlin, B. C. Mi^rmussen, Carl E. 
Christensen, Budwig Mikkelsen, Peter 
I >anielsen. Hans H. Monterus, John 
Damdanl, Alesandro Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Dittmer, Otto Nass, Paddy 

Danielson, Gustav ..ilson, Daniel 
Nilson, -737 
Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Nileen, N. A. -734 
Neilsen, George 
Nilsen, Peter 
Neerheim, Th. P. 
Nordin, M. 
Neilsen, W. 



Dunwoodle, H. 
Dahlberg, J. 
Eliasson, Edward 
Ekeland, Sigurd 
Eggers, John 
Edelhagen, P. F. 
Krieson, Johan 
Folvig, J. A. 



Friedrikson. Andrew Nystrom, Ragnar 
Porstrom, Oskar Osterhais, R. 



Fernberg, Gustaf 
Garder, Oscar 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Goethebeur, Ch. 
Gallen, Paul 



Olsen, Guttorn 

Olsen, N. 

Olsen, Olaf 

Olson, W. -668 

Olsen, A. -759 



Gundersen, Andreas Oysteth, S. 



Gallen, K. 
Guerin, Be Port 
Gunmanreu., John 
Goff, Steve 
Griel, Bernhardt 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Georges, Angela 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Helman, J. G. 



Osterhuis, J. 
Paulsen. -606 
Petterson, Axel 
Petersen, Charley 
Paris, Walter 
Petersen, C. -721 
Pedersen, L. -1321 
Pettersen, K. E. -9M 
Pedersen, -8 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 
Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Bos Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Baundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



i Registered letter) Pettersen, 1943 
llaalemitter, Karl Pedersen, Alf 
Hilda!, Karl G 



Penney, Mathem 
Persson, J. L. -921 
Petersen, E. -101 
I'erson, A. -1192 
Polge, L. 
Perleny, Emil 
Porter, Chas. 
Piedvache. Emile 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street. 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO. 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



FOR FURNISHED CABINS 

GO TO 

ALEX. MUHLBERG 

370 3d STREET, bet. Centre and Mesa 

$1 per Week or $3 per Month and Up 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



Ilenning, Gustav 

Hansen. Harry 

Haker, Matt 

Hansen, Chas. E. 

Hollti, John W. 

Holman, George M. 

Hcesehe, Heinrich 

Haldorsen, Herman Pederson. John 

Ilohman, H. Perkins. D. H. 

Hansen, -1073 Pedersen, Jack 

Henriksen, Hans Rauen, W. 

Hansen, Hjalmar Runge. Heiiieh 

Hohman, Carl -1767 Reulund, Andrew 

Hansen, Christian Rheinhard, Wilhelm 

Hansen, F. Rush, Fred 

(Registered letter) Richardson, H. E. 

Hansen, -1*54 Rytha. M. O. 

Helms, W. (Reg. letter P. O.) 

(Registered letter) Runge, H. 

Henrides, G. Reay, Stephen A. 

Hinson, J. A. Rasmussen, R. 

Hansen, L. Rire, Patric B. 
Holmstrom, CharlesReynolds, Thomas 

Halvorsen, -595 Rash, H. 

Herman, Fred Renolds. August 

Hillsen, Halvor Smith, Aksel F. 

llen.lriksen. G. H. Schaffter, A. 



Hansen, Chr. F. 
Hudson, Mat 
Iversen, John 
(Package) 



tReg. letter P. O.) 
Scarborda, Mario 
Smith, Axel 
Sorensen. -1664 



Johannesen, Hans H.Singer, J. 
Johansen, Albert Samuelsen, Otto 
Johansen, F. W. Soto, Pedro 
Johansen, C. M. -159SSoderstrom, O. 
Jungjohan, John Sanders, Charles 



FRED SVENDSEN 

■ •» » » ■ 

UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



Johansson, Nils 
Jensen, P. -695 
Johansson, -1576 
Jensen, -734 
Johansen, G. 
Junker, Paul 
Johnson, John 



Stahn, M. 
Sorensen, Michael 
Svensson, Ture 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Scheel, Johannes 
Schmidt, F. 
Steen. Hans 



Johannesen, A. -1557 Schannon, H. C. 
Johansen, A. F. -1287Sverkesen. L. C. 
Jensen. H. -1311 Schulz, Chris 

Johansen, Theodor Schmidt, E. -1670 



Johnsen, -1281 
n, Chris 
Juhnke, William 
Johansen, 1364 



Selzer, M. 
Samrio, S. 
Svedstrup, E. 
Sverkesen, Lou 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, -906 Andersen, Gustaf 

Andersson. A. H. Aaquist, Thorvald 
Askerlund, Daniel O. Arnesen, Karl A. 

Anderson, S. Albertsen, Johannes 

Andersson, Adolf Andersen, P. -858 

Ardelean, J. Andersson, -1229 

Absolonsen, Ole M. Antonsen, Marius 



Johnsen, J. -1050 Svensson. Nicolaus 

Jenssen, J .Kristen Strandqvist, Louis 

Jnhanssen, Aug. F. Schatze, Otto 

Jensen. -734 Svendren, -1050 

Johnsen, Alf. Staff, Louis 

Johansson, Hjalmar Skugstad, Christian 

Jorgensen, Walter Salberg, Oskar 

Johansson, N. Aug. Tyrholm. Johan 



iohansen, -1462 
Johnsen, Gust. 
Jaansen, Hans 
Jensen, Peter 
Johansson, -1486 
Johansson, H. 
Jensen, -1412 
Johansen, 1287 
Jensen, P. 



Thompson, Stephen 
Tobiason, Johan 
Tingleman, E. 
Tillman, Andrew 
Tipp, Joseph 
Torgersen, R. 
Ulke. E. 

Underhill, Geo. A. 
Voreland, G. K. 



i I ti mistered letter) Williams, R. E. 
Jansson, K. G. Weiss, Charles 

Johansen, Carl Wahlers, W. 

Johanson, -1452 Wordehoff, Alfred 

nssen, A. -1557 Westin. J. A. 



Klingstrom, G. 
Kirstein John 
(Cruse, Ed. 
Klinthorn, Martin 
Karsberg, C. 
Kamp, G. H. 



Wilson. J. 
Washburn, Thomas 
Widos, Stefan 
Winseus, Peter 
Yetwel, Fred 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Pacific Coast Marine- 




The Oceanic liner Mariposa was towed into San 
Francisco on October 13, four days overdue from 
Papeete, owing to defective boiler tubes. An 
investigation is being held. 

The overdue ship H. Hackfield arrived at Hono- 
lulu recently. The H. Hackfield was 156 days on 
the voyage from Leith to Honolulu and was 
quoted for reinsurance at 8 per cent. 

The Swedish bark Medea, Captain Brusa, from 
Stettin, for San Francisco, with a cargo of cement, 
glassware and other merchandise arrived at the 
latter port on October 12, after a long passage of 
225 days. 

The steamer Nome City, Captain Hansen, which 
sailed from San Francisco on October 10, for Se- 
attle, broke her propeller when off Point Reyes 
on her passage up the Coast, and put back to San 
Francisco. The Nome City will go into dry dock 
for repairs. 

J. A. Kennedy, President of the Interisland 
Steam Navigation Company, is in San Francisco 
seeking to hasten the completion of the steamer 
Mauna Kea, the new steamer of the Interisland 
Company intended for the run between Honolulu 
and Hilo, T. H. 

L. M. Gilman and M. S. Railey, of the firm of 
Gilman & Railey, filed a libel in intervention for 
supplies against the barge Minette in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco on October 
16. The Minette was sold several days ago for 
$1025. The intervention is to collect $71 due for 
supplies. 

Nothing has been done with regard to appoint- 
ing a new manager for the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company to succeed W. E. Pearce, who re- 
cently resigned. President Ford of the company 
is proceeding overland to New York, and it is 
understood that nothing will be done in the matter 
until his return. 

A wireless message was received at San Fran- 
cisco on October 8 from the steamer President 
on the way from Seattle to Nome when the 
steamer was in latitude 53 degrees 55 minutes 
north latitude and 156 degrees west longitude, 
stating that all was well. The message was 
transmitted over a distance of 1100 miles. 

Captain Nopander of the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company's service, who brought the City of 
Puebla to San Francisco on her last passage from 
Seattle will take command of the Senator. The 
Senator will come out from the Risdon Iron 
Works about November 1. Captain J. J. Shea 
takes permanent command of the City of Puebla. 
A telegram from Seattle, received at San Fran- 
cisco on October 14, conveys the intelligence that 
the schooner Martha W. Tuft, which runs between 
Seattle and the Katalla River, was totally wrecked 
on the sand spit at the mouth of the river on the 
night of October 5 during a heavy storm. The 
crew were with difficulty rescued from the rig- 
ging. . 

A cablegram from Auckland, N. Z., received at 
San Francisco on October 16 conveys the infor- 
mation that the British steamer Bucanteur, bound 
from Vancouver to Auckland, which was pre- 
viously reported ashore on Suva reef, and floated 
after sustaining considerable damage, will be de- 
tained for another ten days for further repairs. 
The repairs will cost $3100. 

A libel suit was filed in the United States Dis- 
trict Court at San Francisco on October 12 by 
William Denman, attorney for Mohns-Frese Com- 
mercial Company, against the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company to recover $1877 for damages to 
six cases of dry goods and a case of calfskin 
gloves. The goods were on the Acapulco when 
she sank at the Mail Dock last August. 

The sealing schooner Kinsci Maru has returned 
to Victoria, B. C, from the Alaska coast and 
Behring Sea with 744 skins. She reports that the 
other Japanese schooners in the Behring Sea will 
average from 100 to 300 skins. On September 6 
the schooner experienced submarine earthquakes 
for a period of twenty-four hours. One shock 
was so severe that it was feared the craft would 
go to pieces. 

The sailing of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany's steamer Mariposa, which broke down at 
sea through her tubes leaking and through taking 
insufficient oil to last for the round trip to Tahiti, 
has been postponed. As predicted, the Mariposa 
will have to lay up for repairs. She will go into 
drydock at San Francisco and be thoroughly over- 
hauled. The Mariposa will not resume the Tahiti 
run until November 22. 

With storms and succeeding dead calms con- 
spiring to create exasperating delays, the British 
bark Gulf Stream, Captain Kcrbyso, from Ant- 
werp, arrived at Port Townsend, Wash., on Oc- 
tober 14, 217 days out and with a record for the 
slowest passage made by any incoming ships from 



Europe to the Coast this year. The Gulf Stream 
carried a widely diversified general cargo, and 
after entering proceeded to Seattle as the first one 
of her many ports of discharge. 

The Norwegian ship Guiana, which has been 
out 210 days on her voyage from Mobile to Bahia 
Blanca, has been given up as lost. Until recently 
the Guiana was quoted on the overdue list at a 
premium of 90 per cent for reinsurance. She is a 
vessel of 1207 tons burden and was built in 1882 
at Nova Scotia. She recently was acquired by E. 
Rassmussen. On her present voyage she is com- 
manded by Captain S. Hcgge. The Guiana is 199 
feet in length, with a thirty-eight-foot beam and is 
twenty-two feet in depth. 

Caustic soda, blowpipes and scrubbing brushes 
have almost completed the work of thoroughly 
cleaning the raised steamer Acapulco at San 
Francisco. The painters have been at work in 
the parts of the Panama liner which have al- 
ready been prepared for them, and are engaged 
on the inside of the steamer. A very large staff 
of men is engaged on this work, and some parts 
of the vessel look better now than they did before 
she spent seventeen days under water in the mud 
at the old Mail Dock. 

Spreckels' new tug Restless, recently built at 
the Fulton Iron Works at San Francisco, was 
given her first taste of hard work on October 8, 
when she towed several large vessels up the Bay. 
Captain Olsen of the Restless states that the tug 
proved a very powerful puller and acquitted her- 
self in a satisfactory manner. The Restless is 
79 feet long 19 feet beam and 9 feet deep in the 
hold. Her engines are 250 horse-power and she 
is an oil burner. She promises to be the best tug 
of her class on the Bay. 

The Matson Navigation Company's new steamer 
will be launched on January 1 and will be com- 
pleted by April. She is to be called the Lurline 
and will be mainly used as a cargo carrier. There 
will be accommodations for fifteen passengers, 
and she will be fitted with a wireless telegraph 
system. The Lurline will be an oil burner and an 
oil carrier. The oil will circulate in an outer and 
separate compartment, and the general cargo will 
be carried in compartments by itself. The Lur- 
line will have a speed of fourteen knots. She is 
being built at Philadelphia. 

Captain F. Bergman, of the bark Sea King, has 
reported to Lieutenant Burnett of the Branch 
Hydrographic office that on September 4 in lati- 
tude 53 deg. 5 min. north, and longitude 164 deg. 
15 min. west, he sighted what was apparently a 
vessel bottom up, about thirty feet long on the 
water's edge, and round topped to a height of 
about ten feet. Captain Bergman passed about 
two miles to leeward of the derelict, the character 
of which it was impossible to make out, owing to 
drizzling rain and a strong northeast wind. This 
is dangerous to navigation. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on October 18: La Tour 
d'Auvergne, 139 days from Rochester for San 
Francisco, 8 per cent; Thomasina, 170 days from 
Fort Erie for Falmouth, 6 per cent; Silberhorn, 
128 days from Newcastle, Australia, for Pisagua, 
60 per cent; Louise, 131 days from Bremen for 
San Francisco, 11 per cent; Arthur Sewall, 199 
days from Philadelphia for Seattle, 21 per cent; 
Adolph Olrig, 192 days from New York for San 
Francisco, 15 per cent; Glenogil, 155 days from 
Liverpool for San Diego, 10 per cent; Dirigo, 137 
days from Honolulu to Delaware Breakwater, 10 
per cent; Lauriston, 121 days from Tumbry Bay 
to Falmouth, 6 per cent. 

The Japanese steamer Tenyn Maru has just 
been launched from the famous Mitsubishi Dock- 
yard and Engine Works at Nagasaki, where a 
number of Japan's largest men-of-war were built. 
The Tenyo Maru will be added to the Japan-San 
Francisco run by the Toyo Kiscn Kaisha, which 
already has in regular service the Japan Maru and 
the America Maru, passenger boats, each of 6000 
tons displacement. The new steamship is of 13,- 
500 tons displacement, or more than twice that of 
the present Japanese liners. Loaded to the twen- 
ty-eight-foot mark, she will displace 18,700 tons. 
She is 570 feet 9 inches long, 63 feet wide and 46 
feet 6 inches deep. She has accommodations for 
273 first-class passengers, 54 second-class passen- 
gers, and 800 steerage passengers, or a total of 
1127 people, and she has a cargo capacity of 8000 
tons. She is to have Parsons turbine engines, 
three propellers, thirteen cylindrical boilers, and 
will burn fuel oil, instead of coal. The contract 
calls for a speed of twenty knots. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards, 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1V-.A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377 A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union St». 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 

— s JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR, Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Mgr. 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, t>y mail, - $2.00 | Six months. 



{1.00 



Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 

- matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
44-46 East street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief. legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1907. 



THE LIMIT IN INJUNCTIONS. 



In this issue we reprint in full the decision 
of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, 
at San Francisco, in the Hammond injunction 
case. As previously announced in these col- 
umns, the case will be carried to the United 
States Supreme Court, in order that the prin- 
ciple involved may be definitely determined. 
That principle, in the view of the courts, may 
be described by the words, "Labor is prop- 
erty. *' In the view of labor, the principle at 
stake is one of personal liberty. In other 
words, labor denies all "property right" on 
the part of the employer in either labor or 
patronage. As the Circuit Court of Appeals 
admits, in the Hammond decision, the princi- 
ple involved in "Government by Injunction" 
lias not yet been passed upon by the court of 
last resort. It is the intention, therefore, of 
the organized seamen to put the matter to the 
supreme test. A favorable decision from the 
United States Supreme Court — that is, a de- 
cision favorable to the principle of personal 
liberty — will go far to remedy the abuse of 
the injunction in labor disputes. On the other 
hand, an unfavorable decision will place the 
whole subject squarely before the people of 
the country, and thus pave the way for action 
of a legislative nature, in order that the 
powers assumed by the judiciary may be re- 
gained by the people. In either event the peo- 
ple stand to gain by an appeal to the highest 
tribunal in the land. 

In this connection two recent instances of 
the injunction may be cited as showing the 
extremes to which that instrument is being 
stretched upon the theory of "property rights 
in labor." The first of these instances oc- 
curred at Philadelphia, Pa., on the 7th inst, 
in connection with the movement of the Print- 
ing Pressmen to secure the Eight-Hour day. 
The local union of that craft being about to 
vote on the question of rescinding the agree- 
ment previously entered into for a nine-hour 
day, an injunction was applied for and 
granted, restraining the Pressmen's Union 
f n mi taking the vote in question ! Another 
instance, equally repugnant to the sense of 
personal liberty and even more direct in its 
bearing upon the question of "property rights 



in labor" is that of the Federal injunction re- 
cently issued against the Alabama Railroad 
Commission, at the request of the Louisville 
and Nashville Railroad. In this case the 
Court declared as follows: 

An employer has a property right in the serv- 
ices of the workmen in his business. The em- 
ployer can maintain an action against any one 
who entices his servant to leave him, or prevent 
the servant from working for his employer. This 
property right is protected by the sanction of our 
criminal laws also. 

This, of course, is the doctrine of slavery, 
revamped to conform to modern prejudices 
against that "peculiar institution." The views 
of the Alabama court are very much to the 
point, but, except in the terms used, no more 
so than tin ise expressed in the average deci- 
sion in injunction cases. In a word, the Ala- 
bama decision possesses the merit of saying 
just what it means. "The times are ripe, and 
rotten ripe, for change!" The organized sea- 
men of the United States, by appealing the 
decision in the Hammond case, will perform 
their share of the duty — the paramount duty 
— of the American people to reaffirm and re- 
vivify the principle of personal liberty, upon 
which rests the whole structure of free society. 



MORE CHINESE CREWS. 



Mobile (Ala.), Oct. 10. — Nearly all vessels in 
the Central American fruit trade will, it is said, 
in the next few weeks replace their Norwegian 
crews with Chinese. The Norwegian owners, it 
is said, have concluded that owing to the un- 
satisfactory labor of their countrymen, their un- 
reliability, intemperate habits and the increasing 
number of desertions, partly on account of inter- 
ference of boarding-house runners, they will no 
longer employ them. Each ship will probably 
sign thirty-five men, bringing the total number of 
Chinese to 1050. — Press Dispatch. 

At first blush the foregoing would indicate 
an extension of Chinese labor in the United 
States. Upon reflection, however, the result 
to be anticipated is of an opposite character. 
It is likely that the attempt to man the Nor- 
wegian fruiters with Chinese will cost more 
than it is worth. The "arguments" used in 
justification of the new move are of the stere- 
otyped variety, as witness the following, from 
the Xew Orleans Times-Democrat : 

What will make the change one of the biggest 
in local maritime methods, it is said, will be the 
adoption of this plan by the United Fruit Com- 
pany, which fleet numbers about forty in the New 
Orleans-Mobile to Central America trade. Of 
these about th'rty are owned by and commanded 
by Norwegians. Each ship will sign probably 
thirty-live men, bringing the total number of 
Celestials to 1050. There are several other lines 
out of this port in the Central American trade, 
whose vessels it is thought will also be affected 
by this nautical revolution set in motion bv Nor- 
wegian captains and owners. 

When all Central American steamers have 
substituted Chinese for Scandinavians, it is esti- 
mated thai over 1500 of the former will be at 
work on tropic-bound craft. 

Possibly the most advantageous feature of dis- 
placing the Norwegians will be the protection 
that ship captains will have against boarding- 
house runners. These labor hunters are paid 
by the sailors' lodging houses so much per head 
for every seaman they can inveigle into leaving 
his ship. Sailors thus secured are held by the 
lodging-house proprietor, who in turn furnishes 
the captains of vessels with men to fill all 
vacancies in their crews. The proprietors try to 
gather as many deserters as they are able and 
then use them as a means of traffic. They are 
sometimes able to make money both coming 
and going, charging the ship captains for getting 
seamen for them and assessing the sailors for 
providing them with work. 

This customary traffic in sailors will receive 
a setback when Chinese are signed by the Cen- 
tral American ships. When a Chinaman comes 
ashore in this port from one of the Carribean 
fruiters under the $500 bond given to the United 
States authorities by his employer, no runner 
will dare entice him to leave the vessel unless 
he cares to violate the Chinese Exclusion Act. 
Anv action toward this end by the agent of the 
sailor boarding-house will set the Immigration 
officials on his trail and he will be punished by 
the Government if any offense is proven. Al- 
though on shore the Chinese seaman, by virtue 
of the bond he is under, is in the eyes of the 
law not actually in this country. With this 



safeguard it is thought that Central American 
vessels will not suffer the delay in getting avray 
from port now so common. 

The desire of the Norwegian shipmasters 
for protection from the boarding-house run- 
ners is natural, but the form of protection pro- 
posed is likely to carry with it inconveniences 
that will more than offset any advantages to 
be derived therefrom. 

In substituting the cheap and servile Chi- 
nese for the cheap and "intemperate" Norwe- 
gian, the shipmasters and shipowners are like- 
ly to find that they have jumped from the 
frying-pan into the fire. Anyway, the plan 
involves governmental supervision that is cer- 
tain to prove costly, if not actually prohibitive, 
as may be gathered from the following: 

The Department of Commerce and Labor is in- 
vestigating a report that owners of Norwegian 
steamships engaged in the Central American fruit 
trade intend to replace their Norwegian crews 
with Chinamen. Should such a plan be carried 
out it is believed the Government will view it 
with disfavor, as it might mean a wholesale at- 
tempt to land Chinese illegally in the United 
States. 

It is estimated that of all the fruit-carrying 
steamships engaged in the Central American 
trade more than 80 per cent of these vessels are 
chartered from Norwegian owners. These own- 
ers desire to supplant their countrymen with 
Chinamen, owing to their alleged intemperate 
habits and the increasing number of desertions, 
partly on account of interference of boarding- 
house runners. As each Norwegian steamship 
will sign about 35 men, it would bring the total 
number of Chinese to 1050. 

The whole case may be summed up by say- 
ing that the evils of "intemperance and de- 
sertion," from which the Norwegian ship- 
owner claims to suffer, are in the last analysis 
the result of low wages and a low standard 
of living generally. So long as the Norwe- 
gian shipowner attempts to run his vessels 
with "home" crews under "home" conditions, 
he must reconcile himself to the interference 
of the crimps. The employment of Chinese 
crews, so far from remedying that condition, 
will aggravate it by adding an element of in- 
terference on the part of the Government and 
public. 



We are in receipt of a communication, 
under date of September 26, from the long- 
shoremen of Katalla, Kayak district, Alaska, 
announcing that the men employed by the 
Katalla Company have been on strike since 
September 16 for an increase of wages. The 
men were receiving 50 cents per hour, day- 
time, and 75 cents per hour, nighttime, and 
now demand 75 cents and $1, respectively; 
also an increase from 50 to 75 cents per hour, 
straight time, for the beach gang. The men 
on strike have secured employment at other 
work, and the Company is completely tied up. 
Seamen and all other classes of labor are re- 
quested to stay away from Katalla until the 
strike is settled. 



The call for the twelfth annual convention 
of the International Seamen's Union of 
America, published on page 7 of this issue, 
announces the near approach of an event of 
the highest importance to the seafaring craft. 
The advice of Secretary-Treasurer Frazier, 
that the local affiliated unions should "select 
their very best men," is right to the point, and 
should be followed. The Seamen's conven- 
tions are working bodies, not talkfests or mu- 
tual-admiration gatherings. Only men who 
have demonstrated their capacity for honest 
and tireless work should be elected to the con- 
vention. 






The Telegraphers' strike is still on ! Help 
the keymen to win the recognition of their 
just demands by contributing to their support. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SEAMEN'S CONVENTION. 



Boston, Mass., October 10, 1907. 
To All Affiliated Unions, International Sea- 
men's Union of America, greeting: 

In pursuance of Article III, Section 1, of 
the Constitution of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, you are hereby 
notified that the Twelfth Annual Conven- 
tion of the International Seamen's Union of 
America, will be called to order in the port 
of Chicago, 111., December 2, 1907, at 10 a. 
m., and will continue from day to day until 
the business of the convention is com- 
pleted. 

"Representation at the Convention shall 
be based upon the average per capita tax 
paid during the year. Organizations shall 
be entitled to one delegate for two hundred 
members or more, three delegates for five 
hundred or more, and one delegate for each 
additional five hundred or majority fraction 
thereof." Sec. 2, Art. III. 

"Delegates shall have the same qualifica- 
tions as elective officers of the organizations 
represented and shall be elected by a gen- 
eral vote of each organization. Provided, 
that no one shall be seated as a delegate to 
the Convention who is delinquent in or who 
has been expelled by any affiliated Union ; 
nor shall anyone be qualified to act as a 
delegate who is also a member of any labor 
organization not affiliated with the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America. In case 
a vacancy occurs in the regularly elected 
delegation, between the election of delegates 
and the Convention, the various organiza- 
tions shall have the power to fill such vacan- 
cies." Sec. 4, Art. III. 

Organizations to be entitled to representa- 
tion must have their per capita tax paid for 
September. 

"All affiliated unions shall send at least 
one delegate to the Convention." Sec. 7, 
Art. III. 

As this will undoubtedly be one of the 
most important, as well as one of the most 
instructive conventions of the International 
Seamen's Union, I would urge upon all af- 
filiated unions to send as large a delegation 
as possible, and I would also urge upon all 
unions to select their very best men to rep- 
resent them, as the whole future of this 
movement for the betterment of the seamen 
of this country may depend upon the judg- 
ment of your representatives in dealing with 
the subjects that will be brought before 
them. Do not let friendship and favor stand 
in the way of sending your most represent- 
ative members as delegates to the Twelfth 
Annual Convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America. 

Hotel accommodations will be arranged 
for by the representatives of the Lake Sea- 
men's unions. 

Yours fraternally, 

Wm. H. Frazier, 
Secretary-Treasurer, International Seamen's 

Union of America. 



THE HAMMOND INJUNCTION. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



deprecated by the officers and leaders of the 
unions, but that fact does not relieve the appel- 
lants of responsibility nor render the court pow- 
erless to deal with them in their collective capac- 
ity for the violent acts which in the present case 
are shown to have been committed, and which, 
according to the affidavits, were threatened to be 
continued. 

It is contended that the Court erred in issuing 
the injunction for the reason that the appellee had 
no property right in that in which the Court 
protected it, and it is argued that while the ap- 
pellee had a property right in its vessels it had 
none in the labor of its employes, as the latter 
could leave its employment as they saw fit. To 
sustain that contention, Northern Pacific R. R. 
Co. vs. Whalen, 149 U. S., 157, is cited. In that 
case the Court held that the only ground on 



which, independently of an expressed statute, a 
court of equity would grant an injunction in a 
private action for nuisance, is special injury to 
property. The Court said: "No employer has 
such a property in his workman, or in their serv- 
ices, that he can, under the ordinary jurisdiction 
of a court of chancery, maintain a suit as for a 
nuisance, against the keeper of a house at which 
they voluntarily buy intoxicating liquors, and 
thereby get so drunk as to be unfit for work." 
This language of the opinion is especially relied 
upon, but the distinction between that case and 
the case at bar is elsewhere clearly stated in the 
opinion where the Court pointed to the fact that 
the defendant had not conspired or intended to 
injure the plaintiff's property or business, or to 
prevent the plaintiff's workmen from performing 
their contracts of service. The bill in the case at 
bar alleges, and the affidavits prove, that the ap- 
pellants had conspired to injure and destroy the 
appellee's business and to prevent its workmen 
from performing their contracts of service. The 
appellee's property is not only its vessels but 
the business of carrying freight and passengers, 
without which the vessels would lose their value. 
The right to operate vessels and to conduct busi- 
ness is as much property as are the vessels them- 
selves. All the rights which are incident to the 
use, enjoyment and disposition of tangible things 
are property. "Property is everything that has 
an exchangeable value." (Mr. Justice Swain in 
the Slaughterhouse Cases, 16 Wall., 127.) "Prop- 
erty may be destroyed or its value may be anni- 
hilated. It is owned and kept for some useful 
purpose and it has no value unless it can be used." 
In re Jacobs, 98 N. Y., 15. 

But it is said that the injunction goes further 
than the law permits in that by its language it 
prohibits the appellants from doing that which 
they have the lawful right to do. By the order 
of the Court the appellants are enjoined "from 
in any wise interfering with the crews, firemen, 
cooks, stewards, seamen, or either of them or 
any of the servants or employes of the said 
steam-schooners or steamship, or either or any 
of them, without due process of law. . . . From 
in any wise interfering with the business of the 
said steam-schooners and said steamship except 
by due process of law, with the business of the 
complainant or orator of and concerning the said 
steam-schooners and the said steamship. 
And from in anywise conspiring, colluding or con- 
federating together for the purpose of preventing 
the said steam-schooners and steamship from re- 
ceiving and discharging freight and passengers." 
It is said that under this injunction the appellants 
would be in contempt if they asked one of their 
relatives not to go as a passenger on one of the 
appellee's steamers, or if they made complaint of 
the violation of navigation laws by the appellee's 
vessels, or if they exercised their right to discrim- 
inate against the appellee by shipping cargo on 
other vessels than those of the appellee. The 
language of the injunction, however, is to be 
interpreted in the light of the allegations and 
prayer of the bill, and these may make an other- 
wise indefinite order sufficiently specific. Hamil- 
ton vs. State, 32 Md., 348. It is the acts set forth 
in the bill that the appellants are enjoined from 
doing. 

It is urged that there is no showing that the 
alleged damage is irreparable, but that on the 
contrary the showing is that if the appellee was 
suffering any damage for which the appellants 
were liable, it was easy of estimation, and could 
have been recovered in a single action against any 
of the appellants, who are abundantly able to re- 
spond in damages. It is true that the answer to 
the bill alleges that the appellants are not in- 
solvent, and that they possess $150,000 in cash in 
banks. But it may be said in general that ground 
is presented for injunctive relief whenever there is 
actual or threatened injury to property, coupled 
with facts bringing the case within one of the 
recognized grounds of equitable jurisdiction, and 
showing that there is no plain, adequate, or com- 
plete remedy at law. Said the Court in Walla 
Walla City vs. Walla Walla Water Co., 172 U. S. 
1: "The remedy at law, in order to exclude a 
concurrent remedy at equity, must be as complete, 
as practical and as sufficient to the ends of jus- 
tice and its prompt administration as the remedy 
in equity." One ground of equitable jurisdiction 
in cases of continuing trespass is the fact that the 
measure of damages is exceedingly difficult of as- 
certainment. In such a case the solvency or in- 
solvency of the wrongdoer is an immaterial fact. 
Kellog vs. King, 114 Gal., 375. And relief by 
injunction may be invoked as a remedy for the 
destruction of one's business if in such a case no 
action at law would afford as complete, prompt 
and efficient a remedy. North vs. Peters, 148 U. 
S., 271; Watson vs.Southerland, 5 Wall., 74. It 
is made sufficiently clear by the allegations of the 
bills and the facts proven, that, notwithstanding 
that the appellants may possess $150,000, the rem- 
edy at law is not as complete, prompt and ade- 
quate as the remedy in equity. The remedy at 
law would involve a multitude of suits and delay, 
pending which the injury to the appellee's busi- 
ness may proceed to ultimate destruction. The 
question of withholding or granting the injunc- 
tion was one which rested in the sound discretion 
of the Circuit Court. We find no ground for say- 
ing that there was abuse of that discretion. 

The order is affirmed. 

Opinion filed: Oct. 7, 1907. 

Indorsed: 

F. D. MONKTON, Clerk. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 21, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Chas. F. Hammarin presiding. Sec- 
retary reported shipping dull. The election of 
delegates to the convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America will take place at 
the next regular meetings held at Headquarters 
and Branches on October 28. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping improved; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping and pros- 
pects fair. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping medium. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain; men scarce. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 7, 1907. 
Shipping medium. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 17, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. The 
amendment to Article X, Section 2 was declared 
lost. The report of the Quarterly Finance Com- 
mittee, finding stubs, books, money on hand and 
in bank correct, was adopted as read. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 10, 1907. 
Shipping slack; nominated delegates to the con- 
/cntion of the International Seamen's Union. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 10, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping very good. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping slack. 

WM. PENJE, Secretary. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 7, 1907. 
Situation fair. 

R. H. WALKER, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 15, 1907. 
Shipping slack; prospects better. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
V/ 2 A Lewis St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 
Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1907. 
Situation medium. 

DANIEL SULLIVAN, Secretary. 
15 Union St. 

DIED. 

Emil Johnson, No. 1804, a native of SwcN n, 
aged 32, drowned in San Francisco Bay on Octo- 
ber o, 1907. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



•^^* 




ON THE GREAT LAKES 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




*^^* 



LOSS OF THE CYPRESS. 



WRECKS OF THE SEASON. 



The new steel steamer Cypress, owned by 
the Lackawana Steamship Company, was 
lost in the gale on Lake Superior on < >ctober 
il. The only survivor, so far as is known 
at this writing, was C. J. Pit/., second mate. 

The known dead are: I'\ B. Iluyck. mas- 
ter, of Sheridan, Xew York; John Smith, 
first mate; J. J. Norcross, chief engineer; 
\Y. F. Smith, assistant engineer; William 
Dundon, steward: Mrs. Wm, Dundon, as- 
sistant steward ; George Thorne, watchman ; 
George Dwelle, wheelsman, and Joseph Ray, 
oiler. 

The missing, according to the last trip 
sheet, are: C. Anderson, wheelsman; C. 
Ruttenberg, watchman ; William Chambers, 
oiler; Firemen Leon Wagner, Robt Luboig 
and L. Spencer; Ordinary Seamen Henry 
Mertle, Frank Eisenbach, Barney Pillion, 
George Johnson, E. Emerson, Wm. Hutch- 
ings and Porter. C. Laddie. 

I do not think that the latter list is cor- 
rect, as Comrade Shannon says he saw B. 
Pillion ("Red Barney") in Ashtabula a few 
days ago. If the verbal agreement between 
the Lake Carriers' Association and your 
delegates had been carried out, and a list of 
names of the crew left ashore before the 
Cypress sailed, we would be certain of the 
names of the comrades whom we have lost 
in this terrible disaster. 

The Cypress went down in from 300 to 
500 feet of water, between Keweenan and 
White Fish, not far from the place where 
the Western Reserve was lost, in 1892, and, 
like the Cypress, the only survivor was a 
mate. The Cypress was built at the Lorain 
yards of the American Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, by scab labor during the shipyards 
strike. She was 440 feet over all, 420 feet 
keel, 52 feet beam and 28 feet deep. She 
was launched on September 17 and left 
Lorain on September 21 and delivered her 
first cargo to Fairport, where she shipped 
her ill-fated crew. I was surprised to-day 
when informed by a gentleman who wit- 
nessed the building of the Cypress, that 
when the scabs were building her, if they 
could not get a rivet to drive properly they 
would fill up with candle and red paint; he 
says the LeGrand S. DeGraff was built the 
same way. This is not meant for a criti- 
cism of the owners, who could not possibly 
have known of the slovenly work on the 
vessel, but the men who did it should be 
hanged. 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



The new steamer Verona was launched at 
Lorain, on October 5. A dispatch from Lo- 
rain says that the Verona is the fourth of 
the Lackawanna fleet to be launched at that 
port. She will be ready in four weeks, 
and will enter the ore trade. The steamer is 
500 feet long, 52 feet beam and has a depth 
of 31 feet. She is fitted with Scotch boilers 
and triple-expansion engines. The Verona 
will go out under command of Captain 
Jackson. Who the chief engineer and mate 
will be has not been decided. The Verona 
is a sister-ship to the Odanah, Crete and 
Cypress. 



The Great Lakes up to and including 
October 7 from the opening of navigation 
this year claimed a toll of 100 lives from the 
ranks of those who earn their living on 
and by the boats. At the same time the 
owners have been hit for a total loss of 
$1,500,000 by the elements, "mistakes" of 
navigators and other accidents. The De- 
troit Journal says : 

The chief item in the monetary losses is 
that caused by fire, the steamers Naomi and 
City of Cleveland going far toward bring- 
ing up the grand total for destruction 
through this cause of $1,003,000. Loss of 
life on account of the fire was also consider- 
able, ten meeting their deaths on this ac- 
count. The Naomi again is responsible for 
the big total, seven of her crew and 
passengers meeting their deaths in the fire 
which destroyed the ship. The loss of the 
Arcadia off Pentwater on April 23i is by far 
the greatest accident of the season, four- 
teen people — every person aboard the little 
boat — meeting death in the Lake when she 
went down. 

On the whole the season averages about 
the same as last, and the losses have been 
much lighter than in 1905, when the fall 
brought terrible wrecks. That the losses 
have not been heavier is in a great measure 
due to the good work of the Life Savers 
who have saved many a boat which by not 
many a year ago it would have been thought 
useless to try for. The wrecker Favorite 
is one of the latest acquisitions to the prop- 
erty saving fleet. 



CANADIAN PACIFIC LINERS. 



The Buffalo Drydock Company has se- 
cured the contract for putting together the 
two big Canadian Pacific steamers which 
will be towed to that port from Quebec in 
sections. The steamers, which were built 
abroad, will be operated on the Upper Lakes 
by the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

The steamer Assiniboia, the first ship to 
come over, has been cut in two at Quebec, 
105 feet being taken off her bow. Edward 
N. Smith, superintendent of the Buffalo 
Drydock Company was at Quebec when the 
operation was performed and he will have 
charge of the work of joining the sections. 

The steamer Keewatin, which is a sister- 
ship to the Assiniboia, arrived at Montreal 
recently with 1,000 tons of cargo. The Kee- 
watin will go to Quebec, where about one- 
third of the forward portion will be cut off 
and the two sections will be towed to Buf- 
falo. 



Comrade Alfred Lee - ordinary-seaman, 
No. 13729, fell into the cargo hold of the 
steamer Sir William Fairbairn, at Conneaut 
on October 12, and died of his injuries in 
the General Hospital on the same day. The 
unfortunate comrade was not entitled to 
benefit, but the Pittsburg Steamship Com- 
pany, which owns the Fairbairn, very 
promptly assumed all financial responsi- 
bility, and sent the dead comrade's body to 
his relatives at Perth, Canada. 



BIG STRIPPING JOB. 



The Oliver Iron Mining Company has 
placed an order for 125 seven-yard stripping 
cars t<> be employed on the work of strip- 
ping the Hull division of the Hull-Rust 
property at Nibbing. The cars, it is ex- 
pected, will be delivered in time for the com- 
pany to put them in commission on or be- 
fore the first of the new year. The Hull- 
Rust mine will be a might open pit proposi- 
tion. The Hull and Rust are treated as one 
property. 

The work of stripping the Hull will begin 
when the new order for tripping cars is filled, 
at a point half a mile east of the Rust open 
pit, and in time this and the Rust pits will 
be connected. The combined open pits will 
make the Hull-Rust the greatest mine of the 
kind in the world. 

The work of stripping at the Hull-Rust 
has already caused the removal of over 
3,000,000 cubic yards of material, and it is 
estimated that before the work is fully com- 
pleted the total of overburden removed will 
have been fully 10,000,000 cubic yards. 

The Mahoning people have awarded a 
contract to Drake & Stratton to strip one of 
their properties south of the present Mohon- 
ing open pit, at a point that includes the 
former site of the Great Northern depot at 
Mahoning. The Hull-Rust open pit will ex- 
tend between the two open pits of the Ma- 
honing Company. 



BRIDGE AT ASHTABULA. 



Following the notice issued recently that 
the old case against the commissioners of 
Ashtabula county, regarding the swing 
bridge at Ashtabula harbor, had been can- 
celled, Mayor R. H. Pfaff and the commis- 
sioners have received formal notification 
from Major C. McD. Townsend, Govern- 
ment engineer for this district, that the Sec- 
retary of War had decided that the bridge in 
question was an "unreasonable obstruction 
to navigation," and must be removed before 
October 22, 1908. Anent the proposition, 
the Mayor and commissioners were notified 
that a hearing in the case would be held at 
the Harbor City Hall in Ashtabula on Oc- 
tober 22, 1907, at which anything they may 
have to offer on the subject may be sub- 
mitted. 

The notice specifies that "insufficient 
width of span, a faulty position of the navig- 
able opening and the existence of the center 
pier and its fender in the river," make navi- 
gation difficult and that it is proposed to re- 
quire the following changes be made in said 
bridge : 

"So alter said bridge as to afford a clear, 
navigable opening not less than 140 feet be- 
tween the fenders and remove the present 
center pier and its fender to a depth of 
twenty-one feet below the mean Lake level." 



The Baltimore & Ohio will in a few weeks 
begin the construction of a new coal dump 
at Lorain, O., to take the place of the pres- 
ent No. 2 dump. It will be patterned after 
the machines at Ashtabula and Conneaut, 
with greater capacity than the present 
dump. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



It is expected that the steamer Monroe, 
building at the Ecorse yard for the Frontier 
Steamship Company will be launched 
shortly. She will carry 10,000 tons. 



During the month of September, 872,757 
tons of coal were received at Conneaut, an 
increase of 96,043 tons over the correspond- 
ing period last year. To date the total re- 
ceipts at this port are 4,178,389 tons. 



Wrecking operations on the steamer 
Packard, sunk in Pigeon Bay, Lake Erie, 
have been discontinued for the present, ow- 
ing to bad weather conditions. Nothing 
more will be done toward raising the wreck 
until next season. 



They lost their clothes and all their be- 



longing; s. 



The 400-foot steamer ordered by W. H. 
Becker recently will be named for John 
A. Donaldson, the well-known coal shipper. 
The new boat, which will be built by the 
American Shipbuilding Company will come 
out next spring. 



H. D. Edwards & Co., of Detroit, have 
filed a libel of $81.20 on the coal carrying 
steamer Saginaw, for equipment said to 
have been furnished the vessel. The Sagi- 
naw is owned by the Black Diamond Tran- 
sit Company, of Detroit. 



The new steel steamer Arthur Hawgood, 
which is under course of construction at the 
Bay City yards of the American Ship Build- 
ing Company, was launched on October 5. 
The Hawgood is 569 feet over all, 56 feet 
beam and 31 feet molded depth. She is being 
built for the Hawgood Brothers, of Cleve- 
land, and will be commanded by Captain 
T. H. Sackett, of Marine City. 



A dispatch from Two Harbors says that 
the City Council of that place has ordered 
a special election to vote on a proposed bond 
issue, the money to be used to improve the 
inner harbor. The Government appropriated 
$100,000, the city agreeing to furnish the 
necessary funds to do the work in the inner 
harbor. The plans as agreed upon call for 
a stilling basin, and also a turning basin 
in the west of Two Rivers. 



Despite the defense set up for the Life- 
Savers at Crisp's Station, the survivors of 
the Nimick feel bitterly over the failure of 
the surfmen to go to the assistance of the 
sinking ship. The fact that the engineer 
could swim ashore, and that the boat that 
was successfully launched off the Nimick 
managed to get ashore, is advanced as an 
argument why the Life-Savers with their 
self-righting lifeboat could have reached the 
wreck if anything like a courageous effort 
had been made. 



The tug Excelsior, of the Great Lakes 
Towing Company, while going up the river 
was struck when opposite Amherstburg by 
the steamer Presque Isle, owned by the 
Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company, and sent to 
the bottom. Five of the crew of the tug 
jumped into the water, and the fireman, who 
was below, managed to get to the surface 
before the tug sank. The men proved to be 
good swimmers, and managed to keep afloat 
until they were picked up by another tug. 



The United States Lake Survey is in- 
formed that the wreck of the steamer Se- 
vona, which has been lying sunk for two 
years on a rock reef about 1 5-8 miles E. by 
N. of Sand Island light, Apostle Islands, 
Lake Superior, will be removed. The Reid 
Wrecking Company now owns the sunken 
vessel and will undertake the removal oper- 
ations as soon as the weather permits. Cap- 
tain James Reid, of the wrecking company, 
states that the boiler and machinery will 
first be removed, then the cargo of iron 
ore, and afterward the hull will be either 
raised entire or blown to pieces for the 
scrap. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 
ville. 



William Smith is requested to write to 
his sister, Mrs. Lot. Beeks, at Mannsville, 
N. Y. Important! 



We Don't Patronize. 



John Murphy would like to hear from 
his brother, Dan Murphy, now on the Pa- 
cific Coast. Address John Murphy, 1244 
Main street, Cleveland. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y '...: 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT„ CANADA.... Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, O. 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
I Milnth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay. Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, M!ch. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay. Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars— Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
theim & Schiffer, of New York City; Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Flour — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Valley City Milling Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

Whiskey — Finch Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 
Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. ; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Henry H. Roa- 

lof & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt. Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y.; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printing — Hudson, Kimberley & Co., printers, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond, Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, 111.; Corning Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement — Portland Peninsular Cement Company, Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Baily & Co., Am- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Brown & Sharpe Tool 
Company, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden. N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville, 111.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company), Rutland. Vt.; Erie City Iron 
Works, Erie, Pa.; Singer Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.; Pittsburg Expanded Metal Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa.; American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul. 
Minn.; Standard Sewing Machine Company, Cleve 
land, Ohio; Manitowoc Dry Dock Company, Manito 
woe, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo.; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; Home Stove 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, Circle- 
ville, Ohio; Merkle- Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumbei — Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash.; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolis, 
Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Raymondsville, N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper — William Bailey & Sons, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany, Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth — Thos. E. Gleeson, East Newark, N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Bill Posters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co., and New York Bill Posting Co., New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddington Hotel, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Thomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BRITISH POSTAL SERVICE. 



( )f interest to the Postoffice Department, 
civil service and American wage earners in 
general is the report of a select committee 
which for over a year past has been inquir- 
ing into the condition of the postal employes 
in Great Britain. The report has been laid 
before the House of Commons, and its rec- 
ommendations are likely to be adopted. A 
resume of the report, forwarded by Con- 
sul-General R. J- Wynne of London, is as 
follows : 

A careful analysis of the various recom- 
mendations of the committee leads to the 
conclusion that their acceptance will in- 
volve an ultimate annual cost to the nation 
approaching $2,500,000, although the in- 
crease per individual may appear small. A 
demand on the part of the organized carriers, 
clerks, telegraphers and telephonists for a 
forty-two-hour week has been rejected, while 
a weekly half holiday is only recommended 
where the exigencies of the services permit. 
Free medical attendance or a small money 
grant given where the official doctors are 
not easy of access is to be allowed. 

The London telegraphists, who now rise 
to a maximum of $15.50 weekly, asked to go 
up to $24 weekly. The committee recom- 
mended that their maximums should be 
$16.25, with an excess allowance of 75 cents 
a week till promoted for passing a search- 
ing examination in technical telegraphy. The 
London sorters, who now receive $15.50, 
claimed much the same scale as the teleg- 
raphists, but they are not recommended for 
any increase in their maximums, which the 
committee considers adequate. The maxi- 
mum salaries of the London postmen at 
present vary from $7 to $8.50 a week. The 
committee, dividing the London area into 
three districts, recommended new maxima 
of $7.75, $8.25 and $8.75. 

The provincial postal and telegraph serv- 
ants made large claims, in many cases ask- 
ing that the maximum salary should be 
nearly double, but the increases actually 
recommended are not very great, though the 
lowest-paid offices are recommended for con- 
siderable advances. The telegraphists and 
sorting clerks at these offices, the commit- 
tee suggested, should be graded into five 
scales (instead of seven) with maximum sal- 
aries of $10, $11, $12, $13 and $14, respec- 
tively. The provincial postmen, they urge, 
should be graded into five grades, with 
maximum wages of $5.25, $5.75, $6.25, $6.75 
and $7.50 respectively. A long list of alter- 
ations is suggested in the wages of other 
classes of postal servants. Women sorters, 
for instance, are recommended for a more 
rapid advance to the maximum of $7.50, and 
women telegraphists to a maximum of $10. 
An important change suggested is that 
women of all grades in the service should 
be no longer exempt from Sunday duty. 

Most of the changes recommended in 
wages are more in the nature of redistribu- 
tion on the rate of progression than actual 
increases. The maximum has been raised to 
those employed in the Central Telegraph 
Office to $16.25 a week. 

The committee proposed that it is not 
possible to abolish the system of Christmas 
boxes for postmen, and recommended no 
alteration, though it is an open secret that 
both the Postoffice and the men desire their 
abolition, the only question being as to the 
amount of the compensation which should 
be given. 



The committee recommended that night 
duty shall be reckoned from 8 p. m. to 6 a. 
m. (instead of 10 p. m. to 6 a. m.) and that 
seven hours during the night period should 
be counted equal to eight hours of day 
work. In spite of the alterations there will, 
however, be thousands of men in the serv- 
ice still receiving $3.75, $4 and $4.25 a 
week. 



FORTY-SEVEN-STORY STRUCTURE. 



The forty-seven-story Singer building on 
lower Broadway, New York, will be the 
tallest skyscraper in the world. With the 
cupola, which includes six stories, it will be 
742 feet high from basement to flagpole, 187 
feet taller than the Washington monument. 
From the sidewalk to the roof it will be 612 
feet. The building is now up to the for- 
tieth story and excites much interest even 
in New York, because of its great height. 

The tower for forty-one stories will be 
sixty-five feet square. The top six stories 
will be taken up by the cupola and a lan- 
tern. The main body of the building will be 
only fourteen stories high. The tower, 
when completed, will weigh 18,365 tons. 
This weight will rest on concrete caissons, 
sunk to bedrock, ninety feet below the level 
of the street. The excavation about these 
caissons was filled in from bedrock -up for 
thirty feet with solid concrete. There are 
thirty-six of these solid concrete caissons in- 
cased in steel, systematically arranged in an 
area approximating 9000 square feet. Upon 
them is placed a gridiron of steel girders, 
which modern engineering genius has ar- 
ranged in such a way that the enormous 
weight of the tower proper, having a ground 
area of 4200 square feet, is distributed with 
methodical evenness over a bearing surface 
so large that the rock foundation carries 
only the weight of a twenty-story building. 
The building itself is of the modern 
French school of architecture. The mater- 
ials of the facades are pressed brick and In- 
diana limestone. The power generated by 
the dynamos in the basement would be 
able to light a small city, and, indeed, there 
will be more lights in this one building than 
there are in some small cities. From the 
roof of the main building searchlights of 
the United States naval standard will be 
directed against three sides of the tower, 
making it visible at night for twenty miles. 
The lantern on the top of the tower will 
contain a powerful searchlight, which may 
be seen from a distance of sixty or seventy 
miles. On election nights it would be pos- 
sible by a code of light signals to flash the 
result over half of Long Island, far out into 
Xew Jersey and up the Hudson as far as 
Newburgh. Further illumination of the 
tower will be accomplished by concealed in- 
candescent lights. 



Argentina now seems fixed at the top of the 
list in exports of wheat to Great Britain. It 
has held that post for three years, with steadily 
increasing figures, while the British imports 
from every other country have either declined 
or fluctuated. The United States is second at 
present, having up to July 10 sent less wheat 
than last year, while Argentina's contribution 
has increased 20 per cent. 



FOUND. 

A silver case watch in the Sailors' Union Hall 
at San Francisco. Apply to Secretary. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. Wash., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE. Wash.. 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 
EtREKA, Cal., P. O. Box 327. 
SAX TEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T., 821 Alakea St.. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT"! E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: . 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO, CaJ., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Or., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. : 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street. Sydney, N. S. W. 






INFORMATION WANTED. 

A. G. Oberg, No. 744, a retired member of the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is inquired for Oy 
C. E. Roberts, 44-46 East street, San Francisco. 

F.dvvard Bodey, born in Brixton, near London, 
England, aged about 54, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Bror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derlmlts, Forsamlin, Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martell, a native of Finland, aged about 
47, last heard of on the Pacific Coast about IS 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg, Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago, is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing his present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Ferndale, Wash. 

Ivar Walter Lindblom, native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address, 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last beard from at San 
Francisco, 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis, Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years, 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 






HUSBANDS AS PRIZES. 



A Berlin tradesman has lately issued a 
circular promising to bestow a husband, in 
the person of his son, upon the spinster who 
shall, within a year's space, collect the most 
coupons, one of which is given with each 
purchase to the value of 5 marks. To the 
prize husband, as a wedding gift, he has 
promised to bestow a share in his business. 

This singular offer, though, of course, of 
rare occurrence in the commercial world, 
is not without precedent. Some years since 
a Leeds firm of drapers circulated among 
its customers penny tokens, whereon was 
depicted a stylishly dressed man surrounded 
by the legend, "A Husband for a Guinea," 
signifying that such as expended that 
amount on the firm's goods were allowed 
one chance in a raffle for an eligible young 
man, the junior partner in the house. 

A circular which a now defunct tea com- 
pany distributed among its lady canvassers 
contained the announcement that "the 
young lady who procures the best result 
compared with the amount of salary re- 
ceived, for not less than six months' service 
will receive £500 and be allowed to marry 
any single young gentleman of the firm. 
Should the young gentleman refuse to 
marry her we will pay the breach-of-promise 
damages, £100 extra, and dismiss the young 
gentleman from the firm." 

In the early years of our late Queen's 
reign the proprietor of a library at one of 
the leading Kentish watering places issued 
the announcement of a lottery for a hus- 
band, who was guaranteed to be in the -en- 
joyment of an annuity of not less than £200 
per annum. The event created quite a stir, as 
the prize was a handsome young fellow, 
who appeared to be in every way eligible. 
Great, then, was the dismay created by the 
arrival on the very day when the draw was 
advertised to take place of a couple of Lon- 
don constables, by whom the much-admired 
Adonis was arrested on a charge of fraud. 

Every New Year's day a large Viennese 
firm of bootmakers was wont to offer a hus- 
band to the lady whose foot was considered 
to be the smallest and most shapely of the 
year, guaranteeing at the same time to set 
the couple up in business should such help be 
needed. For over twenty years was this 
practice continued until the head of the 
firm, an old widower, fell in love with and 
himself married the Cinderella-footed lady, 
who, being of an ultrajealous disposition, 
sternly vetoed the custom's continuance. 

In the late eighties a Brussels tailor took 
a young man into his employ on the stipu- 
lation that he should be allowed to dis- 
pose of him in marriage. The agreement 
signed, the tailor made public announce- 
ment that he would bestow a husband upon 
that spinster or widow who should bring 
most custom to his establishment within 
twelve months. After a keen competition 
the prize was carried off by a buxon widow 
of 60, who, besides introducing her eight 
sons to the clothier's notice, was the means 
of inducing a score of brothers, cousins and 
nephews to patronize his shop. 

To all spinsters and widows a chance in 
the lottery for a husband was the induce- 
ment held out by a New York photographer 
to have their photographs taken at his es- 
tablishment, while to such ladies as were 
married, and therefore ineligible, it was 
permitted to nominate a friend in their 
stead. The circulars to this effect, which 



were distributed broadcast, were sur- 
mounted with a likeness of the prospective 
prize, a man of such attractive appearance 
that many matrimonially inclined women 
were induced to try their luck before the 
camera. 

After some months, during which trade 
prospered exceedingly, the draw took place 
and the good-looking young man was duly 
delivered over to a lady who, it subsequently 
transpired, was the photographer's own 
daughter, whose father had persuaded her 
to exploit, for the good of his business, her 
fiance of some three years' standing. The 
cunning trio soon afterward left New York. 
— London Tit-Bits. 



JAPAN HAS RACE PROBLEMS. 



It seems that Japan has been having a 
little race problem of her own. The details 
are sparingly given by a native press that 
courts consistency. From the sparse news 
accounts and the editorial comments of some 
of the Tokio papers, it appears that the im- 
portation of Chinese laborers to work on a 
new railroad line in Kagoshima province 
has helped to show the Japanese where the 
shoe pinches in San Francisco. 

Early in July the contractor to whom the 
construction work on the railroad had been 
awarded imported thirty Chinese laborers. 
The wages he paid were 10 yen a month — 
about $5 gold — and that was 50 per cent 
cheaper than the hire of Japanese laborers. 
Still the Chinese were satisfied, and they 
were good workmen. 

So pleased was the Japanese contractor 
with his experiment that he sent to China 
for 100 more, and before these coolies had 
landed at Nagasaki a third consignment of 
800 was contracted for with Chinese emigra- 
tion companies in Chefoo. 

The Mainichi Dempo naively states that 
the Japanese laborers took great alarm at 
the importation of the Chinese coolies, who 
were willing to work for half of what a 
Japanese laborer demanded. Mass meetings 
were held by the citizens of Kagoshima-ken 
"to consider this grave peril to the laborers 
of Japan," as the Mainichi puts it. 

But the sentiment of the outraged laborers 
of Kagoshima-ken did not stop at mass 
meetings. One night in the latter part of 
July they posted a notice written in Chinese 
on the doors of the Chinese laborers' huts 
that if they didn't stop working in Japanese 
men's places they would be driven back to 
China. 

The local police officials took alarm at the 
indignation of the citizens of Kagoshima- 
ken and sought advice from the central Gov- 
ernment at Tokio. Tokio, realizing the pos- 
sibilities of embarrassment in any overt 
act against the Chinese ordered the police of 
Kagoshima-ken to use their utmost powers 
to protect the foreigners in case of an out- 
break and then summoned the enterprising 
contractor to a conference in Tokio. 

It happens that an Imperial ordinance, No. 
352, which was promulgated in 1898, forbids 
the employment of foreign labor in Japan 
except under limited conditions, which re- 
strict such employment only to the old 
treaty ports where foreigners congregate. 
The latest papers from Japan have it that 
the contractor has either unconsciously dis- 
obeyed this law or that he intends to force a 
test case. — New York Sun. 



STATE AID FOR SHIPPING. 



If there is one fact that seems to have 
been taken for granted everywhere in con- 
nection with the new Cunard steamships 
Lusitania and Mauretania, it is that both 
these vessels have been made possible by 
the generous subsidies allowed by the Brit- 
ish Government. Not only was the credit 
of the Admiralty given the company for the 
enormous sums needed for the building of 
the ships, but they carry a yearly guarantee 
sufficient to meet the interest payment on 
the debt to the Nation which the company 
has assumed. At least this is the popular 
interpretation of the situation. Mr. Wat- 
son, chairman of the Cunard line, looks at 
the matter from a different viewpoint, and 
his position is interesting as illustrating one 
of the most common facts in mundane af- 
fairs, that perspective and standpoint may 
make obvious things appear other than they 
are. 

At a recent social function, at which Lord 
Brassey, in toasting the great British steam- 
ship company, took occasion to express his 
approval of the policy of the State aid for 
such splendid vessels as the two new tur- 
bine liners, the Cunard representative in- 
terposed a prompt disclaimer of the sub- 
sidy jdea. He declared specifically that the 
Cunard company "received no subsidy" and 
"asked for no assistance." The Government 
had wanted a certain article and had asked 
the company to provide it. This the com- 
pany considered, and the outcome was the 
existing agreement, which the Cunard line 
regards as nothing more than "payment for 
services rendered and to be rendered." Very 
much the same thing might be said for many 
forms under which State aid for shipping 
has been disguised, but at all events it is 
well to see the thing from all points of view. 

It has been the proud boast of the Ham- 
burg-American line, one of the chief of the 
German competitors of the Cunard, that 
it has no subsidy whatever, enjoys no priv- 
ileged position in Germany or elsewhere, 
and has no advantages at German ports 
which are not enjoyed by the steamships of 
any other line under whatever flag. The 
contrary has often been erroneously stated, 
and the Hamburg-American line is entitled 
to the credit that belongs to it for the en- 
terprise that has placed its ships on every 
sea. It has undoubtedly received the pow- 
erful patronage of the German Emperor as 
a great national undertaking in the line of 
the national aspirations and ambitions, and 
to this extent may be said to have received 
the "aid" of the State. But it has rendered 
no "service" to the Government for which it 
receives an annual payment of $750,000 
from the Imperial revenues. — Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. 



It is understood that the protracted competi- 
tion in freight cutting is at an end between the 
Straits Steamship Company and Beng Kee & 
Co. of Penang, an agreement having been ar- 
rived at between the parties which will termi- 
nate the disastrous policy detrimental to the 
owners and shareholders, though beneficial to 
traders, with ports on the west coast of the 
peninsula between Penang and Singapore. 



For union-label products consult the Jour- 
nal's ad columns. 



Demand the union label on all products ! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA. CAL. 



A general strike was proclaimed at 
Turin, Italy, on October 13 to begin 
on the 14th. 

At the end of 1906 there were 2790 
factories in New South Wales, employ- 
ing. 61,321 hands, and of these 19.142 
were female toilers. 

A strike recently occurred at 
Messrs. Vickers, Sons and Maxim, 
England, against the bonus system. 
The dispute was settled satisfactorily 
to the strikers. 

Recently the British Miners' Fed- 
eration cabled £1000 to the miners 
of the Rand, South Africa, to assist 
them in their light against the Trans- 
vaal mining companies. 

The Cutters and Trimmers' Union. 
of Sydney, Australia, is meeting with 
considerable success in the demand 
for better wages. Already a number 
of factories have conceded the reason- 
able rates asked for by the union. 

The Ipswich Colliery Owners' As- 
sociation has promised that it will 
meet a deputation of the Engine- 
drivers and Machinists' Association, 
to discuss an increase of wages for 
the members of the latter association. 
The committee appointed in Mel- 
bourne, Australia, some nine months 
ago to inquire into the apprenticeship 
question, unhesitatingly condemned 
the lax manner in which apprentices 
are being taught their trade in Aus 
tralia. 

That Old-Age pensions of not less 
than 5 shillings a week shall be paid 
as a civil right to all persons of 60 
years of age and upward is the de- 
mand of the Labor party as voiced at 
the Trade-Union Congress at Bath 
recently. 

Day and and night meetings of rail- 
way employes are being held in all 
parts of Great Britain, at which 
speeches are made and resolutions 
passed emphatically favoring a strike 
to force the rompanies to recognize 
the union. 

The lockout of the Sydney (Aus- 
tralia) coal lumpers has ended by mu- 
tual concessions, the unionists ob- 
taining an increase of lj^d. per hour 
all round. Foremen permanently em- 
ployed are not to be members of the 
union, but casual foremen may be. 

The men employed at the Barren 
Jack waterworks, in New South 
Wales, were allowed twenty minutes 
each day to enable them to reach the 
spot where they worked. Some over- 
officious person stopped the conces- 
sion, and so caused a strike of 350 
workmen. 

A law just promulgated at Rome, 
Italy, provides that railroad employes 
shall in future come under the same 
icgulations as employes ot the other 
departments of the Government. This 
«i'ill make railroad men who take part 
in strikes liable to punishment for 
misdemeanor. 

Mine-owners and miners at Kal- 
goorlie, West Australia, met in con- 
ference recently and agreed upon a 
statement of wages and conditions of 
labor for a stated period. The rates 
agreed upon have now to go before 
the miners' union for its ratification or 
otherwise. 

Work in all the factories at Milan, 
Italy, has ceased and traffic on the 
street railways was stopped as a re- 
sult of the general strike declared 
on October 11, due to the encounter 
between striking gas-workers and a 
body of strike-breakers, in which the 
carbineers interfered and fired on the 
mob. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Successor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots, Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe--$2.00 to $5.00-Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered and shipped 
to any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and [ron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKE, 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Lit- 
tle Beauty,' the "Princess" and 
other high gradeunion-madecigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not called or sent for. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA. CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

Union Label Goods. 

A. ROSENSTEIN, Prop. 

23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore: 

Phone Clay 685. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 

Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
1XION LABEL GO 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

i .ils exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Andersen, Frltzef Kruhming, a. 
Andersen, Geo. Chr. Lassen, Th. 



Andersson, A. 
Anns, Moritz 
Blasieh, Mike 
Bartels, Otto 
Bebrens, Emil 
Bjorkman. Chas. 
Bluhm, Peter 

Paul 
Bauwens. Edemon 



Llndstrom, Emil 

l..iis, n. F. -1113 
Lyche, Harris M. 
I .p. .It-man, A. 
Langvardt, Christian 
Lang, G. 
I.r I'Yviv, Louis. 
Lange, F. 

. Ilonore 



i.,iii\\> ii.-, i.'i' "i"" ■.■ - 

Benson, John T. -143Maack, Hans 



Bergh, EkVw 
Calson, Oscar 

I >. hi. John 
I talton, Tin, mas H 
i irena H. A. E. 
Briksen, E 
Ehlers, Henry 
Hiving. Gust 

thsen, Daniel Olson, Albert 
Eiiassen. O. E. Olson, Olaf 

Frost, Hans Olsen. Arthur G 

• Viektor B. Ordig, Bruno 
Griel, Bernberdt Patterson, John 



Matson, Viknor 

Marks, S. \V. 

Nelson, Chas. 
Nilsen, Edvin 
Nordstrom, Knut O 
Nurmi. E. W. -866 

Nurmlnen, J. V. 
Olsen, Andy -754 



Henricks, Go*s 
Hansen, Hans Ch. 
Herrmann, E. 

..hn 
i, llarrald 
Hansen. 11. 
Hansen, George 

Hanson. A 



Pettersen, Harold 
Pettersson, Gustaf E. 

-1018 
Petersen, E<1. 
Peterson, Mauritz 
Rask. C. H. 

Rasmassen, Adolph 
Rosbach, Walter 



isen, Martin Raetz, Aug 

f-Jartman, Karl Rosenvold, Isak 

[vers, John Russell, Ed. 

Jakobeen, r,ie Selander, Gus. 

Fohn st. oil', Louis 

Jans. n. Haral L. Bwanson, Ivar 

Johanncssen, Hans Smith, Max 

H. Smith. H. 

jar risen, flans Tyrholm, Johan 

on, Oscar Thomson, John 

Johansen, F. B. Tombeck, R. 

\. j. CJdd, John 

Kristoi'l oi'sen, Emil Vincent, Joseph 

hecht, Alt Wanous. Geo. A. 

Karlsson. A. M. Wilson, Anders 

Kaufold. E. W'altner, M. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

tlneorpora te.l \ 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH, 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton fiannel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Adams, Joseph 
Aga, Johan 
Akesson, H. 
Allendsen, H. 
Albers, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 
Amnell. A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
Anderson, H. M. 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Victor 
Anderson, L. T. -736 
Anderson, Hjalmar 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen. -1520 
A pps, P. 

Appelqulst, O. T. 
Arnesen. Martin 
Aspen, K. D. 
Austin. M. M. 
Bateman, S. J. 
Berg, Albert 
Bernard, S. 
Belin. Erik 
Bensen. F. 
Bernert. F. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bensen, J. E. 
Berg, H. M. 
Bee. Colin 
Berkelund, R. 
Bindseil. W. 
Billington, J. M. 
Bjornholm, H. 
Blecka, A. 
Blomberg. G. 
Botgereist, L. 
Boose. P. 
Bratrud. O. M. 
Braa. P. O. 
Brunstrom, G. 
Bronelew. W. 
Brewer, W. 
Brown, F. 
Bryning. W. 
Brown. James 
Burk, C. 
Bucktman, F. 
Bundersen. Jens 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlsen, Hans 
Capello. H. 
Carlson. A. 
Carlson. R. -656 
Carlson. J. -861 
Chotard, Emil 
Clewley. James 
Clark. S. D. 
Clauson, C. L. 
Cortes, P. 
Cook. H. 
Corl. V. 

Craig. C. A. 

Christensen, O. 

Panielsen. David 

Daniels, C. 

Panielsen. Ernest 

Dennett. J. 

Deboth, Paul 

Doran, Eugene 

Dorest. A. C. 

Dohman, F. 

Duncure, Y. 

Dudler, H. 

Edson, F. 

Kilvardsen. J. 

Ekeland, S. 

Ellingsen. H. 

Eltman. H. 

Englund, R. 

Englund, L. F. 

Engberg, O. 

Erikson. Olav 

Eriksen, Allen 

Eriksen, Viktor 

Eriksen, Konrad 

Eriksen, Aug 

Fskola, H. 

Evans, S. 

Ferraris, J. 

Fernandez, D. 

Fitzgerald, H. 

Fisher, T. 

Flynn. P. 

Karlson, G. -622 

Frivold. J. J. 

Fredriksen, W. 

Fricke, C. 

Frankenberg, V. 

Garbers, H. 

Gad. V. 

Camber, Jas. 

Gerner. Hans 

Oenstrom, F. 

Coerke. E. 

Codt. W. 

Grower. Alton 

Crunbolk, J. 

Green, J. 

Cunnason. J. 

Cundersen. G. 

Cunther. Richarl 

Cundersen. And. 

Custafsen. Karl 

Cutman. H. 

Hansen. Fred 

Hansen. H. -172S 

Hav. W. -1179 

Harker, Ud. 

Haker. Max 

TTartnett. W. 

TTansen. Maurice 

Hagen. C. L. 

Hansen. TT. C. F. 

Hansen. N. 

TTaee. A. 

Halherg. O. 

Hardy. W. 

TTansen. Albert 
TTansen, W. 
TTancrer. B. 
TTansen. J. E. 
TTaknnsen. John 
Helms. W. 
TTeldenbere, G. 
Hermansen, F. 
Henriks. G. 



Johan 
-1431 



E. -901 



D. 



Helenius, K. 
Henning, L. 
Hikelict, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg, W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holtl. J. W. 
Honde, P. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustide, H. 
Hultberg. E. J. 
Ingenretsen, John 
Ingebretsen, Karl 
In gal Is. W. L. 
Iversen, S. B. 
Isaksen. I 
Ivarsen, I. 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen, J. A. 
Jacobs. W. M. 
Jacobsen, Johan 
Jacobsen, H. M. 
Jacobsen, John 
Jack, P. 
Jacobs son, 
Jensen, P. 
Jensen, E. -1298 
Jensen, J. G. -1668 
Jensen. P. -748 
Jensen, J. G. -686 
Jnhansen, T. B. 
Johansen, A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johnsen. Aug. -1451 
Johnsen. Fr. 
Johnson, C. J. -1666 
Johnson, N. O. 
Johnson. Martin 
Johnson. H. L. 
Johnson, Tim 
Johnsson. John A. 
Johnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 
Jonsson. A. J. 
Jones. Fred. 
Jorgensen. Alf. 
Jorgensen, Th. 
Jorgensen. J. A. 
Jurgenson. John 
Jordt. P .-1737 
Jurgenson. Ernest 

Kahlbetzer, F. 

Karlson. J. A. -388 

Kanford. Ed. 

Karlstrom, C. 

Karslmer, N. J. 

Kermagoret, A. 

Kelly, P 

Kittelsen. K. 

Klnloeh. W 

Klemettilla. IT. 

Kloes. W. O. F. 

Kl.-mensen, C. 

Knofr. FT. 

Kristensen, 

Krause, E. 

Kreutz. C. 

Kristensen. K. 

Krager. H. 

Kristensen, G. 

Kroemke. N. 

Krousehet. A. T. 

Kristoffersen. Emil 

Kummerlowe, O. 

T.alx. N. E. 

Laine. W. E. -1414 

Larsen, H. -057 

Larsen. K. H. 

Larsen. H. -1115 

Larson, Mathias 

Larsen, Eingal 

Lemerle, C. 

Lepn. P. 

Le Fevre. L. 

Lersten, J, 

Lldgett, J, A. 

Lind. IT. E. 

TJe. L. 

Linden, H. Vanden 

TJndeman. H. 

Lie. J. L. 

Lorho. M. 

Lundo. i > 

Lundgren. R. 

Lubeck, R. A. 

Lysell, Cen. 

Mattson. F. 

Martinsen. K. 

Madsen. C. F. 

Mathisen, M. 

Marthinsen. Kr. 

Mayers. P. M. 

Mahan. W. F. 

McKenzie, A. 

Meas. J. 
M. strand. O. 
Mletenan, J. 
Mlrljo. A. 
Miller. C. W. 
Mikkelsen. Kr. 
Monehy. IT. 
Merken, J. L. 
Muller. P. 
Muller. H. 
Munhy, J. W. 
Nass, Axel 
Nesbitt, James 
Nielsen. N. -751 
Nilsen. Edwin 
Nilsen. B. S. -731 
Nielsen. Anders 
Nilsen, Olans 
Nilsen. C. L. 
Nielsen. N. K. V. 
Nilsen, K. C. -972 
Nilsen, C. V. 
Nilson. C. J. -885 
Norris, J. E. 
Nolan. James 
Nyhagen. Julius 
Nvstrom. Ragner 
Oextlger. O. 
Olsen. Ludvlg 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen. Oscar 
Olsen. Christ 
Olsen. Raynvald 
Olssen. Johan 

n, K. E. 
Olsen. H M. 
Olsen, Just. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 

BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & 

G STREETS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



GRIGGS' HARDWARE STORE 

SHIP CHANDLER 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street 

ABERDEEN, - - - WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



THE HUB 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING STORE 
L. FOGEL, Prop. 

Headquarters for Seamen'n Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 
to a Talior-made Suit. 

405 HERON STREET. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 

321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



Otto, L. Sten, Ivar 

Overland, T. Stervik, Louis 

Parkhurst, Thos. Sterr, W. T. 

Paulson, Hans Stuhr, H. M. 

Petersen, Ch. -990 strandquist, Louis 

Pettersen, Axel Steine I L 

Pedersen, L. Stickles, ' L.' A. 

Petersen, Peter stein, A. -1883 

Pederson, K. -980 Stewart, F. 

Pederson, John Sveerd S H. 

Pendville, N. Swanson, Hugo 

Peterson, Mauntz svensson, G. A. -1295 

Penosch, P. Taylor, A. 

Plummer, Karl Tereutt M. 

Prescott, P. F. Thomse'n, P. -1432 

Pohler, Joseph Thomas, Wm. 

Polge, Louis Thun, E. H. 

Rahm, Carl Thomassen, K. 

Rasmussen, C. -551 Titus Ed 

Rasmussen, R. -525 Tipp,' Joseph 

Reuter, Ernest Tolaas, K. 

Remmel, T. Tornquist. M. 

Reimann, Carl Torqusen K 

Rikkartsen, H. -597 Tonnesen', John 

Richard, Andreas „ _ _ 

Rosen, Frank L. Tr^ikE; B " 

Rosen, E. H. Udd, . Jo £" 

Rose, W. H. Unruh, Paul 

Ryberg, S. Xougt, C 
Quetski, Herman 



Vierich, R. G. 



Savage, R. 



Wallrath, K. 



<?am,?cr!n 'p 91 ^7 Wassemus, S. 

stmuelten, H. -ISOlWahlstedt, R. -778 

Schwartsloze, F. W a mp, S' £" 

Scherlan, R. S eb f r i ° T 5l 

Scott E G Westad, Johan 

Schroeder, Aug. Westerholm. A. W. 

Schieman, E. -1744 Wikhlad, Otto 

Schaffer, P. Wennick, And. 

Schoffler, A. Westin, C. O. 

Sebelin, C. Wenniche, Haldor 

Selander, J. Westbroch, Joe 

Shane, J. Wilhelm, H. 

Simmonds, A. E. Wiking, Aug. 

Sikemeyer, W. Willert, L. 

Sjoquist, G. Woadhull, C. 

Smith, Ed. Wurzbach, W. 

Smith, J. S. Wulff, M. 

Sorensen, H. -1106 York, J. 

Sohst, A. Zacko, K. 

Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, Chas -907Lundgren, C, -1295 

Anderson, Axel Magnussen, Judgen 

Anderson, J, -1514 Mattson, Emil 

Arnold, Ernest Melgail, M. 

Bartels, Herman McKenzie, Duncan 

Banthin, Julius Mulley, James 

Braun, William Nielsen, Jens 
Brun, Mathias -1492Clsen, Martin 

Eklund, S. W. -579 Olsen, Sigvald O. 

Fridlund, John Rasmussen, Akton 

Follis, Geo. Reay, S. A. 

Haak, Rheinhold Rehbein, Ernest 
Jensen, Albert -1650Rolesham, Jens W. 

Johansen, H. -2126 Rojahn. Aksel 

Kalberg, William Rollo, R. 

Kristensen, J, -1209 Rosenvold, Isak 

Laborde, Joseph Schade, Wenzel 

Lang, Gust. Smidt, Alfred 

Lonneker, Aug. Tidamann, Charlio 

Lowe, John A. Zink, Chas. 
Lubke, John Von 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 



EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m. except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonaple prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia 6ts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., or Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 



812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire-Latimer Block. Seattle, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713 

Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

•Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 
CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Encbom, Carl R. 
Eliassen, C. E. 
Evans, Staaley 
Grew, Jorgen 
Heine, C. 
Helms, William 
Hartman, Karl 
Knopff, Fritz 



Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, L. K. 
McLennan, Donald 
Olsen, Alfred 
Stachenssen, C 
Syvertsen, Syvaret 
Sande, Anton 
Tugland, Karl 



WORKERS UNION 




UHI0R#J 

factory No 



Understand 



BROTHER 
UNIONISTS 



That the best made shoes— the shoes made under the best manu- 
facturing conditions— the shoes that best stand wear— bear the Union 
Stamp, as shown herewith. 

Ask your dealer for Union Stamp shoes, and if he cannot supply 
you write 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION, 

246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 



__ _ _ -_ _ __ *w-^ *-* See that this label (in light blue) 

SMOKERSr^rr b » "°" *"* 



Issued by Autftority of uie Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

ShiS dCVtrfiKJ TI»tll»CI^>conU«dlnthltlio«laMb«nlM»^«Mia-UJSSlllbniMl 
aMCMKROF THCClCAHM*XEFO'IHItRMATION*lUNIOIIo< AlM.-KJ. U oljaniMtjon devoted tilths ad- 
vancement ol the MORAUIAlUlWand INTEllfCltWI MUAftt Of THC CRATf. Thei(Karawa ream/wo; 



these Ciaars to all smoker, throughout the world 
' All Infringements upon this Label will be 



ished according to law. 



7f U1A46U44. President, 



CM/UofAmmm 



Labor News. 



Prison labor will construct good 
roaus in Illinois if the plans of the 
Supervisors, County Commissioners 
and County Clerks are carried out. 

A three days' convention of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen 
and Enginemen opened at Detroit, 
Mich, on October 9. Close to 1500 
railroad men were in attendance. 

Less than 500 men were at work at 
New Orleans, La., on October 10 in 
the places of the 10,000 cotton hand- 
lers and loaders who are on strike in 
sympathy with the Cotton Screw- 
men's Union. 

John Mitchell, President of the 
United Mine Workers of America, an- 
nounces in the United Mine Workers' 
Journal that he will not be a candidate 
for re-election. Illness is believed to 
be the cause of Mitchell's withdrawal. 

President Small, of the Commercial 
Telegraphers' Union, was removed 
from office by a vote of the executive 
committee of the union, on account of 
his action in ordering that- the tele- 
graphers return to work. The execu- 
tive committee announces that the 
strike will be continued. 

Women clerks in Pittsburg (Pa.) 
department stores, who were warned 
that they would not be permitted in 
future to wear high pompadours 
while at work, have won their fight 
against the managers of the stores, 
and in future they will wear their hair 
any way they see fit. 

The candidacy of John P. White, 
President of District No. 13, United 
Mine Workers, which includes the 
miners of Iowa and Putnam County, 
Mo., for President of the national or- 
ganization has been announced from 
the State headquarters. The decision 
comes in view of the resignation of 
John Mitchell. 

The grievance committee of all 
yards under the jurisdiction of the 
Switchmen's Union of North America 
has formulated a demand for an in- 
crease in pay equal to that granted 
to the men in the Northwest. It is 
the purpose to ask for an increase of 
5 cents an hour, time and a half for 
overtime and double pay for Sunday 
work. 

The tenth biennial convention of 
the Amalgamated Association of 
Street and Electric Railway Em- 
ployes, at New Orleans, La., on Oc- 
tober 10, levied an assessment of $1 
a month per member in aid of the 
members on strike in San Francisco. 
There are about 69,000 members of 
the Association. The assessment will 
remain in effect until the strike ends. 

The Great Northern officials at Se- 
attle, Wash., have announced that the 
Hill system has granted an increase in 
wages and time allowances amount- 
ing to approximately $12 a month. 
The day's work of telegraph operators 
in the relay system is reduced from 
nine to eight hours a day, and 
Sunday overtime is raised from 40 
to 50 cents an hour. A number of 
other concessions are given the men. 

Arguments on the petition for a 
permanent injunction against the In- 
ternational Printing Pressmen and As- 
sistants' Union of America, which 
was charged by the United Typo- 
thetac and several publishing firms of 
Chicago, New York, St. Louis and 
other cities with having violated an 
agreement of last January in de- 
manding an eight-hour day, were 
heard by Judge Thompson in the 
Federal Court at Cincinnati, O., on 
October 12. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



Twenty-seven persons were killed 
nr wounded in a railroad wreck at 
Orio, about six miles from St. Sebas- 
tian, Spain. 

The Roods in the vicinity of Barce- 
lona, Spain, continue to be most seri- 
ous. Up to the present time five per- 
sons have been drowned and 30,000 
thrown out of work. 

Joseph H. Choate, head of the 
American delegation to The Hague 
Peace Conference, signed the final 
act of the conference on October 18, 
and the conference adjourned. 

A meeting between King Edward 
and the Czar has been arranged to 
take place at Copenhagen, Denmark, 
according to the Berlin correspondent 
of the Politikens. 

Despite repeated storms, a forecast 
of the Japanese rice crop of 1907 
shows an increase of 5 per cent, as 
compared with the crop of 1906, and of 
13.5 per cent as compared with the 
average. 

The British Foreign Office officials 
have refused to receive the envoys of 
Mulai llatig, Sultan of the South, and 
he will proceed to Berlin in an ef- 
fort to interest the German Foreign 
Office. 

The Danish steamer Alfred Erland- 
sen has been wrecked off Castle 
Point, near St. Abbs Head. Scotland. 
She went ashore during a gale on 
October 17 and twenty of her crew 
were drowned. 

Caid Anfloos, a Morocco chieftain, 
has seized Mogador on behalf of 
Mulai Ha fid, the rival Sultan. French 
warships have been sent to control 
the situation and there is fear of 
another bombardment. 

The town elections in St. Peters- 
burg (Russia) province have resulted 
in a complete constitutional Demo- 
cratic victory. The workmen in the 
suburbs of St. Petersburg are electing 
so-called Democrats. 

A gang of convicts who were be 
ing escorted to Tobolsk, Siberia, from 
Tyumen, Eastern Siberia, attacked 
their guards on October 6 and 
wounded six of them. The guards 
fired on the convicts, twenty-two of 
whom were killed. 

Plans that will convert Valparaiso 
into one of the world's largest and 
best ports have been accepted by a 
committer appointed by the Chilean 
President for the purpose. French 
engineers submitted their proposals. 
The work will take nine vears. 

Russian police statistics published 
en October 16 regarding terrorism 
during the month of September show 
that thirty-four persons were exe- 
cuted; that 207 persons, including 
seventy-three officials, were mur- 
dered, and that 172 people were 
wounded in various affrays. 

A correspondent of the Berlin 
Tageblatt at Emden telegraphs that 
according to a dispatch received from 
Borkum, a spying yacht with English 
naval officers on board had been cap- 
tured by two Wilhelmshaven torpedo 
boats. The officers are suspected of 
having taken soundings and made 
photographs in forbidden waters. 

The priests of the Department of 
Finistcrre, France, having generally 
refused to quit their presbytery, 
which reverted to the communes un- 
der the Church and State Separation 
law, are now being expelled by the 
aid of gendarmes. At many places re- 
sistance is encountered. At Relic the 
gendarmes were forced to break into 
the house of the presbytery in order 
to eject the priests, who were sur- 
rounded by weeping women. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
lust Office at the expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 



A.-is. i iskar 
Aaltonen, It. 
Abel, Paul 
Abrahamsen, John 
Ackerson, P. 
Ahlborg, R. W. 
Albrecht, Emil 
Albright, Emil 
Alksne, August 
Allen, Fred 
Amundson, F. A. 
Andersen. Flank 
Andersen, Oscar 
Andersen, j. Martin 
Andersen. -1156 
Anderson, Knut 
Anderson. Kans K. 
Anderson, Albin 
Anderson, A. C. 

And'M. son, -1149 

Anderson, -1218 
Anderson, -1229 
Bausback, -lsii 
Baxter, W. J. 
Bech, Niels 
Beling, Oscar 
Bennett, Harry H. 
Bensen, Sigurd 
Benson, John E. 
Berentsen, Oscar 
Berentsen, A. M. 
Berg, A. C. 
Berge, -645 
Berggren, V. 
Berglund, Nils P. 
Bergqulst, Stanley 
Bernard, Arthur 
Bjordal, Guilder 
Bjorkhoim, G. A. 
Black, John 
Caldwell. Wm. M. G 
Campbell, F. A. 
Canning, Jons 
Cannon, Martin 
Carlsen, Th. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, -s.63 
Carlson, Hans 
Carlson, Conrad 
Oarlsson, -1132 
Cavalin, G. 
Celander, W. 
Chambers, A. G. 
Christiansen. M. F. 
Christiansen, Fred 
Christiansen, Carl 
Dalgaard. -1042 
Dam. Otto 
1 'annevlg, M. 
Davis, Fred 
Davis, J J 
Day, H. E, 
De Baere, Henry 
Dempsey, Thomas 
Dempster, J. 
Baston, R. W. 
Edler, Carl 
Edolf, C. 
Kkman, Carl 
Ekstrand, Frank 
Ekvoll, Gus A. 
Elliott, John 
Ellsen, Fred 
Elueft, Robt. H. 
Fabricius, H. 
Fagerberg. Albin 
Fa men, W. L. 

Fennen, O. H. 

Fie liter, Philip 
Fleck, -1888 
Fijllls. Geo. 

Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gad, Sophus 
Gadd, Ernst 
Garten, Chris 
Gartz, Wm. 
Geensen. J. 
Gieger, Joseph 
GJerdahl, Ioren 
Uoedhoop, H. 
I laMorsen, H. 
Hull. Wm. T. 

tialvorsen, oiaf 

Halvorsen, -1418 
llalvorsen, -1425 
Halvorsen. M. 
Hammargren, O. 
I tampel, Wm. 
Hansen, -1250 
Hansen, -1267 
Hansen, K. Geo. 
Hansen, -1638 
en, -IT:':! 
Hansen, Frlthjof 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Hansen, -1352 
Hansen, -1250 
Hansen, -1090 
Hansen, -1769 
Hansen, A. C. 
Hansen, Hjalmar 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hansen, -1609 
Harmening, F. 
Harrison, Win. 

Ingeman, -132 
Isaacson. Isaac 

.la ih, Paul 

en, J. 
Jacobsen, Peder 
Jackson, C. L. 
Jakobsen, Ole 
Jakobsen, -1841 
Jakobsen, s. F. 
Jansen, K. 

1 779 
Jarvie, W. 
Jensen, Henrik 
Jensen, -1733 

Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, Iver 
Jensen. -1618 
Jensen, -li 
.]< nsen, -1826 
Johannessen, -1649 
.Johannes. 'ii, Albert 
Johannesen, V. 
Johannessen. M. E. 
Johannessen. -1656 
Johansen, 1677 
Johansen, -l":;' 1 
Johansen, -1081 



Anderson, -1469 
Anderson, -1520 
Anderson, Leonard 
Anderson, Emil 
Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson, Simon E. 
Anderson, Henry 
Anderson, Andrew N. 
Anderson, F. A. 
Anderson. -1026 
Andersson, -1514 
Andersson, -1232 
Andersson, E. F. 
Andreasen, O. L. 
Aibanen, V. E 
Arnesen, Adolf 
Aspen, Knut 
Axelsen, Axel 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Aylward, Jas. 

Blair, Francis 
Bogdon, Wm. 
Bono, Viktor 
Boreng, J. F. 
Boss. L. A. 
i'.'i.strom, -643 
Brandenburg, A.M.W 
Brandt, otto 
Brandt, Gus 
Brenner, Ludv. 
Brose, J. A. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Bruhn, Helnrlch 
Brumlinger, Paul 
Bryde, C. M. 
Burdick, Chaa. 
Burmeister, S. 
Byl, Jacob 
Christiansen, Bernt 
Christensen, M. 
Christensen, John 
Christensen, Chr. 
Christensen M. H. 
Christensen, N. F. 
Christiansen, Ferd. 
Christoftersen, Chr. 
Classen, Hinrich 
Claus, J. R. C. 
Clementz, Ole 
Oolbensen, Alf. 
Cox, H. 
Crisp, E. 
Cronin. O. H. 
Curtis, R. H. 
Dischler. Peter 
Dickenson, Joseph 
Domnisk, H. 
Donovan, L. 
Howling, S. Q. 
Doyle, W. 
Dunn, C. W. 
Dunne, Joseph 

Engberg, Oscar 
Englund, Hjalmar 
Ericksen, Karl H. 
Erikson, Konrad 
Erikson, Samuel 
Erikson, -513 
Esnault, Geo. 
Erikson, Viktor 

Folts, Frank 
Forstrom, Slvert 
Frandsen, Niels 
Frederiksen, -532 
Froberg. Fred 
Frose. Elias 
Furlong, Wm. 

Gower, John 
Greiner, R. 
Grosman, R. 
Gundersen, L. S. 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gunnarsson, Geo. 
Gustavson, Robert 
Guzak, B. 

Hartmann, G. 
ilartwig, Kurt 
Haugen, Lars 
Hedberg, Alfred 
Hedlund, -1726 
I ieesche, l lenry 
Heicke, Paul 
Helander, H. 
Helmros, G. 
Helstrom, Chas. 
Helmros, Gus. 
Henhusen, Peter 
Henriks. Gus. 
Henriksen, -17:'.7 
Henrikson, Peter 
Hermann, Helge 
Higgins, M. 
Hill, Gus. 
Hillesvig, Alf. 
Hocker, B. 
Hoffmann, Fritz 
Hoist, Richard 
Holste. Willy 
Hustede. H. 
Hutchinson, Hid. 

Isaakson, Gus 
Isberg. E. G. 

Johansen, -1692 
Johansen. -1866 
Johansen, Carl \v. 
Johansen, Geo. B. 
Johansen, Edward 
Johansen. Hjalmar 
Johanson, A. 
Johanson, Fred 
Johansson, K. H. 
Johnsen. -T, p. k. 
Johnsen, -1800 
Johnsen. Martin 
Johnsen, Peter 
Johnsen, John Aug. 
Johnson, Einar 
Johnsen, C. H. 
Johnsen, Andreas 
Johnson, A. A. 
Jonsson. -1491 
Jordan, Gus. 
Jordt, -1737 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, K. W. 
Jorgensen. Johan 
Jorgensen, Theo. 



Jorgensen. A. P. 
Juelsen, Ed. 

Kahlsen, -1198 
Kalnischke, Otto 
Kane, Geo. 
Karlgren, Aug. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Karlson, -603 
Karlstrom, R. 
Keedel, Chas. 
Kenniston, F. H. 
Kimeral. II. 
Kjarem, Sigurd 
Klenio, Alf. 
Kiesow, Paul 
Kirst. Hans 

Laakonen, J. v. 
Laakso, Axel 
Lagerhamm, P. 
Lahmeyer, -nsj 

I, .in. 11. org. C. W. 
Lang, Gus 

I'eter 
Lannqvlst, o. 
Larsen, A. P. 

I. a i sen. -1658 
Larsen, -12S6 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, -129(1 
Larsen, -1271 
Larsen, Karl Chr 
Larsen, -1287 
i. ars.>n, Chris 
Larson, Laurits S. 
Larson, -1113 
Larson, -1199 
I. arson. -1288 
I. arson. -1406 

Larson, -1417 
Lawson, Jonn 
Latschlng, Evald 

MaaS, Rudolf 
Mails, -n, 1593 
Mahsing, W. 
Malmgren, Wm. 
Malmqvist, ES. J. 
Mannonen, A. 
Mai kns. B. 
Martin, C. S. 
.Martin. Frank B. 
Martens. Jules 
Mara, Heinrich 
Mathiesen, T. L. 
Mathlesen, Harry 
Mathlsen, [ngolf 
Mattson, Renhold 
Mccarty, Jas 
McFall, Fred L. 
MeGoldrick, Jas. 

Naumann. Alf. 

.wis. n, -641 
Nelsen, 654 
Nelson, Ole 
Nesbit, J. 
Nestor, Wilson 
Nicoln. D. 
Nielsen, A. C. 
Nielsen, -754 
N'i.lsen, -678 
Nielsen. -a7:: 
Nielsen, A. J. 
Nielsen, Sivert 

i i'i 'minor, Robt 
O'Connor, Geo. 
Oedekoven, Franz 
Oesterling, Emil 
Ohman, Aug. 
Ohman, Aug, 
Oksanen, O. W. 
Olsen, Eugene 
Olsen, -499 
i >lsen, Anton 
olsen, -754 
Olsen. -996 
Olsen. -961 
861 
Olsen, -812 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, -534 

Paajanen. Johan 
Pankhurst, Thos. 
Paulsen, Elnar 
Paulsen, M. P. C. 
Paulsen, -920 
Pauson, Rudolph 
Payne, R. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, John 
Pedersen, Bertel 
Persson. H. W. 
Petersen, Hans 
Petersen, -782 
Petersen. -1223 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen. -709 

Raahange, J. F. 
Itajala, Viktor 
Randolf. D. W. 
Rantanen, W. 
Rask, Hjalmar 
Kasmussen, Akton 
Raymond, M. L. 
Reese, -685 
Reilley, J. W. 
Reynolds. Thomas 
Riehelsen, P. 
Rintzo. John 
Hollo, R. 

Saari, K. G. 
Sanders, Frank 
Sandqulst, G. 
Sarten, Chris 
Sauer, Emil 
Schelenz, Hans 
Sehmalkuche, Fr. 
Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidt, H. 
Schmuhl. Wm. 
Scholz, -1888 
Schotis, Albert 
SchOtt Herman 
Schroeder, Frea 
Si-hwetzer, H. 
Selander. W. 
Sellen, Geo. 



Juliusen, Jens 
Juliusen, Carl 

Kirwan, M. L. 

Kiltelsen. Chr. Th. 
Kofoed, Andreas 
Kokkala, ll. 
Korneliusen, Ben 
Knopf, Fritz 
Knnilsen, Luis 
Krandsen, Niels 
Krlstiansen, A. 
Krlstensen, Hans 
Kragstad, E. 
Krohnert, Alb 
Kullman, Karl 

Laurltsen, Geo. 

i iii.ie, Bertel 
I.eino, Emil 
Lewzey, Geo. 
Lindhal. Michael 
Lindholm, A. B. 
Lindskog, C. O. T. 
Lofman. K. 
Long, Harry 
l.ovin. Paul 
Lubeck. R. A. 
Luekman, Ewald 
Ludvigsen, Arne 
Lund. J. W. 
I.undberg, Carry 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Lundberg, Jacob 
Lundgren, A. 
Lungren, L. 
Lereh. Paul 
Lersten, J. 
Levsen. It. J. 
Lewis, Walter 
Lewis, Geo 

McLean, John 
Melan.l.r. Gus A. 
Melander, C. G. 
Mersman, A. 
Meyer, -1648 
Meyer, Frank 
Mi.haelsen. II. 
Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Mikkelsen, Axel M. 
Milander. Karl 
Mills, Geo. 
Mohle, Otto 
Moller, Nils 
Monsen, Hans 
Mortensen, M. H. 

Muller, Karl 
Mun. lay. 11. 
Murnlgkelt, F. 

Nielsen. -S71 
Nielsen, -973 
Nielsen, Otto 
Nielsen, -717 
Nilsen, Edvin 
Nilsen. H. 
Nilsen. -S8S 
Nilsen, Nils S. 
Nilsen, Ole Emil 
Nilsen. Martin 
Nilsen, Andrew 
Noel, L. K. 
Nordgren, Carl 

Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, IngvaJ 
Olson, Harold 
Olson. -597 
Olson, -978 
Olson, -562 
Olsson. Philip 
Opderbeck. Eugene 
Orchard, s. H. 
Ortiz, John 
Osborn, Winfred 
Osmun.lsen, -937 
Osterman, Karl 
Ostlund, Edw. 
' iverbo. Nils 
< iveiland, Tom 

Peterson, S. 
Peterson, -1019 

Peterson, Axel 
Petschow, W. 
Pettersen. O. T. 
Pettersen, Karl J. 
Petrow, F. 
Pheiffer, Karl 
Pietschmann, Geo. 
Pidersen, Olaf A. 
Pontynen, -1054 
Porrier, S. J. 
Prendl, Ludv. 
Prinz, Chas. 
Probst, R. 

Rolstad, O. E. 
Rono, Victor 
Kosbeck, Gus 
Rosengreen, A. 
Rosengren, Frans 
Rosenholm, O. 
Rosenstrom, Frank 
Rostad, Jacob 
Roth, Svend T. 
Rottol, A. S. 
Rudberg, C. 
Ryden, A. Oskar 

Sexon, Chas. 
Shawl, W. M. 
Simpson. Lewis C. 
Simonsen, Fred 
Siewertsen, Martin 
Sikman, A. 
Slndahl, Jens 
Sorensen, -1607 
Skold, C. A. 
Smedsvig, Peder 
Staemmler, Hugo 
Stange, Anton 
Stein, G. 
Stervik, Ingvald 
Stone, L. W. 
Strokark, Paul 
Suckow. Franz 



Smith, John A. 
Smith, John V. 
Sodergren, -1972 
Soderman, M. 
Sorensen, -1822 
Soto, Pedro 
Speer, Kurt 
Spin, Knud A. 
Stremmel, Harry 
Sullivan, Stephen 

Tauson, R. 
Tavares, J. E. 
Tennant, Thomas 

i homasen, o. K. 
Thompsen, Th. 
Thorman, H. 
Thome, -656 
Thorne, Gus 
Thorn, Arvid 

ihornstrom, A. 
Thorsen, Johan 

(Jdbye, Harold 

Vejoda, F. 
Verdick, O. 
Vldot, Win. 
Von Asperen, w. 

Wagner, Claude 
\\ aiders, W. 
Wanlum, Gus. O. 
Wakely, R E. 
Waloerg, Kudolf 
vVallace, Geo. 
w alter, Erich 
v\ asenlus, s. 
v. ".-de, Fritz 
Westuofer, ilenry 



Sundhblm, Axel A. 
Sundkvist, Chas. 
Svendsen. -1903 
Svensen. Anker 
Svensson, -1795 
Svensson, -1188 
Swanne, H. 
Bwanson, Chas. 
Swensen, Otto 
Swenson, -1932 

'Ihorsen, Torger 
'i ol.iii, Austin 
Tollefsen, Andreas 

r, Eugene 
Trendl, Ludv. 
Trentanl, Lewis 
'1 urn Rudolf 
Tuominen, A. 
Turner, Willy 
Turner, M. A. 
Turner, Ted 

I'rilie, Felix 

. .ilell. Last 
Von Versen. 10. 
Vortman, Wm. 
Vucic. V. 

Westln, John 
Westman, A. 
\\ lechmann, Aug. 

W ii.su.ind, -937 
V\ ikinan, Peter 
Wills, (Jeo. 

w Inberg, oskar 
Wold, Haakon 
Wychgel, -970 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Sam 
Albertsen, F. 
Ahlquist, A. 
Armstrong, Fr. 
Anderson, G. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, -1235 
Anflndsen, O. 
Bowman, C. 
liailei, W. 
Bjurk, A. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Budendltsh, G. 
Benson, C. 
i_'inieiise, y. 
OanDerg, It. 
oupon, J. 
uanluorl, D. 
Easlon, R. W. 
Eliason, E. 
Edelinan, G. 
Planning, K. 
Fox, E. J. 
Flathead, C. 
Guthrie, R. 
Uullacsen, H. 

Gjerund, B. 

LTismetrvid, c. J. 

Hansen, C. B. 
tlolinsuoni, Ch. 
i law Kins, M. 
Henrickson, M. 
Heart, Ch. 
riarbeek, Th. 
Hanson, G. 
Jensen, G. L. 
Johannesen, H. 
Jsaaksen, G. 
Joseposen, F. 
Joransson, P. J. 
Johnson, -1451 
Klintboui, M. 
Knudsen, H., -419 
ivetola, H. 
■vine, J. A. 
i^undin, A. 
LiauritBon, G. 
i-ampu, -s. 
Liunaolad, E. 

,-unde, O. 
cuulow, J. 
Maibolim, H. 

Mortensen, VVm. 

jiiller, J. 
Nystrom, E. 
.Nordman, V. 
Nielsen, A. 
iNelson, -9U6 
olsen, E., -515 
oisen, J. 
i'rager, H. 
f olson, J. 
Pedersen, N. C. 
i-orter, Ch. 
Palmroth, C. E. 
itoy, J. A. 
svensen, B. 
Squires, J. 
Simonsen, F. 
Smith, C. 
iurnquist, E. 
Wikblad, Otto 
Wells, L. 



Aasprong, G. 
Andersen, A., -853 
Anderson, John 
Arnold, Er. 
Andersen, A., -1U57 
Anderson, C. 
Almeida, J. C. 

Bartholomew, W. 

Lrander, W. 
Brueklond, E. 
Boe. D. 
1. uttgereit, L. 

Deising, E. 
Dituncier, C. 

ureaia, Joe 

Ue Uioot, J. 
Enianuelson, a. 
Erlckson, M. 

Fuchs, J. 

Forstrom, O. 

Gasman, G. 
Gundersen, o. 

Ooddard, M. 
Ulaugard, ]_,. 

Haaland, J. 

Hansen, Carl 
Hubenette. J. 
lieivig, J. 
rioiten, O. J. 
Hicks, J. 

Johnson, Carl 
Jorgensen, J. P. 
Johansson, -1518 
Jensen, J. M. 
Jansen, J., -1555 

Kalsen, C. 
Koso, P. 
Klover, H., -463 

Lomquist, O. 

Dundia, C. 

Littorln, E. 
Lentonen, W. 

Larsen, E. A. 
Lursn, K. J. 
Mulley, J. 
Melland, O. 

Nilsen. Ed. 
Nyman, A. 
Nystrom, R. 

Olsson, Johan 

Peed, J. 
Perkins, D. 
Pierson, A. 
Passon, B. 

Itislaksen, O. 
Swanson, J. 
Svensson, S. 
Swanne, 11. 
Schmidt, Fr. 
Thogersen, T. 
Waring, H. 






Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Andersen, Olaf 
Armmi, Walter 
Bastram, C. 
Corlssan, Oscar 
Ekwall, Gust. A. 
Eynstane, W. 
Falrig, John 

Fleurie, Georges 

Gustafson, Edrow 
Hamenlng, Fritz 
Jensen, Hans 

Johansen, Hans 
Johnsen, J., No. 



Knaff, I-'ritz 
Knudsen, Jacob E. 
Larsen, Charley 
Larsen, Martin 
Nylund, Sven 
Nlccolle, Sant 
a, A. 

PotuganskJ, R. 
Swehske, Carl 
Spettelan, Benl 

'i'ha resell. Peter 
Wehde, Fritz 
5 Wel'strand, C. F. 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Between King and Berry Streets, San Francisco. 

GENTS', BOYS', AND YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises. Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price, give us a call. I» 
not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTO R N E Y - AT - L AW 

60* Golden Gate Ave., Cor. Polk. 
Phone Market 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



SULLIVAN'S SHOES 



(Established 30 years.) 




Union 
Made and 



Strong 

MARKET STREI 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Sur- 
plus $ 2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in 
cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 38,156,931.28 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, Willinm 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



THE ONLY BANK THAT RE- 
MAINS OPEN SATURDAY AF- 
TERNOONS AND EVENINGS. 

The Market Street Bank 

(Commercial and Savings.) 

INTEREST: 

Savings — Term, 4 per cent. 
Deposits — Ordinary, 3J/2 per cent. 

Drafts, Letters of Credit and Trav- 
elers' Checks issued, payable any- 
where throughout the world. 

Solicit the accounts of Unions, Cor- 
porations, Firms and Individuals, 
subject to check. 

Safe Deposit Vaults, one of the most 
convenient in the West, renting 
boxes from $2.50 up. 

Southeast corner Seventh and Mar- 
ket Streets. 



EXPRBSSIIVQ 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411, San Francisco| 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 



JOHN RBGNIER 

EXPRESSING 

Stand, 44-46 East Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 
CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



CAPT. CHRISTEINSEIN 

( POLORES 

Inventor of CHRISTENSEN'S 1 SOLAR AZIMUTH COMPASS 

( DISTANCE FINDER 
Has opened a School of Navigation at 82 MARKET STREET, ROOM 22, 
where practical navigation for passing U. S. examinations for steam and sail 
will be taught. 

Terms on application. 




CHARLES LYONS of London 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

SUITS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

OVERCOATS TO ORDER FROM $18.00 UP 

TROUSERS TO ORDER FROM $5.00 UP 

1432 FILLMORE ST. ) 

731 VAN NESS AVE. V SAN FRANCISCO 

771 MARKET St., Bulletin Bldg. J 958 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Room 3 



J. COHEN & CO. 



Baltimore Olothing: Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 
HEADQUARTERS. FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters 
Boss of the Road and Can't Bust 'Em Overalls, 75 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR WALK OVER SHOES 




Established 1877 



VON SCHOEN'S 

Navigation 
School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE, 
Steuart St. - - - Near Folsom 

Masters, Mates, Pilots and Engineers prepared to pass EXAMINA- 
TION for United States License. 

SHIPS' COMPASSES ADJUSTED. 

Bedrooms can be had in the Institute at $6 and $8 per month. Bathe. 
Officers' Sitting Room. 



Domestic and Naval. 



A Belgian syndicate is said to have 
been formed to operate a direct line 
of turbine steamships between Ant- 
werp, New York and Boston. 

Following the announcement that 
theatrical performances will be given 
on the Cunard liners, it is said that ar- 
rangements have been made with the 
Nort't German Lloyd line to present 
vaudeville turns on t lie steamers of 
that company. 

The present monopoly of schooners 
in the lath business from the provinces 
to Philadelphia is threatened by the 
invasion of steamships. Thomas B. 
Hammer has chartered the British 
steamship Alice to carry a full cargo 
from Chaleur, New Brunswick, to 
Philadelphia. 

It is reported that Charles W. 
Morse, head of the Consolidated 
Steamship Company, is making ar- 
rangements for a line of steamers to 
ply on the St. John River, between 
St. John and Fredericton. It is under- 
stood that the line will be opened 
early next summer. 

The Navy Department has practi- 
cally decided to ask Congress for four 
battleships, two of which shall be 
sister-ships to the 20,000-ton Delaware 
and North Dakota, authorized by the 
last Congress and already contracted 
for, and the other two still larger. 

The six-masted schooner William 
Douglas, which for the last fifteen 
months has been engaged in transport- 
ing oil from Texas to New York, has 
been released from her charter, and 
will shortly engage in the coal carry- 
ing trade to Boston. She is now hav- 
ing her oil tanks removed. 

The old Clyde liner Yemassee 
which, for years, ran regularly in the 
passenger and freight trade between 
Philadelphia, Pa., and Norfolk and 
Richmond, and which was recently 
turned into a barge, has been char- 
tered to load 2200 tons of coal at the 
former port for New England. 

The first practical step in the inau- 
guration of a new steamship line be- 
tween Philadelphia and New Orleans 
was taken recently, when a represent- 
ative of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
met prominent shipping and commer- 
cial men at Philadelphia, Pa., to dis- 
cuss the question of a terminus and 
other important matters pertaining to 
such a service. 

The attention of the United States 
Hydrographic Office will be called to 
the necessity of the Government dis- 
patching one of its cruisers or revenue 
boats to watch the course of icebergs 
off the Grand Banks, so as to aid in 
minimizing the dangers to transatlan- 
tic travelers during the season when 
these floating icefields loom up in the 
path of steamships. 

The Government is negotiating with 
the New England Gas and Coke 
Company for the charter of three 
colliers -Maiden, Everett and Mel- 
rose, to transport coal to ban Fran- 
cisco and Honolulu. The capacity of 
each is 7100, and the Navy Depart- 
ment wishes to charter them for a 
year. 

Concessions having been made by 
the Morse interests to the demands of 
the Marine Engineers' Beneficial As- 
sociation, which went into effect Oc- 
tober 1, no interference was made 
with the regular run of the Clyde 
steamships between Philadelphia, Pa., 
and Norfolk and New York. The 
only coastwise corporation that re- 
fused to concede to the Association's 
terms is the Merchants and Miners' 
Transportation Company. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Force of Habit.- "I declare I never 
saw such a fellow. Ilr is always cut- 
ting up." 

"But, then, you must remember he 
is a medical student." — Baltimore 
American. 



Near Profanity. — "Swaddleford, I 
wish you wouldn't use so much bad 
language in my presence." 
"Bad language, Biddlecombe?" 
"Yes; your attempts to talk French 
art- simply vile." — Chicago Tribune. 



I lidn't Knmv. - • I [ostess - "I .et's 
game of bridge. You play, 
don't you, Miss Greenli 

Miss Greenley — "Well, really. T 

don't know. You See, I've never 
tried." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



The Useful Wife. — "Does Jones 
think he's any better off since he got 
married ?" 

"Yes; he -ays he has SOme one tO 
thread his needle now when he want- 
in sew on a button." — Judge. 




After the Show- Sweet Singer — 
"The leading man does not get so 
many curtain calls since he has been 
married." 

Comedian — "No: I think he 
more curtain lectures." — Chicago 
News. 



Overheard on the Street. "Bedad, 
Larry, yez look all out av hrith!" 

"( >i am thot. ()i nearly raced my- 
silf to dith troyin' to ketch a Welsh 
rabbit. Bui yez finger is bladin'. 
Phwat is th' trouble, me bye?" 

"Oh, Oi got bit by a mock turtle." 
— Chicago Xews. 



Alfred's Inference. — "I see that a 
man in Kansas has applied for a pat- 
ent on a Spanking machine lie has 
invented." chuckled Mr. Flithcrs, look- 
ing up from his paper. 

"Did he have to invent one. pa?" 
asks little Alfred, "because there are- 
n't any more women like mamma?" — 
Success Magazine. 

The latest: 

SAN JUAN 

2 for 25c. 
and 10c. 

High Grade Union Made Cigar. 
All the Leading Brands 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 
/. 5. U. of A. Buttons For Sale 

GUS. HOLMGREN 

154 EAST ST. San Francisco 



J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 



Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 



A $20 Suit 
for $15 



Every retail clothier, as you 
know, buys of the wholesalers 
or manufacturers except S. N. 
WOOD C& CO. We are manu- 
facturers and sell direct to you. 

If you buy a suit here you may 
save that profit which the retailer 
is compelled to make. In short, 
you buy for the same price as any 
retail clothier pays. 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 



UPTOWN STORE 

Fillmore and Ellis Sts. 



DOWNTOWN STORE 

730 Market St. 



OAKLAND STORE 

Washington and 11th Sts. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 
THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON SA VINGS DEPOSITS 

Authorized Capital $ 800,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus :;■ 

Total Assets 2,200,000 

Money forwarded to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CIIAS. NELSON, President. HENRY WILSON. 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President. ALBEUT SUTTON. 

L. M. MacDONALO, Cashier. MARTIN SANDERS. 

J. C. ESC11KN. W. H. LITTLE. 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 



United States Nautical College. 



CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD 



Principal 



Th.- oldest navigation school on the 
etabllshed 1875) offers vou 
advantages that can not be obtained efse- 
wheie. 

inn methods are short, thorough. 

ad practical; the pi i< •-.-- are moder- 
ate, and you are assured of a "square 

Terms on Application. 
Sailors' Home. San Francisco. 



ISSUED BY AUTHORITY Or 




D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 
AGENTS FOR 
STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 
UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 
HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 
FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 
INo. 4 MISSIOIN ST., near East, SAIN FRANCISCO 



Union Made 

Pants 
2.00 to 5.00 

With a guarantee of a new 
pair free if they don't wear 

Wallenstein & Frost 

VAN NESS AND GOLDEN GATE AVES. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

W. L Douglas 

SHOES 

ALL STYLES AT THE 

Union Outfitting Co. 

Complete Men's Outfitters From 

Top to Bottom. 

26 EAST STREET 

BETWEEN MARKET AND MISSION. 



*£) "oobsud SyntAuflnnty ol th« <-»- oj 

IroaMm wwiraiu.^gsfe^ international 




SORENSEN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

For lO Years 6th and Mission Sts. 

715 MARKET STREET, Near Third 
12S5 FULTON STREET, Near DevUadero 
2593 MISSION STREET, Cor. 22nd Street 



THREE STORES: 

Phone Connections for all Stores 



JAMES A. SORENSEN 

PRES. AND TREAS. 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



22K, 18K AND 14K WEDDING RINGS IN STOCK 



UINIOIN 



MADE 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 18SQ 

Temporary Address, No. 775 Twenty-Second Street. 
Via Key Route. OAKLAND, CAL. 

School will be permanently located in San Francisco about November 
1st, at the corner of Washington and Battery Streets. 

Captain Henry Taylor will have a Law Office in the same location. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

530 HAIGHT ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 

BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. P. 



THE NATIONAL. 

WANTED— 150 men to sleep in 
our new and clean beds; 25 and 50 
cents per night. 217 East street. 
between Washington and Jackson 
streets, San Francisco. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXI, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1907. 



Whole No. 1046. 



BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



THE Fortieth Annual Congress of the Trade- 
Unions of the United Kingdom was held at 
the Assembly Rooms, Bath, on Monday, 
September 2, and five following days. The Con- 
gress was presided over by the Chairman of the 
Parliamentary Committee, Mr. A. H. Gill, M. P., 
Secretary of the Bolton Provincial Operative Cot- 
ton Spinners' Association. The standing orders 
of the Congress provide that it shall consist only 
of representatives of trade-unions who are ac- 
tually working at their trades at the time of their 
appointment, or are permanent paid officials of the 
unions they represent. Trade unions may send 
one delegate for every 2,000 members or fraction 
thereof, but many of the larger unions do not 
send the full number of delegates to which they 
are entitled. Voting on important questions is by 
card, on the principle of one vote for every 1,000 
members represented. The analysis into groups 
of trades given below shows the composition of 
the Congress, and the trade groups represented 
are compared with the corresponding figures for 
the Congress of 1906: 



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The number of organizations accounted for in 
the above statement is 173, but allowing for the 
number of distinct societies included in Federa- 
tions, and sending delegates of their own, mem- 
bers of about 236 separate trade-unions attended 
Congress as delegates this year out of a total of 
1,136 unions in existence. The membership rep- 
resented, however, comprised over 80 per cent, of 



the total membership of all trade-unions. The 
number of organizations represented this year 
was 8 more than in 1906, while the total member- 
ship was greater by 143,857. Most of the groups 
of trades showed an increase in membership, es- 
pecially the textile group, the mining group, the 
railway and other transport group, and the mis- 
cellaneous group (which consists largely of shop 
assistants and clerks). In the miscellaneous 
group the increase is due to some extent to the 
establishment of new unions of women workers 
and of theatrical employes; while in the other 
groups mentioned the change was mainly due to 
increased membership of previously existing 
unions. 

Among the principal industrial subjects on 
which the Congress passed resolutions were: Re- 
striction of the hours of labor to eight per day 
for miners and work-people generally; Old Age 
pensions; amendment of the Mines Regulation 
Act, the Factory and Workshop Acts, the Shop 
Hours Act and the Cheap Trains Act; certificates 
of competency for persons in charge of steam 
engines and boilers; improved housing of the 
working classes; the wages and general condi- 
tions of labor of Government workers, and of 
workers employed by contractors for the Govern- 
ment; representation of trade-unions at Board of 
Trade and at coroners' inquests; the establish- 
ment of a legal minimum wage in selected trades; 
State help for blind workpeople; abolition of the 
premium bonus system; abolition of night work 
in bakeries; and free secondary education. A 
resolution in favor of compulsory arbitration in 
trade disputes was rejected by a majority of 660,- 
000, and a resolution in favor of the introduction 
of a bill to secure the reference of all disputes to' 
a Conciliation Board, with power to arrange 
settlements subject to the consent of both parties, 
was rejected by a majority of 85,000. 

A resolution was adopted calling upon Parlia- 
ment to apply the provisions of the Foreign En- 
listment Act to British subjects who accept em- 
ployment in Great Britain to serve as strike- 
breakers in foreign countries. The Foreign En- 
listment Act makes it unlawful for British sub- 
jects to serve in the army of any foreign country. 
In another resolution the attention of the public 
is called to the unprincipled methods in vogue in 
the industrial depots operated by the Salvation 
Army. 

The voting by Congress for members of the 
Parliamentary Committee for the ensuing year 
resulted in the election of representatives of the 
following organizations: Boilermakers and Imn 
and Steel Shipbuilders, Amalgamated Carpenters 
and Joiners, Cotton Spinners, National Dock La- 
borers, Amalgamated Engineers, Gasworkers and 
General Laborers, Amalgamated Brassworkers, 
Miners' Federation, London Compositors, Rail- 
way Servants, Northern Counties Weavers, As- 
sociated Shipwrights, Boot and Shoe Operative-., 
Cigarmakers, Musicians and Patternmakers. Mr. 
D. J. Shackleton, M. P. (Northern Counties 
Weavers), was appointed by the Parliamentary 
Committee as its Chairman for the ensuing year. 
It was decided that the next Annual Congress 
should be held at Nottingham. 

The foregoing is reprinted from the Labor 
Gazette, official publication of the British Board 
of Trade. Concerning the action of the Trade 



Union Congress in again defeating a proposal for 
compulsory arbitration, the following account of 
trade disputes during one month, from the same 
source, is interesting: 

Twenty-seven new disputes began in August, 
1907, as compared with 27 in July, 1907, and 28 
in August, 1906. By the 27 disputes, 4,829 work- 
people were directly and 3,587 indirectly affected, 
and these figures, when added to the number of 
workpeople affected by old disputes which began 
before August and were still in progress at the 
beginning of the month, give a total of 13,912 
workpeople involved in trade disputes during Aug- 
ust, 1907, compared with 23,776 in July 1907 
and 14,096 in August, 1906. 

Of the 27 new disputes, 11 arose on demands 
for increased wages, 3 on objections to reductions 
in wages, and 2 on other wages questions, 5 or. 
questions of the employment of particular classes 
or persons, 4 on questions of trade-union principle, 
and 2 on details of working arrangements. 

Definite results were reported in the case of 
18 new disputes, directly affecting 2,658 persons, 
and 14 old disputes, directly affecting 3,514 per- 
sons. Of these 32 new and old disputes, 13, di- 
rectly involving 2,223 persons, were decided in 
favor of the workpeople; 12, directly involving 2,038 
persons, were decided in favor of the employers; 
and 7, directly involving 1,911 persons, were com- 
promised. In the case of 4 other disputes, di- 
rectly involving 1,824 persons, work has been re- 
sumed pending further negotiations. 

The aggregate duration in August of disputes 
that started or were settled in that month was 
138,600 working days. In addition, 46,800 working 
days were lost during August owing to disputes 
which began before that month, and were Still 
in progress at the end of the month. Thus the 
total duration in August of all disputes, new and 
old, was 185,400 working days, as compared with 
288,600 in the previous month, and 109,100 in the 
corresponding month of 1906. 

Touching the question of workmen's compen 
sation for accidents, we quote from the Labor 
Gazette as follows: 

The statistics respecting arbitrations in county 
courts under the Workmen's Compensation Acts 
in England and Wales show that in 553 eases of 
.compensation to dependants in cases of fatal in- 
jury, the average amount awarded was £191. In 
cases of non-fatal accident a lump sum averag- 
ing £36 was awarded in 124 cases; a weekly 
amount averaging lis. 6d. was awarded in 326 
cases of total incapacity, and a weekly amount 
averaging 9s. lOd. in 175 cases of partial inca- 
pacity. 

The statistics relating to cases in which mem 
oranda recording agreements or awards by pri- 
vate arbitrators under the Workmen's Compen 
sation Acts were registered in England and Wales 
show that the average of the awards to depend- 
ants in cases of fatal injury was E167. the aver- 
age in cases of incapacity being £42 (lump sum), 
or 13s. 3d, (weekly payment). For mine workers 
the average was £68 (lump sum), or 13s. 9d. 
(weekl) payment); for building operatives the 
amounts were £47, or 14s. 5d.; for agricultural 
workers, £16, or 9s. 4d. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SHANGHAIING A CRIMP. 



I was certainly in a sorry plight on the par- 
ticular November morning which I have in 
mind at this writing. A cold, piercing north- 
east wind vented its ire on everything and 
everybody out of doors, while its collabora- 
tor in the general scheme of atmospheric CUSS- 
edness, a drizzling downpour of rain, took 
the starch out of things in a way which gave 
an air of bcdraggledness to the landscape that 
had a most depressing effect on the spirits. 
1 was wet to the skin, shivering with cold, 
hungry, penniless, and. to cap all, attired in 
a rig which unmistakably proclaimed me to 
the few "cullud gemmen" who were astir at 
that early hour as being of the genus "po' 
white trash," species hobo. I had just alight- 
ed from a freight train on the outskirts of 
Brunswick, da., and was debating with my- 
self as to what I had better do next. A week 
before that I had run away in Savannah from 
one of the hardest "blue nose" packets it has 
ever been my misfortune to get shipped in. 
It goes without saying that I got away with 
nothing but what 1 stood up in at the time 
1 made my escape from her. Your "blue 
nose" bucko can always be trusted to watch 
his flock sharp so long as there is any wool 
left on them to be shorn. 1 had purposely 
tarried on the road between the two ports so 
as to make quite sure that she had sailed be- 
fore 1 got into Brunswick, for it was no un- 
common thing in the South in those days for 
masters of vessels whose crews had run away 
to have them brought back in irons from some 
port a couple of hundred miles distant from 
the port in which the desertion had taken 
place. While on the road I had worked two 
davs for a farmer, painting his barn, for which 
I had been paid at the rate of 50 cents a day 
and board. The dollar was soon Spent, but 
as a reminder of the job 1 was bespattered 
from head to foot with yellow, green and 
white paint, looking very much as though I 
had burglarized a paintshop and gotten away 
with the goods. 

But, to resume, I was too hungry and too 
chilled by my long ride on the freight train, 
to do any sustained thinking, and so, domi- 
nated by the instinct of the seaman, I began 
mechanically to wend my way toward the 
waterfront, unconsciously associating in my 
mind the satisfying of my hunger with the 
element on which I had during so many years 
earned my daily bread. Going down one of 
the side streets I noticed across the way a 
large swinging sign on which were painted 
the flags of the leading maritime nations. 
A gigantic shamrock, done in shimmering 
green, occupied an intermediary position, and 
beneath it, in large white letters, appeared the 
following legend : 

Seamen's Private Boardinghouse. 

WELCOME! 
J. T. Gallagher, Proprietor. 

"Ah !" 1 said to myself, "what a nice 
looking spider's parlor that is, but I'll have 
to do the fly act or famish." 

I walked over and knocked at the door. 
It was opened by a large, red-haired woman. 
fat and forty, who eyed me inquiringly. 

"Are you Mrs. Gallagher?" I asked, polite- 
ly, doffing my battered apology for a hat. 

"( )i am," came the answer in a booming 
contralto voice, whose deep diapason made 
me feel devoutly thankful that I was not J. T. 
Gallagher. "Phwat d'yez want?" 

I explained to her that I was a runaway 
sailor looking for a boardinghouse in which to 



Stay until I could procure another ship. 
While 1 was speaking she. placed her arms 
akimbo and looked me over scornfully. 
When I had concluded she gave a loud snort 
and burst out: 

"A sailor is it yez are? Shure yez looks 
more loike a painther than a sailor. Git out 
o' here ye dirthy bum. It's the loikes av yez 
that come 'round here an ate dacint paiple out 
av house an' home, an' me with a fam'ly of 
children to shupport! Oi've a good moind 
to have yez arristed, ye impudent shpalpeen." 

The smell of frying bacon came tantaliz- 
ingly wafting through the open door, making 
me almost frantic, while the call of the frying 
pan was wrestling with my innards in a fash- 
ion that set my mouth watering. I put on my 
most engaging smile, determined to do or to 
die. 

"Madam." I began, insinuatingly, in my 
sua vol voice. "1 assure you — " 

"Arian g'wan now. ye smirkin' blackguard. 
Git. or Oi'll— " 

The command to "git" was accompanied by 
an inchoate movement of the right arm as if 
about to reach behind the door for something, 
so I beat a rather undignified retreat, sadly 
reflecting that I had once more fully demon- 
strated the sorrowful fact that as a ladykiller T 
am distinctly a "never was." 

A few minutes' walk brought me to the 
waterfront, where I arrived in a frame of 
mind not at all cheerful. The only shelter 
from the weather in sight was a long, low 
shed, beneath which was stored a quantity of 
kiln-dried lumber, and thither I went and sat 
me down to "ruminyte hon me hun'appy tvte," 
as "Cockney" Hob used to say. Looking up 
dejectedly after a while I saw on a nearby 
corner the familiar exterior of a saloon with, 
ye gods! the usual announcement, "Free 
Lunch All Day," conspicuously displayed in 
the window. From experience I knew-, how- 
ever, that it was yet too early for free lunch, 
or I would assuredly have gone in and made 
an onslaught on it, chancing a clubbing from 
the bartender afterward. 

I was just on the point of turning my gaze 
away from that exasperating free lunch sign 
when the door of the saloon opened, and a 
tall and rather goodlooking chap stepped out 
on the sidewalk, where he stopped in an irres- 
olute sort of way. Where had I seen that 
face before? Could it be — yes, it was Dutch 
Marry. There was the red. ugly scar over the 
left eye, near the temple, where I had once 
struck him with an iron belayingpin. It hap- 
pened when we were shipmates in the ship 
Elbridge Lehman. I was night watchman of 
her in Antwerp. One night I caught Dutch 
Harry coming out of the cabin carrying a 
gunnybag on his shoulder half filled with 
M'mvs. and making for the rail nearest the 
dock. When he found that he had been dis- 
covered he showed fight, and in the scuffle 
that ensued he drew a knife on me. In self- 
defense I jumped to the main fiferail, grabbed 
one of the two heavy iron belayingpins to 
which the topsail sheets were belayed at sea, 
and dealt him a stunning blow over the left 
temple that stretched him senseless on the 
deck. 

Naturally I didn't expect much show ' of 
goodwill from him, even if he should deign 
to recognize me at all, which was more than 
doubtful. What was my astonishment then, 
when, as he caught sight of me, I saw him 
stride toward me with outstretched hand and 
a look of glad surprise on his face, and heard 
him exclaim: 



"Hello, hello! Well, well! Where th'ell 
did you spring from?" 

Then, noticing my bedraggled and forlorn 
appearance, he went on : 

"Where in blazes have you been? in the 
river? Come an' have a drink." 

Inwardly reproaching myself for having 
done him an injustice I followed him into the 
saloon. There, over the glasses, I told my 
little tale of woe as only a sailorman can tell 
such things to another sailorman. 

"That's all right, old shipmate," said 
Dutch Harry cheerily; "I'll see you right, me 
boy. Come along with me an' have break- 
fast. I'll take you to a good house where 
you can stay's long's you like an' pick your 
own chance." 

"That's good," I replied. "As I have no 
clothes I'd like to make a short voyage to the 
West Indies and back to some port south of 
llatteras. so as to get a good bag of duds 
again before going on a longer voyage. Do 
you know of any such chance around here?" 

"I have the very thing you are after," he 
said ; "a nice little handy bark going from 
here to Demerara and back again. A regu- 
lar home she is: watch an' watch blow high or 
low ; feeds like a hotel; captain an' mate both 
religious ; oh ! she's a daisy, I tell you." 

'Aon see," he added, confidentially, "I'm 
running for the house I'm taking you to, an' 
I'll do the best 1 can for you, me boy." 

( >n hearing this all my old distrust of him 
returned. 1 could now understand his pre- 
tended friendliness. Ir was all in line with 
his other duties as a sailors' boardinghouse 
runner, and I made up my mind to keep my 
weather eye open for him after that. 

As I noted the direction in which we walked 
I inquired of Dutch Harry who he was run- 
ning for. 

"Jim Gallagher." he replied; "as fair an 
square a man to a sailor as there is anywhere. 
\ on can bet he won't let you go to sea short 
of anything. He went to Savannah last night 
with a crew for a bluenoser, but he'll be back 
here sometime this forenoon." 

When 1 told him about the cavalier recep- 
tion Mrs. Gallagher had accorded me half an 
hour earlier he laughed and said: 

"Don't let that worry you. You know 
what women are; no head for business. If 
Gallagher had been around it wouldn't have 
happened. He can smell a sailor a mile to 
leeward." 

By this time we had reached the house and 
I was duly introduced to Mrs. Gallagher by 
Dutch Harry as an old shipmate and "as good 
a sailorman as ever laid out on a yardarm." 
Explanations and apologies followed in due 
order, and in a few minutes I was busy put- 
ting away a breakfast that would have taxed 
the digestive powers of Paddy Eatabit. 

"Yez are the on'y wan in the house now." 
explained my hostess ; "so make yersilf at 
home." 

I promised her that I would, and as I felt 
drowsy after having eaten breakfast I made 
a beeline for the bunkhouse out in the back- 
yard, where I tumbled into a bunk and inside 
of a few minutes was sleeping sounder than 
Rip Van Winkle ever did in the whole of his. 
twenty-year nap. 

When I awoke the rain had ceased. Look- 
ing at the sky I could see the scud coming up 
from the westward, a sure sign of a brewing 
westerly wind with dry weather in its wake. 
What with this prospect and the refreshing 
sleep I had just had, my spirits rose like the 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



t^^* 



On the Atlantic Coast, 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions) 



*^^* 



NELSON OF THE NAVY. 



Admiral Walker, who is just dead, used 
to be called by his admirers in the Navy the 
"Nelson of the American Navy." There was 
this much of sense in the designation — that 
it expressed the belief that Walker had the 
ability and the pluck to win any sea fight 
against any enemy with any kind of a show, 
if he could have the show. However, this 
was mere admiration. Walker was more 
than an object of supposititious guessing; 
he was recognized as head and shoulders 
above any Navy Captain of his time. The 
good men believed this and sat at his feet. 
Among the good men we can count Robley 
Evans, Chadwick, Brownson, Stanton, the 
Rogerses — a lot of people of whom the 
Navy can be proud — while Dewey used to 
consult "old John" about Navy movements, 
and officers used to say that George would 
look into the glass and wonder what John 
would think of him now. 

He was a fine old sailor and he was recog- 
nized as thorough. No personal friendship 
softened his manners to a delinquent. One 
day when he was sailing out from Hamp- 
ton Roads with the international fleet that 
helped us celebrate the centennial of Wash- 
ington's first inauguration his orders about 
weighing anchor were disobeyed by his 
dearest friend in the service, who was in 
command of one of the ships, and as the 
old Chicago, the flagship, passed the trem- 
bling culprit the navies of the world heard 
"his Whiskers" thundering out from the 
bridge objurgations and expressing wonder 
at his own moderation is not putting his old 
comrade under arrest. At another time, 
when the "white squadron" was sailing out 
of a Mediterranean bay, another old friend 
worked his ship so awkwardly that the Ad- 
miral — then nearly a "trade-dollar Admiral" 
— suspended him by signal in the face of the 
whole fleet. The punished Captain, coming 
aboard to protest against his public repri- 
mand, puffed out, indignantly, "Why, sir, 
I never heard of such a thing." "Well," 
said John, pulling at his big side whiskers, 
"you've heard of it now." 

He had been a good fighter in the war, 
and he had most to do in starting the new 
Navy. He was literally the brains of the 
outfit. He put his stamp upon the best men 
in the service when he was chief of the 
Bureau of Navigation. He was a despot, 

but a mighty intelligent one. " him," 

said an officer who had to go to sea against 
his will, and who had pleaded in vain for 

some more shore service — " him, the 

worst thing thing about him is that he's 
always right." — Harper's Weekly. 



More wage claims have been filed against 
the passenger steamer Flora. First-Mate John 
Pender claims $260 and coal-passer Roy 
Fraser $6. Service along the Huron shore 
now is being given by the steamers Thew and 
Douglass. 



For union-label products consult the Jour- 
nal's ad columns. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



GRASP THE JAPANESE NETTLE. 



The official explanation of the anti- 
Japanese riots in British Columbia is non- 
sense. It may be true that "American labor 
unions" instigated the outbreak. But it does 
not follow that the attitude thus manifested 
is contrary to public sentiment. In fact, the 
reasonable conclusion is just the opposite. 

The plain truth is that English speaking 
white men, whether their allegiance be to the 
Stars and Stripes or the Union Jack, do not 
care to have any large number of yellow men 
in any country where the white men nave 
settled, made their homes and come to re- 
gard the land as their own. 

They do not want too many yellow men 
about them. They will not live with yellow 
men. 

This feeling of racial antagonism, preju- 
dice or what you will, is not beautiful. To 
entertain it is inconsistent with certain hu- 
mane sentiments and contrary to the spirit 
of religion. But, as we do not sell all we 
have and give to the poor, so we are not 
inclined to give way in our own country to 
those whom we do not like and who at home 
plainly dislike us. 

Probably it would be more consistent with 
many ideals for the white men of the Pacific 
Coast to move out and leave the country to 
the poor of Asia, who need it, but they will 
not do it, neither will the rest of the nation 
ask them to. 

In spite of all the preaching of a minority 
who are intellectually detached from the 
facts of life, the white men of the West will 
try to fight back the yellow horde. 

Governments are instituted to deal with 
the facts that move majorities rather than 
with the sentiments of intellectual minorities. 
The longer the settlement of the Japanese 
question is delayed the more trouble it will 
cause because there will be more Japanese in 
America. The way to safety is firmly to 
grasp the nettle. 

The men of this country are sure that they 
own it. So are the men of British America 
sure that they own that country. It is high 
time that the governments concerned faced 
their responsibility and quit playing with 
fire. — Chicago Inter Ocean. 



JAPANESE BAR COOLIES. 



The Kogoshima Railway Company has 
been ordered by the local authorities to dis- 
charge the Chinese coolies, hitherto em- 
ployed in the construction of the railway, 
on the ground that the employment of Chi- 
nese laborers is a violation of the regula- 
tions relating to Chinese, as created at the 
time when Count Okuma was the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs. These Chinese coolies 
have appealed to the Chinese Consul at 
Nagasaki that they are suffering from the 
sudden discharge and consequently the Con- 
sul reported the fact to the Chinese Minister 
in Tokio, who has approached the Japanese 
Foreign Office. The Asahi says that as the 
Foreign Office is not associated with the 
affair the Chinese authorities will probably 
open negotiations with the railway company 
direct to demand the money required by the 
coolies to return home. 



Fifty Chinese coolies arrived at Kobe by 
the steamer Nagata Maru from Tairen on 
September 1st, but were prohibited by the 
authorities from landing there. These Chi- 
nese laborers had been contracted to be 
employed for the Government Central Rail- 
way at the monthly wages of 15 yen, but 
their employment is recognized to be an in- 
fringement of the law, under which the 
Chinese coolies employed by the Kago- 
shima Railway Company were recently dis- 
charged. They will be also sent back home 
shortly. 

The fifty Chinese coolies, who arrived in 
the Kobe harbor from Tairen on September 
1st were allowed on the 2d to land in the 
sphere of mixed residences only. They put 
up at a Chinese inn, but were prohibited 
from going out of the building on the ground 
that their clothes were objectionable to the 
sight and, it was feared, might disturb the 
public peace. The company which con- 
tracted the employment of these Chinese for 
the Government Railway is chartering a 
steamer to send them back home.— Japan 
Gazette. 



BATTLESHIP'S DRESS SUIT. 



Few realize the number of flags carried 
by a war ship nor the cost of all the gay 
bunting which flutters from mast to mast 
at holiday time. In addition to fleet com- 
munication, necessary during maneuvers 
in home water, the ship must be equipped 
with an extensive array of flags stored on 
board for various forms of ceremonial and 
official occasions. This dress suit outfit of 
bunting consists of 250 different flags, the 
material and making of which cost just 
$2500. Each ship is entitled to a new flag 
equipment every three years, though owing 
to their constant use a flagship will often 
require a new set of signals in about a year. 

A great deal more time and labor is re- 
quired to finish certain of these flags than 
is generally supposed. The President's 
flag requires the longest time of any to 
make, as it takes one woman nearly a whole 
month to complete it. The life-sized eagle 
with outstretched wings and other emblems 
are all hand sewed and involve the most 
patient work. 

The most difficult to make are the foreign 
flags. This is especially true of the South 
and Central American ones. A half dozen 
specially skilled hand device sewers are con- 
tinually kept on these flags. Every battle- 
ship carries forty-three foreign flags, twenty- 
five feet by thirteen feet wide. The most ex- 
pensive ensign to make is the German, 
which, owing to the delicate scroll work of 
the large imperial eagle and royal crown 
necessitating delicate, slow and careful 
work, costs $56.50. The dragon flag of 
China consists of 200 separate pieces. 
Twelve to fourteen days are ordinarily con- 
sumed in finishing this flag, which costs 
$51.75. The flag of Siam with the huge 
white elephant costs $38. The Mexican, 
with its center design of a large eagle hold- 
ing a serpent in its bill, costs $39.50. The 
cheapest foreign flag is the Moorish, which 
costs $21. — Army and Navy Life. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Led by the Illinois Athletic Club, 
all clubs and societies in Chicago, 111., 
have begun a war of extermination 
upon the "tipping" evil. 

The directors of the United States 
Express Company on October 15 de- 
clared a semi-annual dividend of $3 
per share, compared with $2 for the 
same period last year. 

Governor General Grey of Canada 
has unofficially announced that mem- 
bers of the British royal family will 
visit Canada in connection with the 
centenary of the landing of Cham- 
plain. 

The Republican National Commit- 
tee will meet in Washington, D. C, 
on December 6 and 7 for the purpose 
of deciding upon the place and time 
for holding the next Republican con- 
vention. 

The report of the Commissioner of 
Tensions for the fiscal year ending 
June 30 shows that the number of 
pensioners in California was 26,448; 
amount paid them, $3,558,648; Nevada. 
1463; amount. $55,612. 

A tight between two Chinese in the 
Philadelphia Chinatown on October 
18 developed into a riot, the rival tong 
societies taking sides. Pistols and 
knives were freely used in the 
crowded quarters. 

The British steamers [ndravelli and 
Den of Ruthven have been chartered 
to convey Japanese from the Ha- 
waiian Islands. The former will sail 
in January for Vancouver and the lat- 
ter in March for Brazil. 

Tlu Supreme Court of the United 
States began its October term on 
October 14. The calendar contains 
481 cases, a considerably larger per- 
centage of business than at the be- 
ginning of any previous term. 

Immigration from Japan for Sep- 
tember was 1294, being a decrease of 
500 from last year. The total immi- 
gration from all countries for Sep 
tember was 98,694, being 3 per cent 
more than for 1906. Immigration for 
six months was 779,527. 

That the abandoned farms in New 
York and New England eventually I 
will be reclaimed and brought back 
to their primitive fruitfulness was the 
prophecy of James Wilson, Secretary 
of Agriculture, at a conference at 
Syracuse, N. Y., on October 23. 

Attorney-General Ellis, of Ohio, is 
after the alleged plumbers' trust. On 
October 21 he filed in the County 
Court a quo warranto suit against 
twenty concerns doing plumbing busi- 
ness in several Ohio cities or making 
supplies for plumbers. 

Dr. Walter R. Gillette, formerly 
Vice-President of the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, who was con 
vietcd at New York on October 24 of 
perjury and remanded to the Tombs, 
has been denied bail in the Supreme 
Court pending motions of appeal. 

The Nebraska State Railway Com 
mission has issued an order limiting 
the Missouri Pacific passenger trains 
to a speed of twenty-live miles an 
hour, the fast freight trains to twenty 
miles and the heavy freight trains to 
fifteen miles an hour, owing to the 
dangerous condition of the roadbed. 

On October 24 J. T. Henderson 
touched a gate at Sterling, 111., which 
thereupon raised, permitting the water 
to flow through the Illinois Missis 
sippi Canal. This marked the com 
pletion of the work on the $7,500,000 
Government undertaking which was 
started by Henderson twenty-five 
years ago. 



Cannon's Clothing" Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 
We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



Anderson, -988 
Anderson, -897 
Anelsson, Karl B 
Anderson. Charles 
Anderson 
Andersen 
Anderson 



-1305 
Albln 



Kulman, G. H. 

(Registered letter) 
Efrlstensen. Peter 
Kennedy, J. 
-1240 Kishl, Han; 



Anderson. -1118 
Andersson, Patrick 
Brusbard, 1402 
Behrens, F. 
Bortrom, Wm. 
Bade, Alex. 
Benson, Ray 
Bouton, Eugene 



Karlson, Gustaf 
Kcrmagoret, Anatel 
K. . k, Albert 
Lindow, E. 
I.ukkimu, Mr. 
I..n.I. Gu8 A. 
Lutter, Franz 
Lindholm. Nestor 
Luekman, Thorwald 
Larsen, A If. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOES 



ALL STYLES AT 



LIPPMAN BROS. 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Bloin, Ch. A. -1166 Larsen. P. -1179 
Bedford, Arthur Larsen, Eivind 

Bundesen, Jens Louis, Coadon 

Brander. W. -138»Louncke, A. -1321 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



trag, John K 
Bee, Colin 
Bergersen, Alf. 
Benieu, John E. 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
ilergstrom, Frann 
Blom. Filip 
Urussel, Edward 
Jrlngager, A. II. 

finh, Borge 
Carlson, G. .\. 



Lewis, John 
Larsen, Axel 
Lindholm, C. 
Lorentzen. Kilmer 
Lurulstedt, C. 
Lindroos, Askar A. 
Laine, Frank 

iff. Sylvian 
Maack, Hans 
Markman, H. 
Martinson. August 



:arlson, C. E. -903Martin, John B 
Christiansen. LudvlgMalmbei;,- 



IVI 



B RO W IN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OB THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



:GISTE 



him. 



Miller, James 
i.l. lining YV. 
McDonald, N. 
Maibohm, Hans 
Munroe. H. G. 
McLeod 

Mikkelsen. B. -1445 
Mannitrom. W. 
Mattson. J . 
Miller, James 
Magel, Fred 



Christensen. M. 

Cohrt, Herman 

Collberg, Chas. 

Cliristoffersen, A. 

Coeeine, Louis 

Christiansen, -901 

Cooley, J. H. B. 

Corre, Pierre 

Carnaghan, Wm. 

Cook, Harry 

Carlson, Aksel 

Christensen, Christ Malmqvist, J. 

Carlson, Waldemar Martyn, Leroy 

Chamberlin, L. C. Mi.rmussen, Carl E. 

Christensen, Ludwig Mikkelsen, Peter 

Panielsen, Hans H. Monterus, John 

Damdanl, Alesandro Mikkelsen, A. S. 

Dittmer, Otto Nass, Paddy 

Danielson. Gustav . .ilson, Daniel 



Dunwoodie. H. 
Dahlberg, J. 
Eliasson, Edward 
Bkeland, Sigurd 
Eggers, John 
Edelhagen, P. F. 
Ericson, Johan 
Folvig, J. A. 



Nilson, -737 
Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Nilsen, N. A. -734 
Neilsen, George 
Nilsen, Peter 
Neerheim, Th. P. 
Nordin. M. 
Neilsen, W. 



Kriedrikson, Andrew Nystrom. Ragnar 
Forstrom, Oskar Osterhais, R. 



Fernberg, Gustaf 
Garder, Oscar 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Goethebeur. Ch. 
Gallen, Paul 



Olsen, Guttorn 
Olsen, N. 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olson, W. -668 
Olsen, A. -759 



Gundersen, Andreas Oysteth, S. 



Gallen, R. 
Guerin, Le Port 
Gunmanreu., John 
Guff, Steve 
Giiel. Bernhardt 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Georges. Angela 
Gustafsson, J. E. 

Helman, J. G. 



Osterhuls. J. 
Paulsen, -606 
Petterson, Axel 
Petersen, Charley 
Paris, Walter 
Petersen. C. -721 
Pedersen, L. -1321 
Pettersen, K. E. -9*3 
Pedersen, -896 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO., 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 
Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 
Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Penney, Mathem 
Persson, J. L. -921 
Petersen, E. -101 
Person. A. -1192 
Folge, L. ' 
Perleny, Emil 
1'orter, Chas. 
Piedvache, Emile 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer In 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street. 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO. 



HANS HENRICKSEN 

City Express 

STAND ON FRONT STREET. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



i Registered letter) Pettersen, 1943 
Haaleni itter, Karl Pedersen, Alf 
HelJal. Karl G. 
Henning, Gustav 
Hansen, Harry 
I laker. Matt 
Hansen, Chas. E. 
Holltl, John W 
Hoi man, George M. 
Heesehe. Heinrlch 
Haldorsen. Herman Pederson, John 
Ilohman, H. Perkins. D. H. 

Hansen. -1073 Pedersen, Jack 

Henriksen, Hans Rauen, W. 
Hansen, Hjalmar Runge, Helrich 
Hohman, Carl -1767 Reulund. Andrew 
Hansen, Christian Rheinhard. Wilhelm 
nansen, F. Rush, Fred 

(Registered letter) Richardson, H. E. 
Hansen, -K54 Rytha. M. O. 

Helms, W. (Reg. letter P. O.) 

(Registered letter) Runge, H. 
Henrldes, G. Reay, Stephen A. 

liaison, J. A. Rasmussen, R. 

Hansen, L. Rice. Patrlc B. 

Holmstrom, CharlesReynolds, Thomas 
Ha Worsen, -595 Rash, H. 

Herman, Fied Renolds. August 

lllllsen, Halvor Smith, Aksel F. 

I'en.iriksen. G. H. Schaffler. A. 



FOR FURNISHED CABINS 

GO TO 

ALEX. MUHLBERG 

370 3d STREET, bet. Centre and Mesa 

$1 per Week or $3 per Month and Up 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



liansen. Chr. F. 
Hudson, Mat 
Iversen, John 
(Package) 



(Reg. letter P. O.) 
Scarborda, Mario 
Smith. Axel 
Sorensen. -1664 



Johannesen. Hans H.Singer. J. 
Johansen, Albert Samuelsen, Otto 
Johansen, F. W. Soto, Pedro 
.'ohansen, C. M. -159ISoderstrom, O. 
Jungjohan, John Sanders, Charles 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for Union Made Cloth- 
ing, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots 
and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 
Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
Ent., Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



FRED SVENDSEN 

■ * * » ■ 

UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



Johansson, Nils 
Jensen. P. -695 
Johansson, -1576 
Jensen, -734 
Johansen, G. 
Junker, Paul 
Johnson, John 



Stahn, M. 
Sorensen, Michael 
Svensson, Ture 
Schmidt. Alfred 
Scheel. Johannes 
Schmidt, F. 
Sleen, Hans 



Johannesen, A. -1557 Schannon, H. C. 
Johansen, A. F. -1287Sverkesen, L. C. 
jensen. H. -1311 Schulz, Chris 

Johansen, Theodor Schmidt, E. 
Johnson, -1281 
Jensen, Chris 
luhnke, William 
Johansen, 1364 



1670 
Selzer, M. 
Samrlo, S. 
Svedstrup, E. 
Sverkesen, 1 ou 



Johnsen, J. -1050 Svensson, Nleolaus 

lenssen, J .Kristen Strandqvist, Louis 

Johanssen, Aug. F. Schatze. Otto 

Jensen, -734 Svendren. -1050 

lohnsen, Alf. Staff. Louis 

Johansson. Hjalmar Skugstad, Christian 

lorgensen, Walter Salberg, Oskar 

Johansson, N. Aug. Tyrholm, Johan 

■ohansen, -1462 Thompson, Stephen 

Jobnsen, Gust. Tobiason. Johan 

luansen, Hans Tlngleman, IC. 

Jensen, Peter Tillman, Andrew 
Johansson, -1486 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Johansson. H. 
..'onsen. -1412 
Johansen, 1287 
Jensen, P. 



Tipp. Joseph 
Torgersen, R. 
Ulke. E. 

Underhlll. Geo. A. 
Voreland. G. K. 



Anderson, -906 
Andersson, A. H. 
Askerlund, Daniel O. 
Anderson, S. 
Andersson, Adolf 
Ardelean, J. 
Absolonsen, Ole M. 



Andersen, Gustaf 
Aaquist, Thorvald 
Arnesen, Karl A. 
Albertsen, Johannes 
Andersen, P. -858 
Andersson, -1229 
Antonsen, MarluB 



i Registered letter) Williams, R. E. 
Jansson. K. G. Weiss. Charles 

lohansen. Carl Wahlers, W. 

Johanson. -1452 Wordehoff, Alfred 

Johanssen, A. -1557 Westin, J. A. 



Khncstrom, G. 
\'ii stein John 
Kruse. Ed. 
Klinthorn, Martin 
Karsberg, C. 
Kamp, G. H. 



Wilson. J. 
Washburn, Thomas 
Widos, Stefan 
Winseus, Peter 
Yetwel, Fred 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The British steamer Queen Christina went 
ashore at Point St. George, Cal., during a fog 
on October 19, and it is feared will be a total 
loss. 

United States District Judge Dole, at Honolulu, 
T. H., on October 19, awarded Henry Withoff, 
formerly first-mate of the barkentine Fullerton, 
$17,500 damages for the loss of an arm. 

The overdue German ship Louise, bound from 
Bremen and Geestemunde to San "Francisco, ar- 
rived at Hobart, Tasmania, on October 25. The 
Louise was out 136 days and was quoted at 12 
per cent for reinsurance. 

It is announced that the Nippon Yusen Kaisha 
has decided to renew steamship service between 
Yokohama and Valparaiso. This service was 
formerly given by the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, but 
that company recently abandoned it. 

A telegram from Rio Janeiro states that the 
new steam-schooner Olsen and Mahoney, which 
broke down on her way from Baltimore to San 
Francisco and put in to Rio Janeiro for repairs, 
is expected to sail again in a few days. 

The overdue shio Dirigo, which had been out 
142 days from Honolulu, bound for Delaware 
Breakwater, arrived at her destination on October 
24. The Dirigo had been for some time on the 
overdue list, and was quoted for reinsurance at 10 
per cent. 

The Los Angeles (Cal.) Chamber of Commerce 
fortification committee has drawn up an appeal 
to Secretary of the Navy Metcalf, asking that 
steps be taken for the fortification of San Pedro 
harbor. A memorial setting forth the need of a 
heavy battery along the shore will be sent to 
Washington. 

From information received at San Francisco 
on October 25 it appears that the Oriental liner 
Empress of China, which sank at her dock at 
Vancouver, B. C, on the 23d, has been raised and 
has suffered hardly any damage. There were 
only about 600 tons of flour on board when the 
steamer heeled over. 

A telegram from Sydney, New South Wales, 
dated October 21 says that the French bark 
Pierre Antonine, bound from London for San 
Francisco and Puget Sound, was obliged to put 
into Sydney through stress of weather. The 
Pierre Antonine lost her sails and had her rigging 
damaged in a hurricane. 

The barkentine Centennial, Captain Stindt, ar- 
rived at San Francisco on October 25, from 
Alitak, Alaska, with 44,600 cases of salmon for 
the Alaska Packers' Association. The Centennial 
occupied twenty days on the passage. Captain 
Stindt reports meeting with heavy weather off 
Alaska and togs all the way down the Coast. 

Great anxiety is being felt among shipping men 
regarding the fate of the American ship Adolph 
Olrig, which left New York 203 days ago for San 
Francisco with a valuable cargo of general mer- 
chandise. Nothing has been heard of her since. 
Her rate for re-insurance has risen to 15 per 
cent. It is feared that the Adolph Olrig has been 
lost at sea. 

The owners of fifteen of the steam-schooners 
on the Coast have expressed themselves as be- 
ing dissatisfied with the present agency and other 
arrangements that at present exist for dealing 
with freight, and intend to make new arrange- 
ments, especially as regard the San Pedro trade. 
A definite announcement is expected in the course 
of a few days. 

A telegram from Coos Bay conveys the infor- 
mation that the tug Columbia returned to that 
port on October 25 from the schooner Novelty, 
which was previously reported ashore on the 
beach near Umpqua River. The Novelty is high 
and dry on the beach and will become a total 
loss. The tug did not attempt to tow the 
schooner off. 

The Redstack tug Sea Rover sailed from San 
Francisco for Coos Bay, Or., on October 22, to 
bring down the steam-schooner Bowden. The 
Bowden was recently launched and is the latest 
addition to the steam-schooner fleet on the Coast. 
She goes into the trade immediately and will 
carry lumber. She belongs to Captain Tiboits of 
San Francisco. 

It has been decided not to cut the steamer Spo- 
kane in two, as was intended with a view to 
lengthening her. The Pacific Coast liner will run 
one more trip up North before relieving the Po- 



mona. When the Spokane returns from Seattle 
she will take the place of the Pomona in the Eu- 
reka trade for two trips. The Pomona will go 
into dock for repair. 

The Nippon Yusen Kaisha liner, Aki Maru, at 
Seattle, Wash., from Japan, brings confirmation 
of the story that the Nippon Yusen Kaisha will 
put a line of twelve steamers between the Pacific 
Coast and Europe. The boats will be operated in 
opposition to the Kosmos liners. The vessels 
will touch at the principal South American ports, 
San Francisco, Victoria, B. C., and Seattle. 

The contract for overhauling the steamer In- 
diana has been awarded to the Moore & Scott 
Iron Works, of San Francisco. The Indiana, 
of San Francisco, formerly belonged to the 
Barneson-Hibberd Company, but is now the 
property of the Pacific Mail Company. The re- 
pairs to the Indiana will occupy two months and 
a large staff of workmen will be engaged. 

The final touches for preparing the steamer 
Acapulco for further usefulness on the Panama 
route were given at Hunter's Point drydock on 
October 26, when, after an examination of her hull 
to ascertain whether she had sustained injury 
when she sank on August 26 at the old Mail dock, 
she was cleaned and painted. It was ascertained 
that the hull of the Acapulco was uninjured. 

The engineers of the Oceanic liner Mariposa, 
whose licenses were revoked by the Local In- 
spectors at San Francisco on October 22, for 
negligence of duty aboard that vessel when she 
broke down at sea two weeks previously, will 
appeal to Captain John Bermingham, the Su- 
pervising Inspector. The engineers claim that 
the penalty is too severe and that there; was not 
sufficient cause to warrant it. 

The visit of E. O. Faulkner, the Santa Fe's tie 
expert, to Honolulu in search of tie timber has 
raised a rumor there that the Santa Fe people 
are negotiating with the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany for the purchase of the steamers Sierra, 
Sonoma and Ventura. At the Santa Fe offices in 
San Francisco the report is denied, although it is 
admitted that such action might be taken if it 
was found that a large supply of railroad ties 
could be obtained in Hawaii. 

Following is the reinsurance list as posted at 
San Francisco on October 25: Thomasina, 177 
days from Fort Erie for Falmouth, 6 per cent; 
Silberhorn, 185 days from Newcastle, Austra- 
lia, for Pisagua, 60 per cent; Arthur Sewell, 206 
davs From New York for Seattle, 21 per cent; 
Adolph Olrig, 199 days from New York for 
San Francisco, 10 per cent; Glenogil, 170 days 
from Liverpool for San Diego, 10 per cent; Lau- 
riston, 127 days from Tumbry Bay for Falmouth, 
6 per cent. 

The United States Local Board of Inspectors, 
at San Francisco, in a decision on October 22, 
fixing the responsibility for the break-down of 
the Oceanic liner Marioosa at sea, revoked the 
license of R. M. Grundell, chief-engineer, for the 
unexpired time of its issuance; suspended the 
license of William Holland, first-assistant- 
engineer, for a period of six months, and revoked 
the licenses of D. Gardner, second-assistant-en- 
gineer, and W. V. Sackett, third-assistant-en- 
gineer, for the unexpired time of their issuance. 

Bloom Brothers have filed, a suit in libel against 
the Pacific liner Acapulco in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco to recover dam- 
ages to goods ruined by water when the Acapulco 
sank at her dock on August 26 last. Bloom Broth- 
ers delivered to the ship 200 gunnies of flour. 3 
packages of candy, 7 cases of fruit and 2 cases 
of oysters, valued at $1125. The goods were to 
be shipped to San Salvador. Bloom Brothers 
paid freight on the flour, amounting to $105, 
which they claim has never been refunded. They 
seek to recover damages to the extent of $1230 
and costs. 

Delayed in loading the biggest cargo which has 
ever been consigned from San Francisco to Aus- 
tralia, the British steamer Aeon, of the Australian 
mail and cargo line, sailed on October 27. The 
Aeon loaded 1,000,000 feet of lumber in Seattle 
before she started loading her San Francisco 
cargo for Sydney and Auckland. She has now 
on board 1,500,000 feet of lumber and 4000 tons of 
additional freight, including nine carloads of min- 
ing machinery from Denver, a tremendous quan- 
tity of salmon from the northern fishing stations 
and forty-one tons of mail matter. Although the 
Aeon is taking a record cargo, she left hundreds 
of tons of goods behind, which will be picked 
Up by the Quito when she sails on November 22. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



For guaranteed oil clothing and Gold Seal, 
snag-proof boots, call on D. Edwards, 4 Mission 
St., around corner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an of- 
ficer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



WM. 



H. FRAZIER, 

1%A Lewis St. 



Secretary -Treasurer, 
Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 



ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. T., 51 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 85 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va„ 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
ST. JOHNS, N. B., General Delivery. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 242 Spring St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies. 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 East Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y. t 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 22 Fifth Ave. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 417 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR, Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Mgr. 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week, 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' t'nion of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, S:in Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1907. 



LEGAL-AIDERS EXPOSED. 



Several weeks ago the Journal referred 
to the charge aimed at the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific by President Von Briesen, of the 
Legal Aid Society, of New York City, which 
charge amounted to an accusation of col- 
lusion between the Sailors' Union and the 
crimps on the Pacific Coast. Such a charge 
would ordinarily be entitled to nothing 
more at our hands than that silence which 
speaks contempt. But the Legal Aid So- 
ciety, not content to disparage the Sailors' 
Union, proceeded to arrogate to itself credit 
for entire devotion to the seamen's interests. 
more at our hands than that silence which 
was duly administered in these columns. In 
the interim the seamen of the Atlantic 
Coast have been reflecting upon the facts 
concerning the work of the Legal Aid So- 
ciety. The Journal is in receipt of certain 
correspondence on the subject, which is 
herewith reproduced, as follows: 

Editor Coast Seamen's Journal: 

I notice in the issue of September 25 an edi- 
torial on tlie Legal Aid Society of New York, and 
also its accusations against the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific, so, for your further information, I 
herewith inclose a copy of the proceedings of a 
City Court of the City of New York, in a case in 
which the complainant, a seaman, first applied to 
the Legal Aid Society for assistance, and was 
refused. The Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
then placing the matter in the hands of its attor- 
ney, Mr. Hardy, found upon going into court, that 
the Legal Aid Society (Branch for Seamen), was 
representing the officer accused and later con 
victed for a brutal assault upon the seaman, 'the 
records of the court tell the story better than I 
can. and how much the seamen of the Atlantic 
( !i iast benefit by this & iciety. 
Fraternally yours, 

WM. II. FRAZIER, 
Secretary Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union 
Boston, Mass., October 18, 1907. 



CITY COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW 

YORK. 
OSCAR HELSTEN, 

Plaintiff, 

against 
JOHN WILLIAMS, first officer of the Schooner 
"Mary L. Crosby," 

Defendant. 
Statement of Proceedings in Case. 
This was an action brought in the above Court 
for an assault, and for an assault and battery 
committed upon the person of the plaintiff by 
tin- defendant, on the high seas. The action was 
begun in the above Court under its jurisdiction 
as a Marine Court, December 1st, 1903. On De- 
cember 2nd, 1903, the defendant was arrested by 
the Sheriff of the County of New York and 
brought before the Court for pleading. He was 



admitted to bail in the sum of five hundred ($500) 
dollars by Mr. Justice Conlon, and the trial set 
for the 7th day of December, 1903. On the said 
day the case was tried before Mr. Justice Conlon 
and a jury, and the jury disagreed. On the 8th 
day of December, 1903, the case was again tried, 
before Mr. Justice O'Dwycr and a jury, and a 
verdict rendered in favor of the plaintiff and 
against the defendant for two hundred ($200) 
dollars, together with costs amounting to one 
hundred and thirty-live and 30-100 ($135.30) dol- 
lars. On December 9th, 19(13, a judgment for 
three hundred and thirty-five and 30-100 ($335.30) 
dollars was duly entered. 

Thereafter an execution against the property 
of the defendant was issued by the Sheriff and 
returned unsatisfied. Thereafter, and on or about 
the 8th day of March, 1904. an execution against 
the person of the defendant was issued and served 
and the defendant was confined in Ludlow street 
jail under such execution for a period of three 
months. 

The defendant was represented throughout the 
entire proceedings by the Legal Aid Society of 
the City of Xew York ( Branch for Seamen), the 
attorney of record in the action being Rosalie 
Loew Whitney, who was at that time the attor- 
ney for the Legal Aid Society. Arthur V. Briesen, 
Esq., of 49 Wall Street, was at that time the 
I 'resident of the said Society and the attorneys in 
charge of the Branch for Seamen were Franklin 
drier. Esq., and Richard D. Currier, Esq. The 
above case was conducted by Mr. Currier. 

Dated, October 14th, 1907. 

ROY M. HARDY, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 

The foregoing speaks for itself, and is the 
strongest possible refutation of the preten- 
sions of the Legal Aid Society as the 
guardian angel of the seamen. It appears 
that that body would do well to confine its 
claims within the limits of "business," to ad- 
mit, in short, that it is in business to afford 
legal aid to whichever side has the best case 
— and the most money. 



Q >MPULSORY ARBITRATK >\. 



The idea of compulsory arbitration may 
be considered a "dead one" in British labor 
circles. As usual, that idea was brought 
forward in the recent British Trade-Union 
Congress, with the usual result. The figures 
given in the report of that body, as reprinted 
on page 1 of this issue, show that the pro- 
posal was rejected by a majority of 660,000 
votes. That is to say, the vote in favor of 
compulsory arbitration was 153,979, in a 
total of 1,627,958. Stated in its briefest 
terms, the idea of compulsory arbitration 
was defeated more than ten to one. A sim- 
ilar result has befallen the same plan in 
previous conventions of the same body. In 
the convention of 1906 compulsory arbitra- 
tion was defeated by a majority of 92,000 ; in 
the convention of 1905 the majority against 
was 486,000. The comparatively small vote 
against the plan in 1906 was due to a com- 
promised, or rather complicated, proposi- 
tion, thus leading many organizations to 
vote for compulsory arbitration, with the 
distinct understanding that it should not be 
applied to themselves. Whenever the 
proposition of compulsory arbitration has 
been placed squarely before the British 
trade-unionists, it has been overwhelmingly 
defeated. 

Taking into consideration the develop- 
ments in those localities in which compul- 
sory arbitration has been put into actual 
practice, the results are, if possible, more 
decisively prejudicial to that plan. Allowing 
for the natural indisposition of the compul- 
sory arbitrationist to admit the failure of 
his panacea for the prevention of industrial 
disputes, the facts in the case of Australia 
and New Zealand clearly indicate, and in- 
deed prove, a state of extreme disappoint- 
ment and dissatisfaction with that plan. 
The widespread discussion of proposals to 
amend the Arbitration laws, and in some in- 
stances to abolish them, forecasts the ulti- 



mate abandonment of the system and a re- 
turn to the more practical, if more primitive, 
method of securing results. A review of the 
whole situation in this respect justifies the 
statement that the compulsory arbitration 
propaganda is distinctly on the wane. Now- 
adays no one in labor circles mentions the 
subject but to flout it. Of course, there is 
an exception to this rule, as to all others — 
an exception that proves the rule. For in- 
stance, our contemporary Progress, of Buf- 
falo, N. Y., suggests the substitution of com- 
pulsory arbitration for the trade agreement 
now so common and so efficacious in the re- 
lations between employer and employe. Our 
contemporary says: "The practical and 
sensible tiling to do is to follow the ex- 
ample of the wise solons of New Zealand 
and prevail upon Congress to enact a Com- 
pulsory Arbitration law, enforce it, and the 
country will then have industrial peace in 
fact and not in theory." Talking about Xew 
Zealand reminds us of a news item, appear- 
ing in the "World's Workers" column of 
this issue of the Journal, to the effect that 
certain slaughtermen in New Zealand were 
recently fined for striking in violation of an 
arbitration award. "A lot more of them 
would have been fined, but they went out of 
reach of the court." In other words, the 
striking slaughtermen were forced to flee 
the country in order to escape the penalty of 
their offense (?). Any system that makes 
fugitives of men whose sole offense is a re- 
fusal to work under conditions disagreeable 
to them is repugnant to every conception of 
liberty, and needs but to be exposed to be 
incontinently rejected. The strongest argu- 
ment against compulsory arbitration is pre- 
cisely that presented by the "wise solons of 
Xew Zealand." We feel certain that our con- 
temporary. Progress, and all other compulsory 
arbitrationists will agree with us as soon as 
they have learned something about the real 
workings of that plan. 



Seattle (Wash.), October 13. — Six marine 
firemen attempted to desert the Xorwegian steam- 
ship Admiral Booreson while the boat was coaling 
for a trip to Taku, China, with 3,300,000 feet of 
rough lumber for railroad construction. The 
marine firemen were beaten back aboard the 
steamship by the first mate and held below 
deck until the Booreson sailed to-night. 

While the Booreson was in San Francisco two 
of her firemen deserted, and at Portland the entire 
stoke-hole crew quit the ship. A new force of 
firemen was signed at Portland, and six of these 
men tried to get away to-day. — Press Dispatch. 

Here we have an example of the conditions 
prevailing under the flags of foreign nations. 
These conditions are strongly reminiscent of 
"slavery days." Fortunately such conduct as 
that of the Xorwegian bucko in the case here 
noted is by no means as common as it once 
was. For this change the seamen's unions are 
mainly responsible. The good work thus 
begun and carried on successfully will be con- 
tinued until the last vestige of involuntary 
servitude is destroyed ; until the seaman, no 
matter what flag he sails under, will be as- 
sured against the violation of his person in 
every port of the United States. 



The best form of opposition to Asiatic labor 
is that which is aimed at the products of said 
labor. Demand the union labels of those 
crafts which come into direct competition 
with Chinese and Japs, such as the Cigar- 
makers and Garment Workers. 



Do your shopping before 6 p. m. on week- 
days and before 10 p. m. on Saturdays and 
the evenings preceding holidays. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A. F. of L. ON INJUNCTIONS. 



The American Federation of Labor has 
issued a notice to its affiliated bodies, urging 
that action be taken to oppose all candi- 
dates for legislative and judicial offices 
whose record on the injunction question is 
unsound. The notice is as follows : 

American Federation of -Labor. 



Washington D. C, October 12, 1907. 
To All Organized Labor, Greeting: 

All thinking men inclined to fairness and 
justice realize the abuse of the injunction 
process as administered by judges in courts, 
and this, too, of the municipal, State, as well 
as the Federal courts. All labor has been 
compelled to give this subject its deepest 
consideration and concern. 

The Conventions of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor have frequently dealt with 
this: subject and sought relief. The last 
Convention of the A. F. of L., held at Min- 
neapolis, Minn., unanimously adopted the 
following: 

"There is no tendency so dangerous to 
personal liberty, so destructive of free in- 
stitutions and of a republican form of gov- 
ernment as the present misuse and extension 
of the equity power through usurpation by 
the judiciary; and we therefore urge the 
speedy enactment of the Pearre (Anti-In- 
junction) bill into law, and we further 
recommend that candidates for legislative 
or judicial positions be carefully investi- 
gated as to their past acts and interrogated 
as to their position on this matter before 
they be given any support, and that those, 
who from their actions or their expressions 
are deemed unsound, be, regardless of any 
other question, repudiated." 

In view of elections being held in several 
parts of our country for both legislative and 
judicial offices, it is submitted that it is the 
duty of our fellow workers to take the 
initiative and necessary action as will carry 
the purpose of this unanimous expression of 
organized labor into effect. 

Inclosed you will find copy of the Pearre 
bill upon which candidates for judicial or 
legislative office should be pledged, repudi- 
ated or opposed. 

Sincerely hoping that prompt and effect- 
ive action in the interest of labor and jus- 
tice to all may be taken, we are, 
Fraternally yours, 

Samuel Gompers, President. 
Attest : 

Frank Morrison, Secretary; James Dun 
can, First Vice-President; John Mitchell, 
Second Vice-President ; James O'Connell, 
Third Vice-President; Max Morris, Fourth 
Vice-President ; D. A. Hayes, Fifth Vice- 
President; Daniel J. Keefe, Sixth Vice- 
President; Wm. D. Huber, Seventh Vice 
President ; Jos. F. Valentine, Eiglith Vice- 
President ; John B. Lennon, Treasurer, Ex- 
ecutive Council, American Federation of 
Labor. 

By order of the Minneapolis Convention 

of the A. F. of L. 

A BILL 

To regulate the issuance of restraining orders 
and injunctions and procedure thereon and to 
limit the meaning of "conspiracy" in certain 
cases. 

Be it enacted, etc., That no restraining order or 
injunction shall be granted by any court of the 
State of , or a judge or the judges 

thereof, in any case between an employer and an 
employe, or between employers and employes, 
or between employes, or between persons em- 
ployed to labor and persons seeking employment 



as laborers, or between persons seeking employ- 
ment as laborers, or involving or growing out 
of a dispute concerning terms or conditions of 
employment, unless necessary to prevent irrepar- 
able injury to property or to a property right of 
the party making the application, for which injury 
there is no adequate remedy at law, and such 
property or property right must be particularly 
described in the application, which must he in 
writing and sworn to by the applicant or by his, 
her, or its agent or attorney. And for the pur- 
poses of this Act no right to continue the relation 
of employer and employe or to assume or create 
such relation with any particular person or per- 
sons, or at all, or to carry on business of any 
particular kind, or at any particular place, or at 
all, shall be construed, held, considered, or treated 
as property or as constituting a property right. 

Sec. 2. That in cases arising in the courts of 
the State of , or coming before said 

courts, or before any judge or the judges thereof, 
no agreement between two or more persons con- 
cerning the terms or conditions of employment 
of labor, or the assumption or creation or ter- 
mination of any relation between employer and 
employe, or concerning any act or thing to be 
done or not to he done with reference to or 
involving or growing out of a labor dispute shall 
constitute a conspiracy or other criminal offense 
or be punished or prosecuted as such unless the 
act or thing agreed to he done or not to be done 
would be unlawful if done by a single individual, 
nor shall the entering into or the carrying out 
of any such agreement be restrained or enjoined 
unless such act or thing agreed to be done would 
be subject to be restrained or enjoined under the 
provisions, limitations, and definition, contained 
in the first section of this Act. 

Sec. 3. That all Acts and parts of Acts in con- 
flict with the provisions of this Act are hereby 
repealed. 



Seamen should make it a point of honor, 
as seamen, as trade-unionists and as men, to 
demand the union label of the United Gar- 
ment Workers of America when purchasing 
suits, oilskins, overalls and other articles of 
clothing. Such action will greatly aid the 
men and women employed in the clothing 
industry to maintain decent conditions, and 
to drive the Chinese and sweatshop products 
from the market. Seamen, help those of 
your own kind and color ! 



When purchasing smoking material — to- 
bacco, cigars, etc., see that the union label 
is on the goods. For fac-similes of labels 
(originals printed in blue) see Journal's ad 
columns. 



For fair products of all kinds, consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



The steel steamer John W. Moore, which 
was sunk in a collision with the steamer Queen 
City in the Detroit River recently, is said to be 
a total loss. The wrecked boat has been aban- 
doned to the underwriters, who are repre- 
sented by Worthington & Sill of Buffalo. The 
Moore was owned by F. M. Osborne, of Cleve- 
land, and she is loaded with coal. The wreck 
is in thirty-three feet of water, and the divers 
who examined her say that her keel from the 
stern is pushed back under the pilot house. 
The Moore was built by the Craig Shipbuild- 
ing Company, of Toledo, in 1890. She is 246 
feet keel and 40 feet beam. 



FOUND. 

A silver case watch in the Sailors' Union Hall 
at San Francisco. Apply to Secretary. 

DIED. 

Carl A. I lermanson, No. 1371, a native of Fin- 
land, aged 29, died at Silver City, Idaho, Oct. 
22, 1907. 

Julian Peter Adolf Jensen, \'i>. 1733, a native of 
Denmark, aged 2^, died at Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 

20, 1907. 

.Allen B. Ogle, No. 866, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, aged 59, died at Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 

21, 1907. 

Fred Fredriksen, No. 287, a native of Norway, 
aged 30, died at Fort Stanton, N. M., on Oct. 
19, 1907. 

Ililmar Julius Hansen, No. 14 r )9, a native of 
Norway, aged 28, died at Fort Stanton, N. .M., on 
Oct. 19, 1907. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 28, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., A. Seaman presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull. Leave of absence was given 
to Ed. Andersen, A. Furuseth and W. Macarthur, 
who will leave on November 4, for the conven- 
tion of the American Federation of Labor, at Nor- 
folk, Va. E. Ellison was elected Secretary pro 
tern. John Tonnesen was elected Assistant Secre- 
tary pro tern. P. Scharrenberg was elected Treas- 
urer pro tern. Voting for delegates to the con- 
vention (jf the International Seamen's Union of 
America was proceeded with. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
Shipping good; prospects fair; men scarce. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
3004 McCarver St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping and pros- 
pects fair. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
114 Quincy St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
Shipping medium 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 20, 1907. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain; men scarce. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 21, 1907. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 14, 1907. 
Shipping slack; prospects better. 

J. T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 24, 1907. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping quiet, plenty of men ashore. 
Voting for delegates to the convention was pro- 
ceeded with. The Shipwreck Benefit was ordered 
paid to Nick Udfolk, wrecked on the "Rita New- 
man." 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

51 Steuart St. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 17, 1907. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 17, 1907. 
No meeting; shipping good; few men ashore. 
CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III.. Oct. 21, 1907. 

Shipping fair during week. Nominations were 
made for delegates to the International Conven- 
tion. 

WM. PENJE, Secretary. 

143 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y„ Oct. 17, 1907. 
Situation fair. 

DANIEL SULLIVAN, Secretary. 
15 Union St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 22, 1907. 
Shipping slack. 

H. P GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



^^^* 



WRECK OF THE CYPRUS. 



C. J. Pitz, the surviving second mate of 
the steamer Cyprus, which was lost on Lake 
Superior recently, has returned to Cleveland. 
In his statement to the attorneys of the Lack- 
awanna Steamship Company Pitz said that 
the Cyprus turned turtle after shipping some 
water, which shifted her cargo, causing her to 
list. She was laboring along in the trough 
of the sea with waves washing over her when 
Pitz was called from his hunk late in the aft- 
ernoon. Her hatches were fastened with pat- 
ent hatch fasteners, but no tarpaulins were 
used. 

( >n noticing the condition of the boat, Pitz 
said, lie suggested to the first-mate that the 
boat be either put before the wind or headed 
into it, but this was not done and shortly aft- 
erward she was headed for the beach. The 
wind and sea increased and gradually the ves- 
sel listed until she finally turned turtle and 
went down. 

A Duluth dispatch contained the follow- 
ing relative to the wreck : 

"Captain Joseph Kidd has returned from 
Deer Park, where he went to inquire into the 
foundering of the Cyprus and to ascertain 
whether anything was possible to be done to- 
ward locating the wreck. He said that in ad- 
dition to the bodies a quantity of wreckage, 
including the interior fittings of her cabins, 
bad come ashore. In regard to the absence 
of tarpaulins to batten down her hatches, it 
was said that none were furnished to the Cy- 
prus ; that the new style hatch covers were 
considered to be quite watertight and that 
there was nothing on many of the new boats 
to which a tarpaulin could be attached. 

"The case of the Jones was quoted as to 
patent hatches. Two years ago her cargo 
shifted in a heavy gale while near the Apostle 
Islands and she made Ashland, where she was 
trimmed and put in shape. Her captain sent 
a letter to the makers of the Mulholland hatch, 
with which she was fitted, praising it, but all 
the same lie told his brother skippers that he 
shipped so much water that his ship became 
almi >st unmanageable." 



ONTARIO PURCHASES LURLINE. 



It was learned recently that the Ontario 
Government has purchased for $10,000 the 
private yacht Lurline from T. Harrington 
Walker, of Walkerville, Ont., and that the 
boat will be used in the fishery protection 
service, Captain Forrest, of Walkerville, will 
command the vessel. 

The Lurline -was built in 1888 at a cost 
of $20,000 and is well known in the Detroit 
River, where she runs every day in the sum- 
mer season, usually going back and forth 
between Peche Island and Detroit and 
Walkerville. She carries a crew of five to 
six men. The Vigilant has heretofore 
guarded the interests of the Canadians on 
Lake Erie, and it is not known whether 
it is intended to reinforce her or to use the 
Lurline elsewhere. 



The Josiah G. Munroe, building for the 
Frontin Steamship Company, was launched 
at Ecorse on October 19. She is 552 feet over 
all. 56 feet beam and 32 feet deep. 



DEVELOPMENT AT DULUTH. 



Duluth, Oct. 16.— "We have under con- 
sideration enlargements of our dock system 
and improvements in the facilities for handling 
coal at the head of the Lakes that will call for 
approximately $1,000,000 outlay. We are in- 
specting our properties here in a general way, 
and with special reference to these proposed 
improvements. Final decision will be made by 
our company after our return to the Fast. It 
is expected that early action will be taken in 
this matter." 

The foregoing is, in brief, the substance of 
an interview with M. II. Taylor, President of 
the Pittsburgh Cord Company, largest in the 
world, that has six docks at the head of the 
Lakes, two in Duluth and four in Superior. 
Mr. Taylor and other officials of the coal com- 
pany are guests at the Kitclii Gammi Club and 
will spend several days at the head of the 
Lakes. 

"We aim to be in a position to afford the 
greatest possible dispatch for boats," said Mr. 
Taylor. "To accomplish this we must have 
ample and the most efficient equipment to be 
obtained. Time is money in the coal business 
as in all other lines of endeavor. 

"Generally speaking, the facilities for han- 
dling freight at Duluth-Superior are unequaled 
anywhere. The head of the Lakes is a great 
gateway for commerce and coal always be one 
of the great items of business. Our company 
fully realizes the fact that the commerce here 
will develop rapidly in the future as in the 
past, and we expect to keep pace with mod- 
ern facilities for handling coal." 



TO FLOAT THE GALATEA. 



Tlie wrecking steamer Favorite having 
abandoned for the time being the task of re- 
leasing the stranded schooner Galatea, 
ashore at Grand Marais, Captain W. C. 
Davidson, a tugman at that port, has of- 
fered to float the craft for $600. His propo- 
sition is under consideration. It was not 
until she had tried for two months to get the 
vessel off the beach that the Favorite gave 
up the work for the winter. 

The Galatea lies in sand, and almost as 
fast as channels were dredged up to her they 
would be filled again by the slightest sea 
from any quarter. However, in spite of this 
hardship, the schooner has been moved 
Lakeward some seventy-five feet. But the 
fall gales commencing, the prospects of 
floating the vessel this year became dubious 
and all operations were suspended until 
spring. In the meantime Captain Davidson 
has submitted his proposition and expresses 
confidence that by a method he has in mind, 
one somewhat different from that given a 
trial, he could accomplish the release of the 
vessel before the close of the present season. 



The steamer Wm. A. Hawgood, building 

for the Atlas Steamship Compnay, was 
launched at South Chicago yards on October 
19. The Hawgood is 552 feet over all, 532 
feet keel, 56 feet beam and 31 feet deep. She 
will have triple expansion engines and Scotch 
boilers. The new vessel, which will go into 
commission on November 2, will be operated 
by W. A. Hawgood & Co. 



OLD TIMERS ON LAKES. 



Cornelious Gilmore, an old time Lake 
mariner, while in a reminiscent mood, told 
recently of the old days when full rigged 
schooners were the pride of our merchant 
marine. After gazing out of the dock office 
window to watch the big steamer D. R. 
Hanna load about 12,000 tons of coal, he 
said : 

"I was in the sloop Peoria, in 1856, with 
Captain William Wells, when we came 
through the Soo with about 375 tons of ore, 
which broke the cargo record by a big 
might. It took us four and one-half days to 
load at Marquette. We unloaded in the old 
river bed in Cleveland in five days. All old 
timers remember the wooden buckets, 
hoisted by horse power. 

"We got $7 a ton for that cargo. 

"In 1857 I was on the Mary Elizabeth 
Perew. She carried about 475 tons and 
about 14,000 bushels of grain. I remember 
distinctly of our laying in Milwaukee for 
three weeks because we could not get more 
than thirteen cents a bushel for wheat to 
Cleveland. Our skipper finally took a load 
from Chicago to Cleveland for seventeen 
cents. 

"A sailor had to be one in those days. 
During the three last trips in the fall we 
received $5 a day, but like true sailors, we 
spent it." 






SHIPPING OF DULUTH. 



Duluth claims to be the greatest shipping 
port in the world, greater than London, 
Liverpool, or any other than New York. 
The total freight handled by water during 
the year 1906, at Duluth, Superior and the 
subport of Two Harbors, .which is included 
within the Duluth district, the United States 
I'ureau of Statistics reports was 37,376,213 
tons, while the total tonnage of London for 
1905 has been given as 33,478,158; Liver- 
pool, 24.365.519; Hongkong, 22,653.616; 
Hamburg, 20.762,000, and Antwerp, 19,675.- 
660. 

The tonnage of New York for 1906 was 
30,314,062; that of Chicago was 14,740.115. 

It should be said, however, that 80 or 85 
per cent of the freight handled at Duluth is 
raw material, iron ore, wheat and coal, 
which is carried in vast quantities by a large 
fleet of vessels. 

The value of the freight shipped from and 
received at Duluth last year was more than 
$250,000,000, and every ounce of it was a 
contribution to the wealth of the world. 



Surfmen Warren Whitman and Emery Hc- 
bert have resigned from the Middle Island 
Life-Saving station. This is the third resig- 
nation from this station this season. The Life- 
Saving and Lighthouse Keeping services are 
in need of men at the present time. The wages 
in all the other branches of the work have been 
advanced with the higher rate of living, but 
in these two they have remained the same. 
In the case of the Lighthouse service, the scale 
of wages was set twenty years ago and has 
n<>t been advanced since, hence the shortage 
of men. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



NOTICE TO MASTERS. 



The United States Lake .Survey steamer 
General Williams, which is engaged in sweep- 
ing the west end of Lake Erie, reports the re- 
location of the schooner Magnet, lying three 
miles N. E. by E. y 2 E. (true bearing) from 
Middle Sister island. 

Sweep wires stretched twenty-six feet be- 
low water surface, at present stage, passed 
over the wreck without striking. The least 
depth found was 27.5 feet. The water over 
the wreck is therefore good and the vessel 
track clear. 

The ake Survey sweeping operations of this 
season, both in Lake Erie and Lake Huron, 
have shown that the wrecks of many years 
ago, even where they were leveled for the 
twelve or fourteen-foot drafts of the early 
days, are still obstructions dangerous to twen- 
ty-foot navigation. 

It is the purpose of the Lake Survey to 
sweep over all the wrecks of the Lakes, where 
they lie in depths likely to make them danger- 
ous, in order to safeguard vessels from disas- 
ter by leveling these obstructions for future 
drafts. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



A total of 590,947 tons of anthracite was 
received at Milwaukee up to October 1. 



The car- ferry Ann Arbor No. 1, recently 
condemned by the United States Inspectors, 
will be rebuilt. 



In the month of September 254 boats ar- 
rived at Detroit docks from Canada and 237 
cleared for Canadian ports. 



STURGEON BAY CANAL. 



Physicians all along the Lakes will inspect 
boats on which typhoid fever cases have de- 
veloped within the season. 



The steamer Lake Shore, which sank the 
steamer Pabst at Port Huron recently, has 
gone to the Lorain shipyard for repairs. 



The crew of the sunken steamer John W. 
Moore were given new suits of clothing and 
their wages in full before leaving: Detroit. 



Fourteen members of the Lake Seamen's 
Union now are receiving treatment in the De- 
troit Marine Hospital. This is the greatest 
number from that organization in the present 
season. 



The steamer F. B. Wells, which was dam- 
aged by running onto her own anchor while 
entering Ashtabula, left that port on October 
18 for Lorain, to go into dry dock. The anchor 
is still on the bottom of the Lake in the path 
of incoming boats. 



Captain Harris W. Baker, of Detroit, has 
been awarded the contract for raising the 
sunken steamer Case at Amherstburg. He will 
start to work at once, and he hopes to have 
the vessel up in a few days. Wrecker Baker 
will get about $2,500 for the job. 



The steamer Adriatic, the fifth of the fleet 
built at the Lorain yards for the Lackawanna 
Steamship Company, was launched on Satur- 
day, October 19. She is a sister-ship of the 
lost steamer Cyprus, and is 440 feet long, 52 
feet beam and 31 feet deep. 



The working of deepening the Stur- 
geon Bay Canal to twenty-one feet is about 
completed. It has been carried on by Uncle 
Sam for several years, and cost hundreds 
of thousands of dollars. The canal, which 
connects Lake Michigan with Green Bay, is 
now navigable by the largest Lake traffic. 
The deepening of the canal is an important 
event to the commercial interests of the 
western shore of Green Bay. In fact, it is 
second in importance only to the digging of 
the canal. All across and down the Lake 
traffic to and from Green Bay, Menominee 
and Marinette, is through the canal. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Daniel Miley is requested to write to his 
mother, Mrs. Pat Miley, R. F. D. 2, Decker- 
ville. 



William Smith is requested to write to 
his sister, Mrs. Lot. Beeks, at Mannsville, 
N. Y. Important! 



We Don't Patronize. 



John Murphy would like to hear from 
his brother, Dan Murphy, now on the Pa- 
cific Coast. Address John Murphy, 1244 
Main street, Cleveland. 



Geo. F. Smith, 193 Pearl street, Hartford, 
Conn., inquires for his brother, James 
Smith, No. 15,040, Lake Seamen's Union. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Bro- 
ther Smith please communicate with above 
address. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6081. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, ONT., CANADA Box 235 

KINGSTON, ONT., CANADA. ... (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 699 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 610 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich, ,", 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, Wer- 
thelm & Schiffer, of New York City; Manufacturers 
of The Henry George and Tom Moore cigars. 

Flour — Washburn-Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Valley City Milling Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

Whiskey— Finch Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

CLOTHING. 
Clothing— N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. ; B. Kuppen- 

heimer & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company, manufacturers 

Kabo and La Marguerite Corsets. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Henry H. Ro»- 

lof & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shirts and Collars— United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y. ; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y. ; James R. Kaiser, 

New York City. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders— Boorum & Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Printing — Hudson, Kimberley & Co., printers, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo. ; W. B. Conkey & Co., publishers, Ham- 
mond, Ind.; Times, Los Angeles, Cal.; Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Philadelphia Bulletin. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick— Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of 
Chicago, 111.; Corning Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta 
Company, Corning, N. Y. 

Cement— Portland Peninsular Cement Company, Jack- 
son, Mich.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Ce- 
ment Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 
Carriage and Wagon Builders— S. R. Baily & Co., Ara- 
esbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Brown & Sharpe Tool 
Company, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery 
Company, Turner's Falls. Mass.; Henry Disston & 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; New York Knife Company, 
Walden, N. Y. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of Car- 
pentersville. 111.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Lincoln Iron Works (F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company), Rutland, Vt. ; Erie City Iron 
Works, Erie, Pa.; Singer Sewing Machine Co., Eliz- 
abeth N. J.; Pittsburg Expanded Metal Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa.; American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul. 
Minn.; Standard Sewing Machine Company, Cleve 
land, Ohio; Manitowoc Dry Dock Company, Manito 
woe, Wis. 

Stoves — Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo.; 
United States Heater Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gur- 
ney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; Home Stove 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind.; Bucks Stove and Range 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags— Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster Com- 
pany, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, Circle- 
ville, Ohio; Merkle- Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 111. 

Fibre Ware — Indurated Fibre Wire Company, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio^ O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Beaters — Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. 
J. Keeley, New York City; F. W. Rauskolb, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lumber — Reinle Bros. & Solomon. Baltimore, Md.; St. 
Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Tacoma, 
Wash.; Gray's Harbor Commercial Co., Cosmopolis, 
Wash. 

Leather — Lerch Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. 
(Raymond Paper Co., Raymondsville, N. Y. ; J. L. 
Frost Paper Co., Norwood, N. Y.). 

Wall Paper— William Bailey & Sons, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Com- 
pany, Sag Harbor; T. Zurbrugg Watch Case Com- 
pany, Riverside, N. J. 

Wire Cloth— Thos. E. Gleeson, East Newark, N. J.; 
Lindsay Wire Weaving Co., Collingwood, Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Bill Posters— Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio; A. Van 

Buren Co., and New York Bill Posting Co., New 

York City. 
Hotels — Reddington Hotel, Wllkesbarre, Pa. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy— Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

Its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
ihomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



EDUCATION IN GERMANY. 



The important task of spreading whole- 
some literature and useful knowledge is. as 
a matter of fact, not sufficiently performed 

by the splendid libraries for which men like 
Mr. Carnegie are never tired of providing 
the funds. With all due appreciation for the 
generous gifts offered in our days by the 
wealthy classes of the old and new world, 
we may point out that these libraries are 
naturally confined to the larger towns and 
the universities. The real want of the first 
means of self-education is, however, not felt 
in these places, but in the villages and the 
open country. Here help can not be brought 
by some magnificent foundations, but by the 
patient, unpretentious and indefatigable 
work of generations. It is this kind of work 
for which the Society for Spreading Popu- 
lar Knowledge has been organized in Ger- 
many. 

Its founder was the late member of Par- 
liament, Herr Heinrich Rickert, and it is now 
presided over by Prince Heinrich Schoen- 
aich-Carolath. a poet of some distinction. 
This society has taken up the programme of 
bringing appropriate literary treasures of the 
whole world within the reach of ihe popu- 
lation in the villages and smallest towns. 
For this purpose it uses either already ex- 
isting little libraries of elementary schools 
and village clubs or founds libraries of its 
own. Thus, in 1906, altogether 421 new 
village libraries, with 22,147 volumes, were 
started, while 4881 already existing libraries 
were presented with. 96,302 volumes. 

Most important for its purpose is the plan 
of lending a collection of books to a village 
for a year only, until all persons living there 
may have had a chance of reading the of- 
fered books of their liking: then the whole 
set is brought to another village, while a 
new collection takes its place. This trav- 
eling collection interchanged between many 
villages consists of 80,000 volumes; so 
that there is variety enough for a life- 
time. It consists of novels, poetic literature 
and fiction exclusively. 

\v ;i new venture another traveling library 
composed of popular works on science was 
set moving in 1906, and it was found out, 
that at least in the larger villages and small 
towns there is a sufficient demand for scien- 
tific literature to be highly satisfied with the 
result. Many towns that are sufficiently 
provided for with a circulating library for 
works of fiction, apply for the lending of the 
traveling scientific library, as their means 
do not allow them to include this branch of 
literature in the purchases of their own li- 
brary. For the sake of children the society 
has adopted the plan of arranging a small 
exhibition of children's and juvenile litera- 
ture in the villages. Great care is taken to 
include only wholesome books at reas' li- 
able prices. 

Moreover, the society arranges public lec- 
tures and literary entertainments even in 
the remotesl villages. Lately it has taken 
up the publication of little pamphlets treat- 
ing of practical questions. The first install- 
ment was a treatise. "Hqw to preserve good 
health and the power of making one's liv- 
ing," by Professor Kalle and Dr. Schellen- 
berg. Up to now 80,000 copies have been 
distributed in the open country. In the list 
of contributors toward the expenses of this 
society we find also the name of the German 
Emperor. 



Other associations of a similar kind try 
to use the organization of the German bo. >k 
trade for selling good reading at the lowest 
possible prices. Quite recently the "Ger- 
man fund for the memory of poets" has in- 
augurated the plan of providing the works 
of living authors at prices that hardly pay 
for the printing expenses and binding. — Con- 
tinental Correspondence. 



BRITISH SOLDIER IN INDIA. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



As the writer stood and meditated there 
came the sound of marching feet. The Som- 
ersets were coming to service. Their win- 
ter uniforms had been served out and they 
wore not drab-colored khaki, but the historic 
scarlet: and as they swung along they 
looked a Splendid body of nun. But the eye 
presently recognized in their equipment one 
odd feature. They were breaking into sin- 
gle file and marching through the church 
doors, but every man carried his rifle and 
wore his ammunition pouch. Where else 
within the British dominions does the Brit- 
ish soldier appear armed at church parade? 
lUit this is the rule in India, and the usage 
dates back to the Mutiny, and is one of its 
memorials. The original plot of the sepoys 
was to rise when the British troops were 
in church ami unarmed. The plot went 
wrong, as it happened; but ever since, by 
way of precaution, British troops in India 
appear with rifles and ammunition pouches 
at church parade. And to see the red-coated 
Somersets, with rifles on shoulder, swinging 
round the angles of the historic entrench- 
ments, and passing into the Memorial 
Church equipped as for the firing line, was 
something more than, a dramatic memorial 
of the great peril of bygone days. It was a 
concrete proof that in the judgment of the 
men who are responsible for India the pen' 
is not quite over. 

But there arc other significant precautions 
taken in India which betray the conscious- 
ness that Great Britain holds India by the 
title of the sword, and must keep its sword 
keen and bright. At Lucknow stands the 
ruined, shot-torn residency, mute witness of 
ancient strife; but if another mutiny oc- 
curred the scanty force upholding the Brit- 
ish flag in Lucknow would not need to im- 
provise hasty defenses in a garden. The 
great barracks to-day are really armed posts, 
capable of resisting everything except the 
tire of heavy guns. They are so placed as 
b cover each other with their fire, are armed 
with quick-firing guns and are kept in con- 
stant readiness for seige. The railway sta- 
tion itself is covered by defensive works, 
and the same precautions are taken prac- 
tically on all the great military stations. The 
lessons of the Mutiny have burned them- 
selves in deeply on the official imagination. 
The very structure of the native army it- 
self reflects, it may be added, the same idea. 
The proportion of native troops to British 
force in India is not allowed to exceed two 
io one. The artillery is all British; the fort- 
resses are held by white regiments. Only 
light batteries of mountain guns arc in 
native hands. The rank and file of the na- 
tive regiments have inferior rifles to the 
British rank and file. Not even the desire 
to make the native army formidable against 
a foreign invader makes the authorities blind 
to the risk that the army may become too 
formidable against its own creators. — Dr. 
W. H. Fitchett in London Tribune. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. Wash., 3004 MeCarver St. 
SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. Wash., 114 Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, Or.. 51 Union Ave. 
EUREKA, Cal., P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, Cat., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU. H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEAT7 E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cat.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Or.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Or. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
Any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

A. G. Oberg, No. 744, a retired member of tbe 
Sailors' Union of tbe Pacific, is inquired for by 
C. E. Roberts, 44-46 East street, San Francisco. 

Edward Bodey, born in Brixton, near London, 
England, aged about 54, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Bror Henry Wllhelm Clausen, a native of Do- 
derhults, Forsamlin, Sweden, born 1880, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

August Martcll, a native of Finland, aged about 
47, last heard of on the Pacific Coast about IS 
years ago, is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

C. J. Carlson, a native of Helsingborg, Sweden, 
aged about 47, last heard of at San Francisco 
about 8 years ago, is inquired for by his mother. 
Any one knowing bis present whereabouts please 
address Mrs. Hokeson, Ferndale, Wash. 

Ivar Walter Lindblom, native of Finland, last 
heard of at Ketchikan, Alaska, about a year ago, 
is inquired for by his parents, also by his brother 
Albert. Address, 696 Fulton, or Carpenters' 
Union No. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 50, and 
Johan Bernard Anderson, aged about 47, natives 
of Halmstad, Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, 16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland avenue, 
San Francisco. 

Lewis, or Louis, Albion, sailing on the Pacific 
Coast as master-mariner for a number of years, 
and supposed to have died in 1898, at about the 
age of 80, is inquired for. Any one having any 
information regarding the above please commu- 
nicate with Coast Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



SHANGHAIING A CRIMP. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



mercury in the dog days, and I felt good 
enough to hold my own against a dozen 
Dutch Harrys with a couple of Gallaghers 
thrown in for good measure. 

Going into dinner I found that Gallagher 
had returned from Savannah. He was a big, 
lanky, rawboned man, apparently fifty years 
old, dark and evil-looking. He greeted me 
civilly enough, however, and after dinner gave 
me a dollar with the injunction to go and 
"blow" myself. This I did, rushing the can 
with such assiduity that both Gallagher pere 
and Madame Gallagher mere were soon in. the 
very best of humor. 

After supper I went out for a walk. Some- 
how I made for the shed where I had sought 
shelter that morning. There I sat me down 
again as I had before, and fell to thinking of 
the day's happenings. In the midst of my 
reverie I was aroused by someone shouting 
in a loud, cheery voice : 

"Hello, Bill; what yer doin' here? On the 
beach like meself, eh? Well, we never died 
in the winter yet — did we Bill? Come on'n' 
have a drink." 

The speaker was "Redtop," a whilom pack- 
et-rat, whom I knew slightly as a hangeron 
around the Cob Dock saloon on the Bowery 
in New York, a favorite resort of sailors. He 
had evidently been drinking, for he was nearly 
three sheets in the wind, with the fourth tow- 
ing over the side. More to humor him than 
anything else I went with him. 

"D'ye know," he began presently, with the 
gossipy garrulity of the half tipsy, "that I 
made five bucks to-day just as easy as rollin' 
off a log. Fact, I tell you." 

"How was that?" I asked. 

"Went and shipped in the Romeo to go 
from here to Buenos Ayres and from there 
around the Horn somewhere. Two months 
advance." 

"Are you going in her?" 

"Goin' in her?" he repeated in astonish- 
ment ; "not for Joe. Why, man alive, she's a 
floatin' slaughterhouse. She came here one 
man short ; the mate drove him overboard. 
The crew's been locked up every night in the 
foc's'le to keep 'em from running away. Be- 
sides, whoever goes in her will never get a 
cent, for I heard the skipper blowin' his ba- 
zoo in at the shipchandler the other day, sayin' 
that he never paid a crew off in his life." 

"Who paid you the five dollars ?" 1 asked. 

"Gallagher. He tells me he's got a likely- 
looking chap in the house he's goin' to put in 
her. For my part, I wouldn't go in her for 
a thousan' bucks a month." 

This news made me disinclined for any 
more booze, so I shook "Redtop" and went off 
on a tack by myself. I now began to per- 
ceive what I was up against. Gallagher and 
Dutch Harry were in a conspiracy to trick 
me on board of the Romeo, trusting to my 
supposed ignorance of her evil reputation for 
the success of their scheme. But I would fool 
them both. I would go to bed early to-night, 
and towards morning skip out and make for 
Jacksonville. 

At nine o'clock, therefore, I turned in for 
the night. About two or three in the morn- 
ing, as nearly as I could judge, I awoke and 
reached for my clothes, intending to dress and 
get out. They were gone, as were also my 
shoes. 

"Trapped, by God !" I said to myself. 
"Well, there's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip; 
I'm not on board of the Romeo yet." And 



with that crumb of comfort I turned over and 
went to sleep again. 

At daybreak I was called by Dutch Harry, 
who brought me my clothes. He explained 
that he had hung them in the kitchen over- 
night to dry. 

"I say," he began presently, "that Demerara 
trader I told you of yesterday got loaded 
quicker than I expected. She is ready to sail 
this morning, so you'd better get up an' get 
ready for her. The captain will sign you 
right on board." 

"What's the name of the bark?" I inquired 
casually, as I was dressing. 

"Romeo," he replied ; "as good a ship as 
you've ever been in. Why, some of the chaps 
have been in her four or five years. I want- 
ed to go in her myself, but Gallagher wouldn't 
let me." 

I pretended to fall in with the scheme read- 
ily. To have pursued any other course would 
have been worse than useless under the cir- 
cumstances. If I had bucked, Gallagher 
would simply have produced the ship's arti- 
cles, had me arrested, and sent on board under 
police guard. A sailor's status in the South- 
ern States at that time was very much the 
same as that of a negro slave in ante-bellum 
days. I knew, partly from personal experi- 
ence and partly from other sources, that the 
crimps and the local authorities in nearly 
every Southern port had a working entente, 
generally dividing the profits from the traffic 
in sailors. 

Besides, I was mad clear through by this 
time at Dutch Harry's duplicity, and I vowed 
to get even with him at any cost. The vessel 
was anchored about a mile and a half below 
the city, well out toward Saint Simon's light, 
and I knew that Dutch Harry would pull me 
on board of her. My plan was, when we got 
down past the city, to take the tiller of the 
boat and give him the beating of his life, and 
then compel him to put me ashore somewhere. 
To be sure, he was a pretty tough customer, 
but I knew I had the "Indian sign" on him 
since the beating I gave him in Antwerp. 

After a hurried breakfast in the kitchen I 
was taken into the baggageroom and fitted 
out with a bag of second-handed duds, a straw 
bed, a bar of soap, and a bottle of whiskey, the 
whole worth at most $4 or $5, but appraised 
by Gallagher at $35 odd. Dutch Harry shoul- 
dered the bag, and away we went to the boat, 
bound for the Romeo. After we were well 
past the last dock I got ready to knock him 
over the head with the tiller and make my 
escape ; but, of a sudden, I had an inspira- 
tion which appealed to my sense of the fit- 
ness of things with such force that I could 
not resist the temptation to act upon it, al- 
though the doing so involved considerable 
risk of miscarriage. 

By the time I had fully made up my mind on 
this point we had gotten to within half a mile 
or so of the vessel. The wind was now blow- 
ing a stiff breeze from the westward, and she 
was evidently preparing to sail, for the Blue 
Peter flew at the fore and her topsails were 
hanging in the bunt gaskets ready to be 
sheeted home and hoisted at a minute's no- 
tice. The crew, also, were heaving on the 
windlass, and I could hear them shantying — 
in a rather feeble way, I fancied — the familiar 
strain : 

"Blow, boys, blow, for California; 
There's plenty of gold, so I've been told, 
On the banks of Sacramento." 

Presently we were alongside of her. 

"Go up on deck and hand me down a rope's 



end, and I'll bend on your bag for you," said 
Dutch Harry. 

"No, you go," I said ; "I feel too infernally 
sick from that rotgut whiskey Gallagher gave 
me to do much pulling just now. Besides," 
looking up at the sails, "I guess I'll have 
enough pulling to do before the day is over." 

"All right," he responded with a grin, "any- 
thing to oblige an old shipmate. I know 
how you feel for I've 'been there,' me boy." 

Away he clambered up the sideladder with 
the painter in his hand. As he did so I saw 
the mate, a big, hulking fellow, coming aft. 
Soon Dutch Harry sent me down a rope's end 
and I bent on the bag. When he had pulled 
it up almost to the rail I whipped out my 
knife and cut the painter. As the boat drift- 
ed astern with the tide I sung out to the mate, 
pointing to Dutch Harry: 

"There you are, Mr. Mate; there's your 
man. Keep your eye on him. He's a slick 
guy and needs watching." 

"All right," grunted the mate with a leer on 
his ugly mug that boded no good to Dutch 
Harry. 

Just what Dutch Harry said to the mate I 
was too far away to hear, but the next instant 
I saw the mate knock him down and jump on 
him in true bucko fashion. In less time than 
it takes to tell it he had kicked Dutch Harry, 
bag and all, off the poop down on to the 
main deck. What happened afterward I am 
unable to relate, for I was too busy paddling 
for the shore to take any notes. That night 
I rode the "blind baggage" on a fast express 
bound for Jacksonville, Fla., where, a few 
days later, I managed to ship myself on a 
schooner going to Havana. 

I have noticed that no properly written story 
is ever complete without an epilogue in which 
due justice is meted out to the various villains 
in the cast. And so I have to record that 
Dutch Harry turned up all right in Buenos 
Ayres. Afterward he married an Argentine 
woman with some money, and set up a sailor's 
boardinghouse of his own in Rosario. He 
was eventually stabbed to death by "The Jack 
o' Spades," a notorious beachcomber in those 
parts, whom he had tried to shanghai around 
the Horn. Gallagher was shot and instantly 
killed, about a year after I boarded with him, 
in a dispute with a rival boardingmaster over 
a hapless sailor whom both claimed. And 
thus endeth this veracious yarn. 

Hawserlaid Bill. 



SUING FOR FREIGHT. 



The Ionia Transportation Company has 
brought action against the Lehigh Valley Coal 
Company in the United States District court 
at Duluth to recover $2,721 which the trans- 
portation company claims as freight arrearages 
and damages caused by delay in unloading a 
cargo. 

The libelant claims that the Ionia, a steam 
freighter chartered by the Lehigh Valley Coal 
Company to haul a cargo of coal from Buffalo 
to Houghton, Mich., was delayed without cause 
by the coal company for nine days, and al- 
leges that the earning capacity of the boat for 
those nine days would have been $2,250. The 
libelant also claims $471 still due in settle- 
ment of the freight charges on the cargo of 
coal. 

In response to the claims the Lehigh Valley 
Coal Company offers to settle the freight ar- 
rearages and the costs involved in the action, 
but denies the allegation that the boal was 
detained unnecessarily for nine days. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



The passive resistance railroad 
strike' inaugurated at Vienna, Aus- 
tria, recently, was ended on October 
13. 

Most of the New Zealand miners 
are protesting against the Govern- 
ment's proposed amendments to the 
Arbitration Act. 

A number of Melbourne (Australia) 
painters have ceased work because 9s. 
a day was refused them by employers 
who are making a big profit out of 
their labor. 

An unknown friend recently lodged 
£50,000 in a Berlin bank to the credit 
of the representatives of the Copper 
Workers' Union, to assist the mem- 
bers of the union who are on strike 
for better conditions. 

Hotel keepers at O. K., in the Chil- 
lagoe (Australia) district, were recent- 
ly persuaded by white Australians to 
get rid of their Asiatic cooks. The 
yellow cook was paid at the rate of 
£2 10s. a week, but white cooks now 
E4. 

The Rritish Trade Union Congress 
has demanded that the Government 
shall cause a searching inquiry to be 
held regarding the shooting by the 
military of the union men who were 
on strike for better conditions at Bel- 
fast, Ireland. 

In the Xew Zealand Arbitration 
Court recently, twenty-eight more 
slaughtermen, concerned in the strike 
which took place in February last, 
were fined £5 each. A lot more of 
them would have been fined, but they 
went out of reach of the Court. 

A deputation from the Brisbane 
(Australia) Journeymen Bakers' Un- 
ion waited <>n the Queensland Home 
Secretary recently, and requested that 
the Health Act be amended in the 
direction of relieving them of respon- 
sibility for light-weight bread. 

As an outcome of the Howard 
(Australia) miners' lockout a prospec- 
tus has been issued of a proposed 
Burrum Co-operative Coal Mining 
Company, with a Capital of £15,000. 
divided into 30.000 shares of 10s. each, 
all of which are contributing. 

Relations are strained, almost to 
striking point, between the Master 
Carriers' Association of Sydney. Aus- 
tralia, and the Draymen's and Trol- 
leymen's Union, owing to the unrea- 
sonable attitude of the former in the 
matter of an agreement arranged at 
a conference. 

The mining production of the Aus- 
tralian Commonwealth last year was 
represented by £7.831,187 in West 
Australia, £7,912.716 in Xew South 
Wales. £4.198.647 in Queensland, 
il 3.454.856 in Victoria, £2.257,147 in 
Tasmania, and £977.063 in South Aus- 
tralia, making a grand total of £26,- 
731,616. 

The strike of slaughtermen at 
Lake's Creek. Rockhampton. has been 
settled amicably through a conference 
between the secretary of the union 
and the manager of the meat works. 
The agreement, which the union ar- 
ranged in the interests of the em- 
ployes, has been fully maintained, and 
all hands have returned to work. 

The report of the Navigation Com- 
mission, submitted to the Australian 
Federal Parliament, recommends that 
no person shall be employed on any 
vessel registered in Australia who is 
not a British subject, and thoroughly 
conversant with the English language; 
further, that all subsidized foreign 
ships should be prohibited from par- 
ticipating in the Australian coastal 
trade. 



THE H. A. SCHWARTZ CLOTHING HOUSE 

Succeuor to SAWTELLE'S 

307 SECOND STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SEAMEN'S WEARING APPAREL 

A complete line of Union Made goods in Clothing, Hats, Furnishing Goods, Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Boots,. Etc. Agents for W. L. Douglas Shoe-$2.00 to $5.00--Union Made. 
Give us a call. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not called or sent for. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled 
Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 
Promptly delivered and shipped 
to anv part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <fc YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda. 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 





SMOKE 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the 


'Lit- 


tie 


Beauty,' the "Princess" 


and 


other high grade union-madec 


gars. 




Manufactured by 






C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street, Eureka 


Cal. 



Adami, Joseph 
Aga. Johan 
Akesson, H. 
Allendsen, H. 
Albers, G. 
Albertsen, J. 
Amundsen, A. 
Amnell. A. 
Anderson, A. M. 
Anderson, E. -1149 
Anderson, H. M. 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Victor 



Helenius, K. 
Henning, L. 
Hikellct, E. 
Hill, G. 
Hagberg. W. 
Howell, A. S. 
Hoglund, F. V. 
Holti, J. W. 
Honde, P. 
Holmstrom, O. 
Hustide, H. 
Hultberg, E. J. 
Ingebretsen, John 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rate*. 

Front Street, between C and D. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Anderson, L. T. -736 Ingebretsen. Karl 
Anderson, Hjalmar Ingalls, W. L. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

15.00 PER WKEK. 

Neatest and Cleanest Place In Town. 

CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. 

Union Label Goods. 

A. ROSENSTEIN, Prop. 

23 N. Third St. Portland, Ore. 

Phone Clay 685. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Andersen, Fritzof Kruhming, A. 
Andersen, Geo. Chr. Lassen, Th. 



Andersson, A. 
Arras, Moritz 
Blaskh, Mike 
Bartols, Otto 
Behrens. Emil 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bluhrn, Peter 
P.oose, Paul 
Bauwens. Edemon 



Lindstrom, Emil 
Larsen, F. -1113 
Lyche, Harris M. 
Lindeman, A. 
Langvardt, Christian 
Lang, G. 
Le Fevre, Louis. 
Lange, F. 
Lettre. Honore 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Henson. John T. -143Maack, Hans 

Bergh, ivlw. 

Calson, Oscar 

Da hi, John 

l lalton, Thomas H 

Drenan, A. E. 

Eriksen. E 

Kbiers, Henry 

Wiving, Gust 



Matson, Viknor 
Marks. B. W, 
Nelson, Chns. 
Nilsen, Edvin 
Nordstrom, Knut O 
Nurmi, E. W. -865 
Nurminen, J. V. 
Olsen, Andy -754 



Engbrethsen, Daniel Olson, Albert 



Elia^sen. O. E. 
Frost. Hans 

Vicktor B. 
Griel, Rernherdt 
Keniicks, Goss 
Hansen, Hans Ch. 
Herrmann, E. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Harrald 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, George 
Hanson, Aldan 
Haagensen, Martin 
llartman, Karl 
Ivers, John 
Jakobsen, <~,ie 
Jacobsson, John 
Jnnsen, Haral L. 
Johannessen, Hans Smith, Max 

H. Smith, H. 

Jaensen, Hans Tyrholm, Johan 

.Tanson, Os< ar Thomson, John 

Johansen, F. B. Tornbeck, R. 

Johanson, A. J. CJdd, John 

Kri^loflersen, Emil Vincent, Joseph 
Kaderhecht. Alf Wanous, Geo. A 
Karlsson, A. M. Wilsen, Anders 

Kaufold, E. Waltner, M. 



Olson, Olat 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Ordig, Bruno 
Patterson, John 
Pettersen, Harold 
Pettersson, Gustaf E. 

-1018 
Petersen, Ed. 
Peterson, Mauritz 
Rusk, C. H. 
Rasmassen, Adolph 
Rosbach, Walter 
Raetz. Aug. 
Rosenvold. Isak 
Russell, Ed. 
Selander, Gus. 
Btaaf, Louis 
Swanson. Ivar 



Chas. A. Pragge.Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 
Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank. 

PORT TOWNSEND. WASH. 



Good shoes, hats, genuine Stock- 
ton f.annel underwear — union label — 
square dealing, right prices. D. ED- 
WARDS, 4 Mission St., around cor- 
ner Sailors' Union Hall, S. F. 



Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen, -1520 
Apps, P. 

Appelqulst, O. T. 
Arnesen. Martin 
Aspen, K. D. 
Austin, M. M. 
Bateman, S. J. 
Berg, Albert 
Bernard, S. 
Belin. Erik 
Bensen. F. 
Pernert. F. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bensen. J. E. 
Berg. H. M. 
Ree. Colin 
Berkelund. R. 
Blndsell. W. 
Bllllngton. J. M. 
Biornholm, H. 
Blecka. A. 
Rlomberg. G. 
Rotgerelst, L. 
Boose, P. 
Bratrud. O. M. 
P.raa. P. O. 
Rrunstrom. G. 
Bronelew. W. 
Brewer. W. 
Brown, F. 
Rrynlng, W. 
Brown, James 
Burk, C. 
Bnoktman, F. 
Bundersen. Jens 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlsen. Hans 
Capello, H. 
Carlson. A. 
Carlson. R. -K5s 
Carlson. J. -S61 
Chntard. Emil 
Clewlev. James 
Clark. S. D. 
Clauson. C. L. 
Cortes, P. 
Cook. H. 
Corl. V. 
<-ralg. C. A. 
Chrlstensen. O. 
Danlelsen. David 
Daniels, C. 
Danlelsen. Ernest 
nennett, J. 

T>hoth. Paul 
Doran, Eugene 

Dorest, A. C. 

Dohman, F. 

Duncure, Y. 

Dudler, H. 

Edson, F. 

Edvardsen. J. 

Ekeland, S. 

Ellingsen, H. 

Eltman. H. 

Englund. R. 

Englund. L. F. 

Engberg. O. 

Erikson, Olav 

Eriksen, Allen 

Eriksen. Viktor 

Eriksen, Konrad 

Eriksen, Aug 

Eskola, H. 

Evans, S. 

Ferraris. J. 

Fernandez, D 

Fitzgerald, H. 

Fisher. T. 

Flynn. P. 

Karlson. G. -622 

Frlvold. J. J. 

Fredrlksen, W. 

Frloke, C. 

Frankenberg, V. 

Carbers, H. 

Cad. V. 

Camber, Jas. 

Cerner. Hans 

Oonstrom. F. 

Coerke. E. 

C.ndt. W. 

Grower. Alton 

Grunholk. J. 

Crpen. J. 

Onnnason. J. 

Oundorsen. G. 

Cunthpr. RIohar-1 

Oundorsen. And. 

Cnstafsen. Karl 

Ontman. H. 

T I. an sen. Fred 

Hansen. H. -1723 

Hav. W. -1179 

Harker. TTd. 

Haker. Max 

Hartnett. W. 

Hansen. Maurice 

Hacpn. C. L. 

Hansen. H. C. F. 

Hansen. N. 

Haee. A. 

Halberg. O. 

Hardy. W. 

Hansen. Albert 

TTanson. W. 

Wansrer. R. 

VTansen J. E 

Hakonsen. John 

TTelms. W. 
Wpldenbpre. G. 
JJprmanoen. P. 
Henrlks. G. 



Iversen, S. B. 
Isaksen. I. 
Ivarsen. I 
Jacobson, Ole 
Jacobsen, J. A. 
Jacobs, W. M. 
Jacobsen, Johan 
Jacobsen, H. M. 
Jacobsen, John 
Jack. P. 

Jacobsson, Johan 
Jensen. P. -1431 
Jensen. E. -1298 
Jensen, J. G. -1668 
Jensen, P. -718 
Jensen. J. G. -686 
Johansen. T. B. 
Johansen, A. P. 
Johansen. Th. P. 
Johansen. Geo W. 
Johnsen. Aug. -1451 
Johnsen. Fr. 
Johnson. C. J. -1566 
Johnson, N. G. 
Johnson. Martin 
Johnson. H. L. 
Johnson, Tim 
Johnsson, John A. 
Johnson. C. 
Johansen. K. J. 
Jones. W. 

Jonsson. A. J. 

Jones. Fred. 

Jorgensen. Alf. 

Jorgensen. Th. 

Jorgensen. J. A. 

Jurgenson. John 

Jordt. P .-1737 

Jurgenson. Ernest 

Kahibetzer. F. 

Karlson. J. A. -388 

Kanford. Ed 

Karlstrom, C. 

Karsimer. N. J. 

Kermagoret. A. 

Kelly. P. 

Kittelsen. K. 

KInloch, W. 

Klemettilla, H. 

Kloes, W. O. F. 

Klemensen, C